Propane?/Butane?

Jan 3, 2013
865
1,198
Mayenne, France
Funster No
24,131
MH
Rapido
Exp
Since 2010
Is it my imagination or does Propane burn hotter than Butane?

We use both from time too time and it seems Butane takes longer to boil a saucepan of water than Propane.

Are there any experts out there who can give a definitive answer?
 

Tootles

Funster
Deceased RIP
Sep 14, 2013
9,513
34,914
Lancaster
Funster No
28,093
MH
Coachbuilt
Exp
Was a newbie, now a Middie.
Butane provides almost twice (?) the heat value of propane, but dosent work well in (very) cold weather, hence Prope is the 'in' gas for outdoor winter types......And it's a tad cheaper.
 
Apr 18, 2009
3,577
3,340
Englishman in Mid Wales
Funster No
6,340
MH
Hymer B584, A Class
Exp
Not long enough!
Propane and butane are two similar gases used for heating and other fuel applications. Although proponents of each gas hold theirs to be the superior, both have benefits and disadvantages. Butane burns more cleanly and provides more energy, but propane is a better choice for situations in which temperatures may drop below freezing. Ultimately, the gases are quite similar, and the choice between the two largely depends on the availability and intended use of the product.

Similarities
Both gases are derived from petroleum, either from oil or natural gas, but have different chemical structures. Each burns at similar temperatures and both release water and carbon dioxide as waste products. If the amount of oxygen available is limited when the gasses are being burned, they may also produce soot and carbon monoxide. In some cases, the gases may be used interchangeably, but people should always consult the manufacturer before attempting to substitute one for the other.
 

Tootles

Funster
Deceased RIP
Sep 14, 2013
9,513
34,914
Lancaster
Funster No
28,093
MH
Coachbuilt
Exp
Was a newbie, now a Middie.
Mr JJ, your so........CLINT!! :)

I don't think it's nice, you laughin'. You see, my mule don't like people laughing. He gets the crazy idea you're laughin' at him. Now if you apologize, like I know you're going to, I might convince him that you really didn't mean it.
:rofl:
 
Jul 9, 2012
571
967
Devon
Funster No
21,869
MH
Coachbuilt
Exp
Never leave a campsite with your clothes line tied to a lamp post.
When I buy disposable cylinders for when I am fishing / camping under canvas they are a 70/30 mix of Propane and Butane which gives the best of both worlds. Why can't they all be like that? The answer will almost certainly come down to profit...............:rolleyes:

Tinca
 
OP
Scattycat
Jan 3, 2013
865
1,198
Mayenne, France
Funster No
24,131
MH
Rapido
Exp
Since 2010
Many thanks for all your
learned replies.
But I'm still convinced that when boiling a saucepan of water the Propane boils it quicker and also when using the cadac it seems to get hotter more quickly than Butane.
Hey, ho. maybe the local supermarket supplier gets the labelling wrong on the tanks . LOL

I'll have to do some definitive experiments to prove my theory wrong:(
 
Apr 13, 2012
3,956
10,856
Funster No
20,541
MH
Mobilvetta Euroyacht
Exp
1996, then break 'til 2011
Campingaz is a propane/butane mix - but soooo expensive

Just realised that my van was probably designed for 2 x Campingaz bottles, not Calor 4.5kg (that's why I couldn't carry a spare Calor bottle - too big).

So I will carry 1 Calor bottle and 1 Campingaz + valve - so gas in Europe will not be a problem

The largest Campingaz 'only' holds 2.7kg of gas but it is amazing how much gas it produces.

Earlier this year I used that size bottle to 'torch on' 40 square metres of roofing felt ! - just one 2.7kg bottle
 

DBK

Jan 9, 2013
13,247
20,911
Plympton, Devon
Funster No
24,219
MH
PVC, Murvi Morocco
Exp
2013
I think there is a real life difference but it is not down to "calorific values" . When you start cooking the liquid gas in the bottle starts to cool as gas is drawn off. In extreme cases this can cause ice to form on the outside of the bottle - and show you exactly how much gas you have left, so it isn't all a bad thing. With butane as the liquid cools the pressure falls significantly. With propane, which has a much lower boiling point the reduction in pressure is not nearly so marked. So I guess it is quicker cooking with propane because the cooker (or BBQ) is running off a higher gas pressure.
 
SMC Motorhomes Newark
RoadPro
Johns Cross
Safeguard Motorhome Insurance
Rhino Installs
Friendly professional service from qualified technicians
Free Club Stickers
Dave Newell Leisure Vehicle Services
Top