Retrofitted a Webasto EVO 40 diesel heater to a 2016 Hymer Exsis-I

Urs4_2008

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Just wanted to share this, since I was unable to find any information similar when doing this project.

Me and my family use the MH a lot during the cold winter here in Norway. It can get colder than 30 celcius below freezing, (-22 F), but normally around -10 celcius (14 F) during winter. The Hymer Exsis-I (integrated motorhome) is well insulated, and has insulated tanks and a powerful Truma gas / electric heater (6000 watts).

The problem with this solution is that you either
a) must rely on using only electric, which yields only 2 kilowatts of heating - which can be a bit on the low side - and requires a connection to a 230v / 10 amp minimum outlet, or
b) changing the 11 kilo gas bottles almost every 24 hours, if it's quite cold etc.

Also the Hymer has a few cupboards, but nowhere really to dry clothes. This is a big issue when the family returns from a day in the slopes or from a cross country ski trip, and needs to dry off a lot of clothes.

The solution to this I thought would be to retrofit a diesel heater, if at all possible, considering things like available space, heating of the water tanks etc.

So I did a lot of examination of the Hymer's underside and inside.

The following had to be tackled in this project:

0) Which heater product to buy, and what capacity.
1) Where to put the heater.
2) The direction of the heater.
3) Where to place the outside ducting if mounted outside
4) Where to put the heated air flow silencer (really a clever thing, but optional)
5) Where to let the ducting enter the MH from outside
6) Where to put the ducting inside
7) Where to put the vents
8) Would it be possible to get heating inside the cupbords?
9) Would it be possible to get heating into the bathroom?
10) Would it be possible to get heating from the diesel heater also into the water tanks to avoid freezing etc?
11) How to make sure to get a bit of heating in most parts of the MH
12) How to allow for efficient (and recommended) ducting to maximize heater operation.
13) If mounted outside, how to insulate the ducting using what kind of products.

I will try to describe the different sections and how I reasoned for my choices in the following posts. You can also view the short video about the installation. Have fun laughing at my Norwegian-English :)

 
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Sounds a good idea to me in those temperatures you describe. You would have been better getting a van that had diesel heating from new. It will be difficult to get pipes everywhere now the van has been fully built.
 
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Urs4_2008

Urs4_2008

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0) Which heater to buy.
There's a few different options. My requirements and priorities where as following:
  1. Reliable
  2. Power efficient (using only 12v battery power)
  3. Silent
  4. Easy to operate
  5. Low maintenance both labor and cost
  6. As cheap as possible
  7. Not too big physical size.
  8. Correct heating output.
Apart from a few Chinese clones I found primarily two options. Either a unit from Eberspacher or one from Webasto. They are about the same cost, size, power consumtion, heat output and available accessories. Since I have most experience with Webasto (from previous MH using Webasto Dual Top and Air Top), I went with this option. The Webasto units are really reliable, quite easy to mount, possible to mount in several different configurations both inside and outside the MH. The unit is also quite efficient when it comes to power consumption.

Webasto offers a lot of different options to their heaters also. Ranging from app control, different timers, digital controllers, smart controllers etc. and they're really easy to operate using the best controllers.

Unfortunately they're not really cheap. About 2220 British pounds, if you fit it as a DIY job. Probably a lot more if you find someone that will take on the install.

Maintenance is almost non existent on these units.

The size is not frightening, considering the heat output. A few different mounting options existed.

Also, using a hot air silencer, mounting outside, consideration when planning the intake, as well as mounting an exhaust muffler and combustion silencer, planning the pump fixing well, the unit is relatively quiet, all considered.

Next, what size to get. Webasto makes units with output heating of 2 kw, 4 kw and 5.5 kilowatts in this class. The smallest unit is also physically smaller than the bigger units, which has the same size but different fans inside. The 4 and 5.5 kw versions are equal in dimensions, but the bigger uses a bit more electricity and fuel, of course.

I figured the smallest would be too small. It is recommended only up to 2 outlets, which was too few for me. I wanted outlets in 2 cupboards, the luggage compartment (garage), the bathroom, the front of the car and into the water tanks. So the choice was between getting an EVO 40 or an EVO 55. The biggest i figured would be too big, and as the original Truma still was mounted and working as original for an additional 6 kilowatts of heating, the extra 1,5 kilowatts wasn't needed, I figured. Total heating capacity of 6+4 kilowatts would be plenty enough. So with the relative high output, and a bit smaller electricity usage, I went for the EVO 40.

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Urs4_2008

Urs4_2008

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Sounds a good idea to me in those temperatures you describe. You would have been better getting a van that had diesel heating from new. It will be difficult to get pipes everywhere now the van has been fully built.

The job is already done :) The problem is that almost every van has a gas heater of some sort (Alde water heating or Truma air heating), and the options with diesel heaters are very, very limited.
 
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Urs4_2008

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1) Where to put the heater.
2) The direction of the heater.

This is a big one. The physical requirements of the installation meant there were a few different options. I wanted space to mount the optional heated air ducting silencer. It has 90mm connections in either end:
l_w962901.jpg


My primary need was to get heating into the cupboards in the rear of the car. Also, where to fetch the air to be heated would need some thinking. The installation manual states two options: Either fresh air from somewhere outside nowhere close to the vehicles exhaust or other possible contaminants, or recirculated air from the habitation space of the MH. The different options have different advantages and disadvantages.

Fresh air intake:
  • Reduces moisture inside of the vehicle due to the constant pumping of fresh, cold, relatively dry winter air which pushes out the old, stale and moist air inside the MH through the original roof vents.
  • This reduces the heating efficiency quite a lot, and increases heating time and power usage, but also reduces moisture, which is a big point.
  • The pressure for the heater output could possible be a bit much, but not sure about that point.
Recirculated air intake:
  • Heats MH a lot faster.
  • Uses less fuel.
  • Uses less electricity (12v battery capacity)
  • Lets unit reduce fan speed, which reduces noise.
  • Does little to remedy moist.
I went for recirculated air intake for the above reasons.

One option for mounting would be to put the heater inside the luggage compartment (garage). This would be doable, and would protect the heater from the elements outside, but it would seriously f..ck up the available space and possible usage of the compartment. And the fitting would need to be very precise not to generate exhaust leakage inside the living area. Not impossible, but not the best solution in my opinion. The advantage would be shorter intake (none required) and much shorter ducting run inside the MH. Also, the need for insulation would not be as much.

Next, where to get the MH habitation air into the diesel air heater? This would also dictate where to place the heater and what direction it would be.

So where to put it outside?

The Hymer Exsis-I has a small room accessible from the outside, to access the valves for the hot water, and for storing small stuff. This room is below the sofa in the cabin. I opted to drill a 90mm hole through the double bottom of the MH in this room, and mount the heater below this. Adding a short pipe and an intake grill (which also generates pressure for the fan), this room also is ideal for sound insulation, and shares the original air grille which the Truma uses to recirculate air when operating.

This meant the heater would push hot air backwards, in the direction I would like it to go to reach the cupboards, where I would like to dry clothes, shoes etc.
 
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3) Where to place the outside ducting if mounted outside
4) Where to put the heated air flow silencer (really a clever thing, but optional)
5) Where to let the ducting enter the MH from outside

The 4) placing of heated air silencer, which makes the noise from the fan inside the diesel heater almost inaudible when sticking your air into the hot air outlet, I found a perfect spot between the real wheels. There's a lot of free space, and available from both sides. This is where I opted to mount the big silencer. Next, I fitted the ducting from the heater outlet to one side of the silencer. The Alko chassis of the Hymer has clever openings precut in the chassis main beams, in which the ducting barely fitted (90mm). Later, I disconnected the ducting and added insulation. So far so good.

Next, I had to decide where to let the ducting enter the RV. This dictates yet another quite big 90 mm hole to be made in the MH's floor. Not much room for too many attempts :) Looking in the rear garage of the Hymer there is a "hidden" room on the right side, below the lowest shelf. I dismounted it and found it to hide different pipes of both hot air and fresh water refill, as well as a bit of free space. Luckily, below, on the outside, there was availability just behind the rear wheel plastic fender, enough to drill a hole and put the 90mm ducting through, into the hidden room. This side of the alko chassis also had precut holes in which the ducting fitted, so it was relatively easy to position the piping from the other side of the silencer, through the alko chassis and into the hole and up into the hidden room. Now, I would have hot air at this location.

Where to route the hot air next?

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6) Where to put the ducting inside
7) Where to put the vents
8) Would it be possible to get heating inside the cupbords?

Where I'd like the hot air outlets and the possible ways to put the ducting where equally dictating what to do next. I wanted an outlet in both cupboards (one on each side) in the rear, as well as a way to get heating into the fresh water and gray water tanks. Luckily, this hidden room in the garage already had ducting to the luggage compartment from the existing Truma gas heater. So splicing the webasto heater hot air into this would both put hot air into the garage, as well as into the water tanks and the right rear bed / window wall.

The ducting came vertically from below the car, so I needed a way to angle the ducting in a non restrictive way towards the existing piping. First I went with a webasto 90 degree bend original part, but later I replaced it with a Y connection with 90/90/90mm openings. This is very non-restrictive and yields 50% air flow in each direction of the top of the y, as well as gently bending the direction of the air flow.

On one of the openings of the Y, I connected a 90/90 through connection with a 60mm 45% directional opening, which gives 90% through and 30% flow to the 60mm ducting. The 60mm ducting I connected into a 60/60/60 45% bend into the original Truma pipes running to the garage. This puts most of the hot air going towards the Truma in the reverse direction, which also incidentally runs through the water tanks :) but also allows for about 10% of the 30% of the 50% going back into the garage. This vent has the option to be directed or closed.

Next, the hidden room also gave an excellent access to the right side cupboard - the biggest one. I connected another 90/90/60 fitting on the main ducting and routed it to the vent in the cupboard.; The hole was drilled and outlet mounted in the correct space in the cupboard rear wall (just above the floor). Predrilled with a small bit to check the exact location was a good plan. I selected a 60mm closeable, directionally regulated original webasto outlet. This gives me the opportunity to regulate air flow and ammount inside the cupboard (which by the way has builtin venting openings in the top and bottom of the cupboard door).

The main ducting of 90 mm is almost impossible to route in a nice way anywhere inside the car, except for the middle, lowest step towards the rear beds. The setup in the car is one bed front to back on each side in the rear of the MH, and 2 steps between the beds. The last, tallest step hides a storage compartment, which also serves as the center wall of the hidden compartment in the rear. Aha :)

I figured it would be possible to run the main vent (well, at least 50% of the airflow from the Y mounted in the hidden room) through this wall in the hidden compartment, turning about 90 degrees towards the front of the MH in the bottom of this storage, through the water tank access compartment and out through a 90mm big (!) directional, closeable vent in the lower step. This serves as my optionally main ducting, using webasto terms. But since it is closeable, I would need another outlet which cannot be closed. More on that in a bit.

On this 90mm ducting running to this big outlet in the middle, rear of the MH, at the bottom of the steps (and actually right next to the original Truma outlet in the rear), I put another 90/90/60mm 45 degree bend to allow for heated air to run towards the second, left cupboard in the rear of the car (both cupboards are below the beds). In this smaller cupboard, I removed the floor, drilled a 60mm opening and put a closeable vent, which I connected to the previously mounted fitting on the 90mm ducting. The result so far is a lot of (controllable) heated air in both rear cupboards, as well as a big outlet in the main living area of the car.

About to adjust ducting in the hidden room accessible from within the garage in the rear of the Hymer. The black 60 mm ducting running back and forth was the old setup. But the new Y connector is visible, as well as the main 90 mm duct running through the floor. The first fitting after the Y runs to the right cupboard, below the toilette paper :) The rest of the grey 60 mm pipe runs into the existing Truma ducting, barely visible to the left, behind the black 60 mm ducting.
IMG_3046.jpg


Piping running below right cupboard, towards the front of the vehicle (60 mm). This is from the right, second exit of the Y in the hidden compartment. Notice the floor of the cupboard is removed for access. No space for 90mm here... Existing Truma ducting is brown, new Webasto ducting is the black one. Also notice the white webasto outlet on the wall.
IMG_3052.jpg


Outlet in left cupboard, white webasto original, closeable, directional outlet. This is hooked up to the main 90 mm ducting.
IMG_3053.jpg


Main 90 mm outlet, in the lowest rear step, next to original Truma outlet:
IMG_3058.jpg


Main ducting running through water compartment. Notice exit to the left cupboard. 90/90/60 fitting:
IMG_3054.jpg
 
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Urs4_2008

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Yes, but for me in Norway I will have to pay import taxes, shipping, shipping and handling fees etc. And ducting, fittings etc. add up.

The heater was a little above half of the total price for the project. I bought the heater at a discount here in Norway (at about 1250 GBP) and a ducting kit at 296 GBP. The rest, fittings, smart controller etc. was bought from Butlertechnic, adding up to the total mentioned.

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9) Would it be possible to get heating into the bathroom?
10) Would it be possible to get heating from the diesel heater also into the water tanks to avoid freezing etc?
11) How to make sure to get a bit of heating in most parts of the MH

As for the bathroom, yes, the piping is accessible. For now I haven't modified the install, but I'm about to order the fitting I lack. One of the fittings will have a remotely operated regulator to allow for regulating how much air flow to enter the Truma ducting. When I connect to the existing Truma ducting in this location (below the floor of the left, rear cupboard) I will also get some heating along the left bed and outer wall / windows, much like what I already achieved on the right side bed / wall / window.

The heating into the water tanks was solved as described earlier, but I also desperately wanted an outlet as far into the front of the MH as possible. I had at least two options to achieve this. Either splice a Y connection below the car and run piping outside, under the car going forward, and finding a clever place to run the piping through the floor and to a vent somewhere in the front. This solution would steal a lot of the heaters capacity due to even longer ducting runs outside, and there were nowhere really clever to make the 90 mm hole through the floor and also find a good place to put the 90 mm vent. I didn't do an awful lot of research into this, so there might be a solution.

The second best, I figured, was to run the ducting from the second part of the first Y splitter in the hidden compartment in the rear. I had to put a reducer on the y, going from 90 mm to 60 mm ducting because of space limitations in the intended direction of the piping. Placing the ducting below the floor in the right, rear cupboard, running it forwards, below the fridge (where I made a 60mm outlet from a 45 degree bend 60/60/60mm to get some hot air across into the bathroom, using a closeable, directional 60 mm outlet), below the kitchen drawers and out through a 60 mm open hole (not closeable) in the forward kitchen drawers wall. In this car's setup, it's right next to your foot when you enter the MH through the main door, to your left. This setup allowed for quite a bit of hot air almost to the front of the car.

So far there is no problem with cold in the front of the car, except during the initial heating from a totally freezing car. With the main, 90 mm outlet at this location, or even further in the front, the initial heating would go quicker. But this was not my main priority. The main priorities were to get heating into the rear cupboards and the water tanks.
 
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12) How to allow for efficient (and recommended) ducting to maximize heater operation.

In the initial setup, I had a 90 degree bend fitting in the hidden compartment, and connected a reducer from 90 mm to 60 mm, and bent the ducting 90 degrees right, then 90 degrees left to run the ducting towards the front of the car (and the outlet at the door step). This resulted in a lot of resistance for the heater, and each bend of the piping steals a big percentage of the heating reaching the outlet. This is why I changed the 90 degree bend with a 90/90/90 Y fitting, which resulted in me being able to run the 90mm ducting straight through the left wall of the hidden room, into the top most step storage, making an easy 90 degree right bend with only the ducting and going straight forward to the 90 mm main opening at the lower step.

This resulted in a lot quicker heating from cold, and the heater seemed to run less restricted. This is also much more in accordance with webasto recommendation in the installation ducumentation.

See marine manual here for more information regarding ducting and fittings:

https://www.butlertechnik.com/downloads/Webasto_Install_Instructions_Marine_heating_systems.pdf

When you're doing a complete design, you can calculate all the resistance points in both the inlet and outlet, and make sure you're within recommended maximums. I did not do this to it's deepest extent, and in doing so I run the risk of either not getting maximum heating from my heater installation (which is ok) or in worst case get heater malfunction due to too high restriction or internal temperature in the heater due to too low cooling from too little passing air. So far I've had no issues, so fingers crossed.

ducting.JPG
 
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Next, the following needed to be sorted:
  1. Where and how to mount the diesel heater dose pump for the fuel supply for correct operation and as silent as possible operation.
  2. The electrical connections to the heater itself (the cable run and connection to the battery)
  3. The electrical connection to the diesel pump.
  4. The selection of what Webasto controller to use.
  5. The electrical connection to, and placement of the controller.
  6. Where to mount the diesel supply line.
  7. Where to mount the optional fuel filter.
  8. How to get diesel out of the vehicle's main fuel tank (which is a very important point of the whole project)
Dose pump. Makes a clicking noise which, if mounted correctly, can be dampened quite a lot. Opposite, mounted incorrectly results in a loud clicking noise which can be heard both on the inside and outside of the MH:

s-l300.jpg



The Hymer Exsis-I has a clever, removable panel to access the fuel tank from within the cabin, rendering the dismounting of the fuel tank unnecessary. VERY good :) I put the fuel line down from this end, and found it below the tank.

IMG_2672-900.jpg

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  1. Where and how to mount the diesel heater dose pump for the fuel supply for correct operation and as silent as possible operation.
The manual has a good description of how to best mount the fuel pump. It's supposed to be close to the tank, and in a certain elevation. It's also recommended to use 90 degree bends on the fuel pipes in both directions to greatly reduce operational noise. I found a nice spot just below the tank, connected the two 90 degree bends and connected the fuel pipes as according to the manual in both ends. One end runs to the top of the tank, the other is routed to the heater. It is very important to put the connections very tightly together to prohibit the formation of air bubbles in the fuel supply, as described in the manual.

The pump also comes with a special, rubber fitting. This is essential to dampen the noise.
 
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2. The electrical connections to the heater itself (the cable run and connection to the battery)
The heater needs power. And especially during startup. So the cable run should be as short as possible, and with the correct wire dimensions. I used the supplied harness, and cut down the length to fit my requirements. The dimension of the wire is quite generous, but if you're unsure, run the numbers through a calculator online. I think 3% loss is normal, if I remember correctly. Breakers are supplied. I ran the wires shortest way possible, avoiding hot areas like the MH exhaust, towards the batteries. In this RV, the batteries are on the front right side, below the top floor. It was relatively easy to drill a hole next to the existing battery drain hole, and cut the wires and run them through and into the battery box.

In the battery box I re-soldered and connected the breakers and then finally connected the cables to the negative and positive battery terminals. No fuse yet, that would be the last to be configured.

Cable calculator ie:
http://www.calculator.net/voltage-drop-calculator.html
 
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Thanks :) Truma gas heaters works fine, but I HATE it when they run out of gas, which always happens during night. Wake up to a really cold car, and even colder wife and frozen solid kids... It would be different if the MH had a huge LPG tank, but almost no MH in Norway has this.

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I forgot a picture of the recirculated air inlet. This is a small storage compartment available from outside, circa on the middle of the MH. Notice the black grille protecting the inlet from bigger particles.

Also notice the black sound insulation material. This was during testing. I was able to reduce the noise during maximum operation by about 9 db by playing with a few of these plates (reducing audible noise to about 1/3 inside the MH :)

IMG_3045.jpg
 
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3. The electrical connection to the diesel pump.

This cable runs from the combustion air intake in the webasto unit. In the kit there are parts to make waterproof connections and a wire harness. The polarity is not important. Just made the connector and ran the wires the same direction as the diesel supply line towards the pump. Quick-connector into the pump. Quite easy this part :)
 
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3. The electrical connection to the diesel pump.

This cable runs from the combustion air intake in the webasto unit. In the kit there are parts to make waterproof connections and a wire harness. The polarity is not important. Just made the connector and ran the wires the same direction as the diesel supply line towards the pump. Quick-connector into the pump. Quite easy this part :)

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4) The selection of what Webasto controller to use.
5) The electrical connection to, and placement of the controller.

In the original kit, an analogue controller is supplied. I do not like this, as it is difficult to know what temperature you're aiming for. I wanted something easy to read, easy to operate and digital. Preferably programmable to accommodate night mode with temperature regulated lower during night time and automatically hotter in the morning, allowing the family to wake up in a toasty warm car. Webasto has made just the thing. They can supply two different, almost equal "Smart Controller"s. One is programmable, otherwise quite equal, I believe.

webasto smart controller.jpg


Regarding the placement of the controller, I wanted it to be easy to see, easy to reach, and not to demanding to run the wires. The result was just above the sofa on the sofas rear facing wall. Out of harms way, but easy to reach and easy to discover current setting. The controller easily plugs into the existing wire harness supplied with the heater - using the remote control part of the harness. I did not mount the other controller supplied with the kit as it is not required for operation. Lucky me :)

IMG_2689-900.jpg
 
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Where to mount the diesel supply line.
Where to mount the optional fuel filter.
How to get diesel out of the vehicle's main fuel tank (which is a very important point of the whole project)

The diesel supply line was quite easy to attach to various parts of the alko chassis using strips. Probably best to protect exposed areas of the pipe using some sort of shielding (ie. another pipe).

The optional fuel filter should be mounted before the fuel pump, and at an location not too hard to reach. I selected at the top of the tank, reachable from within the MH when removing the top access panel from within.

The fuel pickup is "interesting". :unsure: There are several options for how to do this. Some requires complete removal of the tank, some requires removal of the main tank "manhole" to attach the inside parts of the pickup pipe. Another way is to plug a "T" connection into existing fuel lines. In modern cars, I think the fuel pump is mostly inside the tank, and the preassure on the fuel pipe outlet for the MH engine is too high for the webasto fuel pump. This results in a fuel pickup pipe needing to be installed. If you are a toad like me, and order a marine kit, you will get a "marine pickup pipe", which is too big to fit on a standard vehicle tank. Eberspacher and webasto make smaller, low profile fittings, but these requires removal of the manhole etc. which generates a lot of possible fuel spill inside the MH.

I found a local company that supplies a very clever peace of kit that allows you to drill a single, I think 13 mm hole into the tank from the top, and, holding a steel wire connected to the pickup pipe, just put the whole thing into the fuel tank, with spring loading, orings and everything, and then just fish back out the top part, add an end cap and tighten a bit. Thats actually all there was to it. But it was a bit difficult to put all the components of the pickup into the hole, but all in all a very clever peace of kit :) (y) Next, a rubber connection on this pickup connecting the small, plastic fuel pipe to the optional fuel filter, then further down to the webasto fuel pump. Voila!

rv-see-stage-640.jpg
 
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Since 2009
Lastly, to start the heater for the first time, the two breakers needs to be installed. Then the heater needs to be attempted started about 3-4 times before it has pulled enough fuel to actually get combustion. Every time in between attempts, just switch heater off and on. You will get an error code (E11, if I remember correctly).

The heater generates a little bit of diesel steam exiting the exhaust for a short while when starting, but after this, the exhaust is not very much, not especially smelly. All in all a superb product which works like a dream. It uses about 1.5 to 3.5 amps, depending on what output speed it determines it needs based on the delta between whats configured and what is measures (using either the built in temp sensor which measures the temperature in the air inlet) or the optionally external temp sensor which you can connect if needed (or if running fresh air mode - in which case it is required to have a temperature sensor mounted on the inside of the RV).

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Urs4_2008

Urs4_2008

Free Member
Aug 12, 2016
266
178
Vestskogen, Norway
Funster No
44,561
MH
Hymer Exsis-I
Exp
Since 2009
The intake of the combustion air is quite noisy, but is easily fixed using the supplied intake air silencer. This needs to be mounted as according to the manual.

The exhaust needs to exit at an edge of the vehicle, pointing downwards at a maximum angle of 10 degrees, and in a location which doesn't fill the pipe with road gunk etc. There are also requirements regarding total degrees of bends in the exhaust pipe, and considerations regarding condensation due to low spots in the system. (Low spots requires a hole to be drilled). I recommend reading the manual in detail for both the exhaust and of course the complete project before anyone attempt anything like this :)


https://www.butlertechnik.com/downloads/Webasto_Air_Top_EVO_40_&_Air_Top_55_Installation_manual.pdf


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Theonlysue

LIFE MEMBER
Sep 14, 2009
5,926
6,896
Essex
Funster No
8,456
MH
Hymer ML-T 630
Exp
Not long enough!
I wonder why hymer don't offer a diesel heating option for the living area?
In Germany last year at minus15 c I used 36 litres of lpg in 3 days but I was warm.
 
OP
Urs4_2008

Urs4_2008

Free Member
Aug 12, 2016
266
178
Vestskogen, Norway
Funster No
44,561
MH
Hymer Exsis-I
Exp
Since 2009
I wonder why hymer don't offer a diesel heating option for the living area?
In Germany last year at minus15 c I used 36 litres of lpg in 3 days but I was warm.
I think most customers don’t use the MH during the middle of the winter, and most customers uses shore power. Low heating requirements combined with 230 volts available makes the Truma probably the best option for most. But I agree, it should have been an option. Would be easier to install when the MH is built. :)

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Jan 19, 2014
4,581
14,059
south shields
Funster No
29,767
MH
Chausson 620 welcoome
Exp
since 1990
Nice work... im sure you will be rewarded with a lovely warm mh when away sking...
Im surprised the fuel tank didnt have an auxillary off take pipe already fitted...i thought most manufacturers did that now ....
Do you have a link to or photo of the fitting you did use for the fuel offtake...
Did you look into the options of getting a large underslung lpg tank fitted or not...i know you said it wasnt common in norway and i wondered why...is pumped lpg not readily available... and i suppose that would have involved carrying a good deal more weight..

My sister lives at the top end of lake nisser close to a little village called vrodål... when i visit i do see an increasing number of mh' on the road but most are foreign plated...
You norwegians seem to love your huts rather than motorhomes..:LOL:
Andy.
Ps.. ill watch your video when i get a better WiFi connection..(y)
 
Oct 29, 2008
4,359
4,067
West Yorkshire
Funster No
4,712
MH
PVC
Exp
since 2008
We had a diesel heater on a previous van. They are very efficient and use very little diesel. However they do use a lot of power on start up so need a good 12v supply. They are also very noisy and smelly. Personally I would have fitted a large under slung gas tank and kept with the Truma if I was you.

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