Idle the turbo before turning off engine (1 Viewer)

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Mar 23, 2012
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I thought the other big cause of wear is to dive off straight after starting and rev too much so the turbo has to work when cold might be more of a cause of wear
 

hilldweller

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The deep joy of the Open Forum.

I wonder if the OP is any more enlightened because two pages of this gloves off fighting has certainly confused me, I'm sorry I clicked on it.
 

Portland

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I always let the motor idle for a couple of minutes plus never start up and drive off immediately. Oil feed to the turbo has improved over the year's but it used to Be a common problem when they first appeared. The engineer at Midland bus co solved it by introducing a volks filter in the oil feed giving about a litre of oil feed after the engine ears stopped but of course the turbo would be still spinning. (Boring!) Tough
 
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Fulltiming Felines

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I thought the other big cause of wear is to dive off straight after starting and rev too much so the turbo has to work when cold might be more of a cause of wear
Great, another thing for me to worry about! Sure, this makes sense but it's the first I've heard about it.
 
Mar 23, 2012
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cylinderwear_temperature-png.213531


Found this on the net says its from continental motors so some might say not applicable to a modern diesel as probably was on air cooled petrol aero engines but there are a lot of suggestions that 75 to 90% of engine wear occurs when cold . Thats one reason a relatively high mileage younger car seems a much better bet to me than a low mileage older one thats had a lot of short journeys. Most manuals now say to drive off as soon as started but I think thats to reduce total emissions not to increase engine life.

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MillieMoocher

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Surely it must depend on the vehicle/engine?

My twin turbo Range Rover has automatic stop start, which switches off the engine in traffic etc. Think this is a fairly common feature on many modern turbo engines.

Hopefully the design engineers will have taken into account the oil starvation aspects!

I do recall a friend who had an Escort RS Turbo and that definitely said that the engine should be allowed to idle for (I think) one minute before turning off.
 
Mar 23, 2012
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I suppose the manufacturers and buyers have different priorities as to how long an engine should last before needing major work one until any warranty claims have passed the other possibly a lot longer!
 
Jul 29, 2007
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On my RV which has an 8.1 petrol non-turbo GM, if I simply turn the engine off after a run, it blows some water out of the overflow as the heat in the block boils the now none flowing coolant.
 
Aug 6, 2013
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Turbo design and oil technology has moved on considerably since the early turbo engines. The issue was always oil / bearing damage due to oil carbonising in the hot turbo. Turbo bearings aren't pressure fed - oil floods them and returns to the sump so they'll spin for a short while & retain an oil film on the bearings. Spin time is incredibly short anyway once the engine stops because of their air output being stalled by the inlet valves. Many turbos are water-cooled these days.

Petrol engine bore wear when cold was more of an issue before injection became the norm. A carburettor choke control was a pretty blunt instrument and excessive use caused fuel to wash oil from the cylinder walls so driving off as soon as possible meant the engine warmed faster. Cold starts (petrol injection engine) are undertaken using some accurate enrichment and varied ignition timing so the problem is much less acute. Diesels suffered much less anyway because of the lubricity of the fuel itself and a simpler cold start regime that has never been under driver control. An engine up to temperature means that designed clearances have been achieved so hot is better but that is much less of a problem than inaccurate fuelling. Basically stop worrying :).

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