Heart attack

Feb 28, 2016
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HOW TO SURVIVE A HEART ATTACK WHEN ALONE
Let's say it's 6.15pm and you're going home (alone of course),
...after an unusually hard day on the job. You're really tired, upset and frustrated. Suddenly you start experiencing severe pain in your chest that starts to drag out into your arm and up into your jaw. You are only about five miles (8kms) from the hospital nearest your home. Unfortunately you don't know if you'll be able to make it that far. You have been trained in CPR, but the guy that taught the course did not tell you how to perform it on yourself..!!
NOW HOW TO SURVIVE A HEART ATTACK WHEN ALONE..
Since many people are alone when they suffer a heart attack, without help, the person whose heart is beating improperly and who begins to feel faint, has only about 10 seconds left before losing consciousness.
However, these victims can help themselves by coughing repeatedly and very vigorously.A deep breath should be taken before each cough, and the cough must be deep and prolonged, as when producing sputum from deep inside the chest.
A breath and a cough must be repeated about every two seconds without let-up until help arrives, or until the heart is felt to be beating normally again. Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements squeeze the heart and keep the blood circulating.
The squeezing pressure on the heart also helps it regain normal rhythm. In this way, heart attack victims can get to a hospital.
Rather than sharing jokes please.. contribute by Sharing this which can save a person's life!!!!
 
OP
Tinker2
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Oh I copied this from another site, could you explain more?

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Nov 18, 2011
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@ambulancekidd I won't slate it but is their any medical foundation to this
I would think 999 would be my first thing to do I will keep it in mind just in case I have a hart attack
Bill
 

DuxDeluxe

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I looked on snopes and there is a little bit of truth but not much according to cardiologists

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ambulancekidd

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Since 1964 Gosh that makes me feel old.
@ambulancekidd I won't slate it but is their any medical foundation to this
I would think 999 would be my first thing to do I will keep it in mind just in case I have a hart attack
Bill

Yes it does work Bill. Its a trick that older & wiser paramedics teach to younger members of staff.
I've used it on many occasions to good effect, but it doesn't work on every occasion.
So the OP is quite correct in what he says, excellent advice indeed.
 
OP
Tinker2
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Hey I think 999 if poss and we will try anything, if all else fails and I am on my own, I will try to get my head between my legs to kiss my A--- goodbye.
 

Chris

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Well that’s really cheered me up anyway:eek:

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Apr 17, 2016
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That sounds like most people I know that smoke, deep breathing and coughing there guts up, seems they have the advantage should they be unfortunate to have a heart attack:LOL:
 

GWAYGWAY

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Not much you can do for yourself. Just hope that somebody like me is around with a defib to hand if it goes tits up. heart attacks themselves tend to be survivable but most people get confussed with cardiac arrest which is not, unless there is knowledgeable and equipped to help nearby.
 
Jul 24, 2010
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The British Heart Foundation have the following advice regarding Cough CPR.

EDD9CA07-5196-4BF1-B7C9-5EFFE17912E1.jpeg


Search Snopes Cough CPR to read the background to the original story.

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Borderland

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Seems like more incorrect information on Facebook, how many times have we come across these stories. Best way to help yourself is dial 999.
 
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Best advice . .

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Mattyjwr

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Yes it does work Bill. Its a trick that older & wiser paramedics teach to younger members of staff.
I've used it on many occasions to good effect, but it doesn't work on every occasion.
So the OP is quite correct in what he says, excellent advice indeed.

Could you explain how it works? It was reported early in the 2000s that it would work but there isn't any evidence to support the claim and medical groups have rejected the idea https://www.resus.org.uk/cpr/statement-on-cough-cpr/
 

ambulancekidd

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Since 1964 Gosh that makes me feel old.
Could you explain how it works? It was reported early in the 2000s that it would work but there isn't any evidence to support the claim and medical groups have rejected the idea https://www.resus.org.uk/cpr/statement-on-cough-cpr/

Its a practice that doesn't often appear in any medical textbooks. I can't easily explain how it works without going into a lot of detail & most people wouldn't understand but here goes, the stage of a cardiac arrest is when a patient goes in atrial fibrillation, this stage causes the heart to contract in an uncoordinated way, there is no meaningful pumping of blood. The cough technique has to be used just before this stage is arrived at & this movement makes the body release adrenalin which hopefully jolts the heart back into a normal sinus rhythm.
I must confess that I've never heard of this method of recovery being used by the patient themselves, but it can't do any harm. Some eminent cardiologist claim that it doesn't work, but when last did you see a cardiologist out in an ambulance doing emergency work?
The clinical environment in an ambulance is a very different way of working as opposed to a fully equipped hospital.
I've been returning highly qualified hospital staff back to the transfer point when we've been sent to an emergency & they're like a fish out of water. That's hardly surprising given the conditions which they normally experience.

Hope this helps...Robert.
 
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Seems like more incorrect information on Facebook, how many times have we come across these stories. Best way to help yourself is dial 999.

Are you saying that Facebook is not absolutely 100% true I cant belieeeve it.:whistle:

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Anthea M

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Do you have medical training, what has been your experience on this subject....just interested...(y)
Having had an allergic reaction to chemotherapy last October which affected my heart i was in great pain waiting for the ambulance , I had family with me to reassure me . On my own I’d like to think the coughing would help while I waited.
 
Mar 23, 2012
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The danger with advice like this is if someone feels slightly bettr they will possibly not call 999 while they can or more wooryingly try to drive to a and e and if they pass out possibly take a few more with them
 

GWAYGWAY

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If you NEED CPR then you are out of the picture, best thing after asking for help and an ambulance is lie down and TRY to relax and breath as deeply as possible while trying not to panic gently, get as much air in without hyper ventilating. Aspirin tablets are a good idea if there are any nearby, with somebody to get them., You are not in a position to self help, but you might well have had pre-warning of dire happenings BEFORE they happen, Angina, , neck pains, arm pains . Get help then not brush it off as nothing. Get you family to go with you on a CPR first aid course, everybody should know how to do it, even school kids get taught it now. Might be a family member dear to you that you save.
 

Mattyjwr

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Its a practice that doesn't often appear in any medical textbooks. I can't easily explain how it works without going into a lot of detail & most people wouldn't understand but here goes, the stage of a cardiac arrest is when a patient goes in atrial fibrillation, this stage causes the heart to contract in an uncoordinated way, there is no meaningful pumping of blood. The cough technique has to be used just before this stage is arrived at & this movement makes the body release adrenalin which hopefully jolts the heart back into a normal sinus rhythm.
I must confess that I've never heard of this method of recovery being used by the patient themselves, but it can't do any harm. Some eminent cardiologist claim that it doesn't work, but when last did you see a cardiologist out in an ambulance doing emergency work?
The clinical environment in an ambulance is a very different way of working as opposed to a fully equipped hospital.
I've been returning highly qualified hospital staff back to the transfer point when we've been sent to an emergency & they're like a fish out of water. That's hardly surprising given the conditions which they normally experience.

Hope this helps...Robert.


I understand what you say but as AFib is serious but not lethal as VFib, a patient with AFib is more likely to survive any way, coughing or no coughing. Does coughing make the heart beat regularly for someone in AFib in your experience?
 

Mattyjwr

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Having had an allergic reaction to chemotherapy last October which affected my heart i was in great pain waiting for the ambulance , I had family with me to reassure me . On my own I’d like to think the coughing would help while I waited.

I bellied that you would not have gained any benefit from coughing. It would probably have caused you stress and made your condition worse.
 

Borderland

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Its a practice that doesn't often appear in any medical textbooks. I can't easily explain how it works without going into a lot of detail & most people wouldn't understand but here goes, the stage of a cardiac arrest is when a patient goes in atrial fibrillation, this stage causes the heart to contract in an uncoordinated way, there is no meaningful pumping of blood. The cough technique has to be used just before this stage is arrived at & this movement makes the body release adrenalin which hopefully jolts the heart back into a normal sinus rhythm.
I must confess that I've never heard of this method of recovery being used by the patient themselves, but it can't do any harm. Some eminent cardiologist claim that it doesn't work, but when last did you see a cardiologist out in an ambulance doing emergency work?
The clinical environment in an ambulance is a very different way of working as opposed to a fully equipped hospital.
I've been returning highly qualified hospital staff back to the transfer point when we've been sent to an emergency & they're like a fish out of water. That's hardly surprising given the conditions which they normally experience.

Hope this helps...Robert.
Long time since I did any medical training but I thought that ventricular fibrillation was more likely in a heart attack and atrial fibrillation more likely to lead to a stroke.

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