Do I need A BusBar or something similar (1 Viewer)

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jo10000_6

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You maybe aware - electrical stuff not my forte (n) although I'm very pleased with myself as I did my Florescent Bulb change, stripping out its inners, to 12V strip lights and was quite chuffed !

Anyway, as the title suggests do I need a BusBar - wont do it myself - thick cabling not for me - not pliable enough for my skills !

My one battery has shunt connected to one terminal, I have some eyelets connected to my intelligent charger so I can just connect the cables together without lifting mats etc but I'm about to get a portable solar panel and ideally Id like to be able to disconnect certain things without to remove everything
from the battery poles.

So is it a Busbar or something else ?
 
Apr 27, 2016
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I'm not sure what you are trying to do. A distribution post or a busbar is better fixed to something solid like a wall or floor. You would need a spanner or screwdriver to connect and disconnect a solar panel to it. I'd say it's better to use a connector instead.
https://www.12voltplanet.co.uk/100a-busbar-with-4-stud-terminals.html
If you use a busbar, don't forget to get a plastic cover if it's exposed.
https://www.12voltplanet.co.uk/cover-for-100a-busbars.html
Solar panels usually use an 'MC4' connector, which is weatherproof. It is single-pole, so you'd need 2. They are not designed for easy disconnection, in that they have plastic 'barbs' that are fiddly to release to disconnect. I've heard that you can cut off the barbs if there's no danger of the connectors separating due to vibration etc.
Amazon product ASIN B00984U9BETo assemble an MC4 connector you'll need to crimp the pin onto the wire. Youtube is your friend here.

An alternative is Anderson connectors. If you use the 2-pole type it will prevent you connecting the wrong way round. If you want, one end could be fixed to the wall/floor. The pins need to be crimped, and again there are youtubes to show how. There are a few sizes of Anderson connector, and you would probably use the smallest one. You buy the pins to suit the size of wire, ie the cross-sectional area in square millimetres of the copper conductor. Typically you'll use 6 mm2 CSA for a single panel, to avoid too much voltage loss.

The terminals are here
Link Removed
and you can even get a handle to pull the connector easier (they are popular on motability scooters to connect the battery)
 
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DuxDeluxe

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Most funsters are more familiar with only the bar, not the bus. :whistle:

The above answer???(y)(y)(y) Great reply
 
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138go

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Look if the OP wants a BusBar let him have one ..

Bus-Bars-2-AdobeStock_111304019-1080x675.jpg


All he has got to do now is find somewhere to fit it and work out what it does and how to wire it in.
 
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Just a note to say that Udo Lang at Schaudt advised me to put the solar panel face down when connecting/disconnecting it, presumably to avoid voltage surge.

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Two on Tour

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Just a note to say that Udo Lang at Schaudt advised me to put the solar panel face down when connecting/disconnecting it, presumably to avoid voltage surge.

A solar panel is normally attached to the van roof by the time you connect it up so it would be easier to cover the panel with cardboard or a cloth. As the connections are normally in the van, then as I have done in the past, connect into the system at night when the panel is not producing. (y)
 
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andy63

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My one battery has shunt connected to one terminal


Im reading your post and assuming you want the ability to connect / disconnect various items of equipment like solar and chargers to your battery... you plan to do this by fitting a bus bar or simply put a fitting that allows you to make multiple connections to the battery easily....
Nothing wrong with that as long as you maintain the shunt connection to the battery correctly .. if you want it to keep doing the job its most probably fitted to do.... ie monitor current in and out of the battery...
if your shunt is on the negative lead then it shouldnt be a problem but if its on the posotive make sure your connections are all made to the same side of the shunt and the only connection to the posotive terminal is the other side of the shunt..
Hope you follow that..
Andy..
 
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jo10000_6

jo10000_6

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Look if the OP wants a BusBar let him have one ..

View attachment 294432

All he has got to do now is find somewhere to fit it and work out what it does and how to wire it in.


Hi Q4 - "He" is a '"she" ….._ I have all the enthusiasm and work ethic to get shit loads done just limited practical skills !:rolleyes:

Love the picture though ! :D

I'm info gathering - its not something I will tackle.

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jo10000_6

jo10000_6

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@autorouter

As always a very comprehensive reply. The solar panel is portable and within the kit was a connection that ideally id leave connected to my battery with the ringlets - for quick easy connect / disconnect. My intelligent charger does the same - ringlets sit there and then connect when required.

Im trying to cut down on the fath of the connections - and also the need to lift the covers of the LB area.

Thanks for the reply - as always I do appreciate it.

Ta
Jo
 

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jo10000_6

jo10000_6

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Im reading your post and assuming you want the ability to connect / disconnect various items of equipment like solar and chargers to your battery... you plan to do this by fitting a bus bar or simply put a fitting that allows you to make multiple connections to the battery easily....
Nothing wrong with that as long as you maintain the shunt connection to the battery correctly .. if you want it to keep doing the job its most probably fitted to do.... ie monitor current in and out of the battery...
if your shunt is on the negative lead then it shouldnt be a problem but if its on the posotive make sure your connections are all made to the same side of the shunt and the only connection to the posotive terminal is the other side of the shunt..
Hope you follow that..
Andy..


Hi Andy - yes its on the negative side. Im aware everything negative needs to connect to this for the monitor to work accurately.

Thanks for the comment.

Ta
Jo
 
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In your picture, the grey 2-pole connectors are Anderson SB connectors. The black round connectors are MC4. As you say, the eyelets can be permanently connected to the battery.

I don't want to make life over-complicated, but it's a good idea to make sure there's a fuse in the positive wire between the connector and the battery. One of these is OK.
https://www.12voltplanet.co.uk/standard-blade-fuse-holder.html
You can make more than one fit together as a block by sliding them so the dovetail bits fit. You can get a plate that can be screwed to a solid surface that they will slide onto to stop them moving around.
https://www.12voltplanet.co.uk/fixing-plate-for-standard-blade-fuse-holder.html

I think you'll be surprised how easy it is to use a crimp tool to make connections for yourself. Get something like this
https://www.screwfix.com/p/crimping-tool-9/3137v#_=p
and some insulated spade terminals, and try it out on a bit of spare wire. Insulated terminals are colour-coded for the size of wire: red = thin, blue = medium, yellow = thick. Mostly you'll need blue coloured ones. If you use a blue terminal with a thin wire it will be a bit loose and you can pull it out.

The crimping tool for Anderson and MC4 connectors is not the same one, but it's just as easy to use.
 
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jo10000_6

jo10000_6

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Thanks @autorouter.

I will think about the crimping tool. I've since decided to go a similar solar set up but no eyelets included so I'm assuming if I buy this (if I don't decide on the crimping tool) I should have everything I need.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Solar-Ch...e=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649.

I'm not buying anything until the solar kit comes then I will make some decisions and probably ask some more questions.

Thanks for the info !

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Apr 27, 2016
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This wire has what is called an 'insulated bootlace ferrule' on one end, that will go into screw-type terminals. You may want to cut them off and fit MC4 connectors, depending on what your solar panel requires.

The eyelets (ring terminals) are the uninsulated type, with some black heat-shrink insulation over them. You can get ring terminals with holes of various diameters, from 4 mm to 10 mm. 6 and 8 mm are popular.

You are wise to hold back on buying crimp tools if you're not sure. The tools for insulated and non-insulated crimp terminals are different, and there are different ones for bootlace ferrules, MC4 and Anderson connectors, as well as battery terminals. I have half a dozen different ones.

I find the most generally useful is the one for insulated crimp terminals, because you can fit eyelet terminals and spade terminals (also called blade terminals) easily.
ring_terminals_blue_parent.jpgmale_blade_blue_parent.jpg female_blade_blue_parent.jpg fully_insulated_female_blade_blue_parent.jpg
You can also use a 'butt connector' to just connect two wires permanently.
butt_crimp_parent.jpg
 
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jo10000_6

jo10000_6

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Hi
The solar panel came - the ends are what I now know as SAE. - picture attached.

I've seen some cabling with the ring terminals - all on a slow boat from somewhere - cant seem to find UK stock with the ring terminals.
I can probably take somewhere to get the ring terminals done as it will make life slight easier but here's my question - the connector with the crocodile clips does not have a fuse. Why do all the pictures of the of the connectors with ring terminals have a fuse?
If I change to ring terminals will I need a fuse? It would probably be easier to purchase the below.




Thanks
Jo
 

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Apr 27, 2016
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The cable in your link looks like it's suitable, because it has a fuse built-in. The rings look quite large, maybe 10mm, but you can always use washers to hold it if you can't get a smaller size.

Always have a fuse in a wire that's directly connected to a battery. With croc clips, if there's a problem and the wire start smoking and glowing red, you can knock the clips off the battery. As long as you're there to see it happening. For permanent installations like ring terminals, you always have a fuse or 'fusible wire link' to give it its posh name. It melts safely and cuts off the current.

SAE connectors are always ready moulded onto the wires - I've never seen them with crimp, solder or screw connections. To state the obvious, take care to get the polarity right when wiring them. And they're not weatherproof.
 
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jo10000_6

jo10000_6

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Thanks for the comments Autorouter (y).
Good tip on the washers - wouldn't have thought of that.
I've seen some waterproof cover caps for SAE solar connections - might just but them to have them in.
 
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