Which Campervan - Globestar v Malibu | MotorhomeFun | The Motorhome Support and Social Network

Which Campervan - Globestar v Malibu

Jan 13, 2020
18
21
Funster No
67,997
MH
Don’t own one yet
Exp
6byears
Hi All
We have been researching campervans for our first van purchase. We have narrowed it down to either a Globecar Globescout or a Malibu 600db.
Would really appreciate any advice -are we on the right lines with these two? Any reviews of either, good or bad would be great, or are there others we have missed or discounted, which you would recommend we consider.
Thanks in advance for any comments
 
Dec 19, 2019
193
974
Cornwall
Funster No
67,480
MH
Weinsberg PVC
Exp
Since 1982
Both excellent vans, I suspect you might be paying more for the Malibu brand than Globecar? I changed my van a couple of years back and Globecar was top of the list except I couldn’t live with their upholstery schemes - personal choice.
 
Jun 25, 2019
105
340
Funster No
61,925
MH
A class
Exp
Since 2002
I think the decision will come down to personal taste as both those brands (and Adria) regularly receive good write ups and reviews. I am awaiting a new Malibu Charming 600 GT which is due for collection from Germany hopefully this month. My advice would be to visit a show or site where they have both vans of your chosen layout so you can switch between the two and decide which one feels right for you. Personally, I chose Malibu over the competition because I really liked the finish and ambience inside, compared to others it felt a lot warmer and inviting, the build quality; catches, cupboards etc was good too. The rear bed is a good size, the bathroom with the swivel toilet and shower screen arrangement I think is a great use of the space, the bench seat was actually half comfortable and the glass roof over the cab area in lieu of storage makes the van feel so much more open (of course this is available in other brands now but not many). One final thing to consider is the fridge, more and more converters are now only offering compressor fridges whereas I wanted an absorber so that ruled out quite a few straight away.

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OP
C
Jan 13, 2020
18
21
Funster No
67,997
MH
Don’t own one yet
Exp
6byears
Thank you both. Captain Pants, I was trying not to let the upholstery influence me too much but I guess it is something you have live with and should consider more. Seakay22, had not fully considered Adria and I notice they have an oven, which was the one thing against the other two, so more research required into it, thanks. Would you not miss the storage taken away for the glass roof? I am ignorant about compressor fridges v absorber but will do some googling and find out more.
 
Aug 26, 2008
1,798
5,184
B&NES
Funster No
3,823
MH
Van Conversion
Exp
since 2007
Thank you both. Captain Pants, I was trying not to let the upholstery influence me too much but I guess it is something you have live with and should consider more. Seakay22, had not fully considered Adria and I notice they have an oven, which was the one thing against the other two, so more research required into it, thanks. Would you not miss the storage taken away for the glass roof? I am ignorant about compressor fridges v absorber but will do some googling and find out more.
The latest fad is the overcab sunroof. Depends on your taste and whether learning to duck before entering the cab is that important. I prefer the overcab locker - ideal place for storing the external silver screen.

Compressor fridges seldom go wrong but can be slightly noise at night. If you mostly use campsites with EHU they are fine.

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Feb 18, 2018
1,318
2,081
Funster No
52,460
Agree with SpeedyDux initially liked look of panoramic roof but wouldn’t buy one ... too hot, too cold, I’d miss my storage!
Oh and I have Globecar Campscout and love it but don’t think you could go wrong with either ... go in both and see what you prefer. Or you could buy a Pössl from EU same van different branding and interior woods/upholstery.
 
Reactions: f6c
Jun 25, 2019
105
340
Funster No
61,925
MH
A class
Exp
Since 2002
Thank you both. Captain Pants, I was trying not to let the upholstery influence me too much but I guess it is something you have live with and should consider more. Seakay22, had not fully considered Adria and I notice they have an oven, which was the one thing against the other two, so more research required into it, thanks. Would you not miss the storage taken away for the glass roof? I am ignorant about compressor fridges v absorber but will do some googling and find out more.
Compressor fridges are fine if you are more orientated towards campsites/hook up but not so great if you want to spend most of your time away from being plugged in so depends upon how you use the van really. As for losing the locker above the cab, I'm not concerned about that, the fixed bed layout has a load of storage underneath plus further space under the bench seat plus plenty of head height lockers. There's a blind to keep the sun out (same as the side windows/roof lights) and having spent lots of time in both versions, it just felt a better living space for me.

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Blue Knight

Funster
Aug 7, 2017
4,097
2,840
Durham
Funster No
49,879
MH
Ducato Maxi PVC
Exp
Sep 2016
Hi All
We have been researching campervans for our first van purchase. We have narrowed it down to either a Globecar Globescout or a Malibu 600db.
I'm a big Globecar 'D-line' fan which means that I like any van which is produced in the older well proven Globecar D-Line factory. These vans include the Campscout, Roadscout, Globescouts etc.

The Malibu vans are good pits of kit too but the Globecar D-line vans have a particluar good pedigree and one which is well respected in Germany.

That said, there are a few styles of Globescout and they vary in price depending on Spec etc. Here are the various examples for you:

1. Globescout (standard spec); note the lumpy non aerodynamic pod windows and if you go to the SMC web page then you'll see the one-colour wood. This one is on a new 2019 Peugot 160BHP chassis.

Screenshot_20200214-095209_Samsung Internet.jpg

2. Then you have the Globescout Elegance on a Fiat Cab, below. The Elegance Pack gives you such things as cream glossed cabinet doors and flushed external side windows which are better looking IMO and less noisy because of their aerodynamic properties. This particular example is circa £2,000 more than a normal Elegance model because it is equipped with the Fiat robotized gearbox. This one is on a Fiat 150BHP so lots of power!

Screenshot_20200214-095135_Samsung Internet.jpg

3. Finally, you have the newly distributed Globecar Globescout Plus Pop-top as seen below on a 165BHP Peugot chassis. This is a particularly nice looking van and well worth the money.

Also, if you don't have a part exchange to offer the dealer then I would be asking for a few thousand off the screen price - They will be keen to get rid of the two vans described in serials 1&2 above since these vans are last year's stock and they will want rid of them to free up some space and capital.

All the best,

Andrew

P.S. A warm welcome to the forum :cool:


Screenshot_20200214-095051_Samsung Internet.jpg
 
OP
C
Jan 13, 2020
18
21
Funster No
67,997
MH
Don’t own one yet
Exp
6byears
I'm a big Globecar 'D-line' fan which means that I like any van which is produced in the older well proven Globecar D-Line factory. These vans include the Campscout, Roadscout, Globescouts etc.

The Malibu vans are good pits of kit too but the Globecar D-line vans have a particluar good pedigree and one which is well respected in Germany.

That said, there are a few styles of Globescout and they vary in price depending on Spec etc. Here are the various examples for you:

1. Globescout (standard spec); note the lumpy non aerodynamic pod windows and if you go to the SMC web page then you'll see the one-colour wood. This one is on a new 2019 Peugot 160BHP chassis.

View attachment 362636

2. Then you have the Globescout Elegance on a Fiat Cab, below. The Elegance Pack gives you such things as cream glossed cabinet doors and flushed external side windows which are better looking IMO and less noisy because of their aerodynamic properties. This particular example is circa £2,000 more than a normal Elegance model because it is equipped with the Fiat robotized gearbox. This one is on a Fiat 150BHP so lots of power!

View attachment 362637

3. Finally, you have the newly distributed Globecar Globescout Plus Pop-top as seen below on a 165BHP Peugot chassis. This is a particularly nice looking van and well worth the money.

Also, if you don't have a part exchange to offer the dealer then I would be asking for a few thousand off the screen price - They will be keen to get rid of the two vans described in serials 1&2 above since these vans are last year's stock and they will want rid of them to free up some space and capital.

All the best,

Andrew

P.S. A warm welcome to the forum :cool:


View attachment 362638
Thanks for all this information. So much to take into consideration. Verging towards the Globecar so going to make a coffee and have a good look at all the information. All the different configurations can be confusing.
 

Blue Knight

Funster
Aug 7, 2017
4,097
2,840
Durham
Funster No
49,879
MH
Ducato Maxi PVC
Exp
Sep 2016
Thanks for all this information. So much to take into consideration. Verging towards the Globecar so going to make a coffee and have a good look at all the information. All the different configurations can be confusing.
The next thing is to establish how you want to use the van because if you need any equipment adding to the base package then it would be a good idea to try and get it included in the deal (solar units, extra batteries, extra gas capability, possible gas refill units etc).

IMO if you only ever want to use a PVC for camp sites with a constant electricity supply then a standard van from any dealer will do. However, if you want if for a few off-grid days or longer term off-gridding (as we do) then you'll need solar capability, extra batteries and extra gas. The 12v-only compressor fridge on any Globecar PVC will always zap your power so you'll need the extra juice to run your fridge when off grid.

The Globecar is a fab bit of kit but like any PVC on the market you'll need to add stuff depending on your requirements.

We have a Globecar forum in the Continental section below so check it out when you have a moment.

If you need any info then we'll all try and help.

Good luck,

Andrew
 
Oct 29, 2008
3,688
2,655
West Yorkshire
Funster No
4,712
MH
PVC
Exp
since 2008
We have had our Campscout Revolution for 3 1/2 years and still cant find anything that would suit us more.
Extra high, means it feels like a small coachbuilt inside and gives bags of storage. Plus on the Maxi chassis it has huge payload. And finally it has a large 3 way fridge freezer, which is hard to find in other PVCs

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OP
C
Jan 13, 2020
18
21
Funster No
67,997
MH
Don’t own one yet
Exp
6byears
The next thing is to establish how you want to use the van because if you need any equipment adding to the base package then it would be a good idea to try and get it included in the deal (solar units, extra batteries, extra gas capability, possible gas refill units etc).

IMO if you only ever want to use a PVC for camp sites with a constant electricity supply then a standard van from any dealer will do. However, if you want if for a few off-grid days or longer term off-gridding (as we do) then you'll need solar capability, extra batteries and extra gas. The 12v-only compressor fridge on any Globecar PVC will always zap your power so you'll need the extra juice to run your fridge when off grid.

The Globecar is a fab bit of kit but like any PVC on the market you'll need to add stuff depending on your requirements.

We have a Globecar forum in the Continental section below so check it out when you have a moment.

If you need any info then we'll all try and help.

Good luck,

Andrew
Really appreciating all this input thanks.
We would also be hoping to be off grid most of the time and have thought about solar panel and extra battery. Would diesel heating be a good option, save on gas, or is not an option with globecar?
I notice one of the ones for sale with SMC (Globecar Globescout Plus Pop-top) has a fitted oven. Is this an option with all globecar vans?
Thanks for pointer to globecar forum - off to have a look, need another coffee, maybe upgrade to wine soon LOL
 
Oct 29, 2008
3,688
2,655
West Yorkshire
Funster No
4,712
MH
PVC
Exp
since 2008
Really appreciating all this input thanks.
We would also be hoping to be off grid most of the time and have thought about solar panel and extra battery. Would diesel heating be a good option, save on gas, or is not an option with globecar?
I notice one of the ones for sale with SMC (Globecar Globescout Plus Pop-top) has a fitted oven. Is this an option with all globecar vans?
Thanks for pointer to globecar forum - off to have a look, need another coffee, maybe upgrade to wine soon LOL
We had an underslung gas tank fitted, LPG is cheaper than diesel plus the heaters are quieter and there are no diesel fumes. You can have an oven fitted but we found no need for one. Its amazing what you can cook without one, and we dont miss having one.
 

Blue Knight

Funster
Aug 7, 2017
4,097
2,840
Durham
Funster No
49,879
MH
Ducato Maxi PVC
Exp
Sep 2016
Really appreciating all this input thanks.
We would also be hoping to be off grid most of the time and have thought about solar panel and extra battery. Would diesel heating be a good option, save on gas, or is not an option with globecar?
I notice one of the ones for sale with SMC (Globecar Globescout Plus Pop-top) has a fitted oven. Is this an option with all globecar vans?
Thanks for pointer to globecar forum - off to have a look, need another coffee, maybe upgrade to wine soon LOL
Just like Jez above we didn't bother with an oven. It's a £500 option on any Globecar but more importantly for us we realised that there was no point in having one since we had never actually used the ovens in our previous vans.

If you don't have an oven then you'll get more draw space which in a PVC is really useful.

We have a 2 x 11kg refillable Gaslow system fitted; 2 x L36 EFB batteries and 1 x spare AGM LA95 on a seperate circuit. We also have 120W of solar which IMO is not sufficient for off-grid camping and if we were to keep the van then we would increase the solar capacity to 240W as a minimum.

You'll need an MPPT charge regulator to support the solar and your Truma 4E (leccy and gas heater) is more than enough to keep you toasty.

The Globescout is on the light chassis but if there's only two of you then in theory you should be able to run it comfortably at its registered weight.

As Liz Grianan mentioned above though; if you get a new '2019' model instead of the new 2020 version then you'll save a chunk of money on road tax.

I hope the reading is going well,

All the best,

Andrew

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OP
C
Jan 13, 2020
18
21
Funster No
67,997
MH
Don’t own one yet
Exp
6byears
Just like Jez above we didn't bother with an oven. It's a £500 option on any Globecar but more importantly for us we realised that there was no point in having one since we had never actually used the ovens in our previous vans.

If you don't have an oven then you'll get more draw space which in a PVC is really useful.

We have a 2 x 11kg refillable Gaslow system fitted; 2 x L36 EFB batteries and 1 x spare AGM LA95 on a seperate circuit. We also have 120W of solar which IMO is not sufficient for off-grid camping and if we were to keep the van then we would increase the solar capacity to 240W as a minimum.

You'll need an MPPT charge regulator to support the solar and your Truma 4E (leccy and gas heater) is more than enough to keep you toasty.

The Globescout is on the light chassis but if there's only two of you then in theory you should be able to run it comfortably at its registered weight.

As Liz Grianan mentioned above though; if you get a new '2019' model instead of the new 2020 version then you'll save a chunk of money on road tax.

I hope the reading is going well,

All the best,

Andrew
The Gaslow looks a good system but we live in North West Scotland and LPG stations are unfortunately far and few between.
Maybe forgo oven and invest in more solar power and batteries instead. If we find we really miss the oven, I believe you can get small portable ones.
 

mikebeaches

LIFE MEMBER
Feb 22, 2010
3,079
2,502
Bristol
Funster No
10,377
MH
Rapido V68 Van Conversion
Exp
Since 2009
The vans you have in mind are good. However, it might also be worth looking at Rapido vans (and perhaps the budget brand from the same company - Dreamer).

We've got a Rapido V68. It has 135 litre 3-way absorption fridge freezer, so ideal for off grid camping without 12 volt consumption worries or need for a 220 volt hook-up.

The gas locker holds 2x11kg bottles, so we have one fitted 11kg refillable and a standard 6kg exchange Calorlite as a backup. The refillable means we can buy gas anywhere on the continent or in the UK. System works well.

We don't have the extra weight or cost of an additional habitation battery or solar panels. However, both are popular extras - we just haven't found them necessary.

Good luck whatever you decide.

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Last edited:

GPW

Feb 23, 2019
603
867
Cambridge UK
Funster No
58,720
MH
Globescout Plus
Exp
Slight to minor!
We have the Globescout Plus on a maxi-chassis, so some info, a mini findings dump:

BTW the maxi-chassis + 16" wheel option gives you about 50mm more ground clearance, bigger tyres for rough roads, stronger suspension and better brakes.

The interior has more space than many because there's no vertical cupboard next to the bathroom so you get a spacious bathroom and spacious dinette. It's a really nice place to be TBH. I like the decor, it's european simplicity with a rich wood finish. Details like the right type of catches on the upper lockers and lower drawers are nice. When the 3rd bed option is in use the bathroom also makes a good changing room. Bathroom mods: a suction holder for the shower head, a small bath mat. I shaved 15mm from the bottom of the bathroom door to make space for a carpet I cut to the exact size for the passageway floor and a small (4.7kish) resistor across the bathroom light switch gives a night-light in there (1-2mA is all that's needed).
It needs a strap to store the duckboard in the bathroom too at some point, else if goes under the dinette table as I stuck felt pads to the bottom of it. Also always make sure the pullout bathroom spout/shower is tightened to the hose or it will weep, but it has a trigger mode and is good for showers and washing hair in the tray.

If someone wants to sleep and the other wants to stay up a bit longer we use the bathroom or cupboard door as a divider to form two rooms - it's not designed for that but does work ok. We use a 10" tablet on a stand for Netflix/Youtube stuff, 4G picks up just fine (Vodaphone) on a cheap smartphone just left on the above cab shelf, right next to the USB outlets too. We also leave some cushions up there for insulation which pads the phone. Worked all over europe like that. There's also storage below the dinette table. The electricity box is big enough to take a mains power protector too so I added one of those, switches the EHU off if the voltage goes too high or low.

The fridge is a 3 way manually switched absorption one which means you have to park levelish, for which I check with a levelling App on my phone. But I use it on gas most of the time and the lack of electricity use is handy. It gets pretty cold too, managed to freeze some Muscapone cheese, now we run it around the 3 o'clock mark.. The front of the van tilts down a little so we always park front up the slope and have only needed a 'ramp' (a bit of 2" timber once on a rather hilly site in Germany. I see others parking the other way and using huge ramps - I have no idea why they do that.

The domestic battery is generally good for a 5 day stay without EHU, we switch the power off when out for the day. It mainly gets used for the Truma heating fan but must be charged on mains regularly as it's an AGM one, not a proper Gel one. Power outlets are sparse so I added a 12V and USB into the van trim below the table, easy to route to the EBL119 (Download the circuit diagram, choose the circuit and fuse, buy Mate-n-Lok pins and do it properly, or a correctly placed auto fuse tap will do fine. I have no idea why dealers just hack stuff into random wires). No USB ports in the back.

The chunky side windows are quiet while travelling provided you leave a small gap between the small wobbly plastic handle and the window top or they rattle like mad!! This design is on 3 windows. The bulky (caravan style?) window's advantage is that you can open them in the rain and not get any water in as they overlap the window cutouts each side, it's quite nice seeing the rain pelting down with the window open. I wouldn't want the flush ones having had these.

With the tablecloth folded over the glass cooker and sink tops and things stowed reasonably well the van is very quiet on the move, the 160BHP engine is only doing 2,000rpm at 62mph, has prodigious torque and the cruise makes it easy. We average around 34mpg but mainly do longer journeys at around 60-62 but it will drift up to 70-75mph very easily. It's a very capable cruising machine with a huge range, the leather steering wheel and TPMS is a nice touch too. Don't underestimate the benefits of power either - some very steep roads around the alps, the flat and fat torque is very helpful and nice to have.

The electric side step is useful but being just behind the front wheel gets affected by the mud and dirt so I added drain holes to mine, tape on the top and a rubber plate facing forward to keep it clean. I don't know why Thule makes such a hopeless design, but modded it's great.

Insulation is really quite good but the upper locker corners and roof above the cab is less well insulated, I may wedge in 5mm insulation boards for that. A 15mm pipe insulation tube stops the gap between the rear doors being cold. I also wrapped pipe lagging on the grey water pipes underneath the van so it's less likely to freeze and put two old cushions next to the cassette which keeps the bathroom better insulated. Storage space is pretty good, a months worth of clothes fits just fine. The cupboard above the fridge is short for coats but it's not really a problem, we use a towel rail that hooks over the door for extra hanging space as it's a bit sparse if you don't fit the supplied Globecar hooks (they are grey plastic so i left them in the bag).

The garage area is tricky to get to from the inside so we usually leave the top part/plank open, but I did mod the slides a little (moving them forward a few mm) so they can be slid out without the bed frame having to be moved. We have big plastic containers from Wilco in there for bottles of water etc. for drinking, (making tea, coffee etc.). Also a laundry box lives under there on the left. A small 30cm high aluminium folding step lives next to the built-in wooden one in the passageway as it makes bed exits far easier and doesn't get in the way.

I use bubble wrap on the garage floor as I had it to pad the floor, but of course it also insulates. Lots of air outlets in the dinette and bathroom, one in the mid garage and one at the back, the one at the back is for the bedroom and gets covered by the duvet, sheets etc - I think this is an issue in all PVCs, but a decent double-bed winter duvet keeps warm enough even with frost on all the skylights and the heating idling at 12C.

The gas locker is big enough for 2 big bottles, we have a single refillable and the rest of the space used for the jack, a bicycle track pump for emergencies, a bucket, gas adapters etc. Between the locker and bedroom is a huge cupboard space with shelf, door and top access but not always easy to get to so doesn't get used much. a 5 day winter stay uses between 8 and 11 litres of gas - but more if you stay in it all day of course.

We didn't bother with a windout awning and haven't missed it but the awning light is useful anyway. They only attract wind and go mouldy anyway. Didn't go for solar as I didn't like any of the fitment methods and chose a radio + reversing camera deal instead. Along with the Gaslow - no point in lumping heavy gas bottles around if you're going to buy refillable later. I had to rewire the radio fitment power though, the Peugeot switched and permanent live need correct and careful identificaion - I think they differ from Fiat. The dash airvents slide out straight back to access (stick a screwdriver in and tug it toward the back doors). I also had to stick small gray felt pads - one on the van's headlamp angle switche as the steering wheel is in the way to see them, and two on the LCD rear mirror/camera so I could find the brightness and on/off and camera selection soft touch controls in the dark. With the mirror/camera one of the back windows can be viewed too like a conventional mirror.

So all in all I rather like the Globescout, it's a great layout, a really nice drive and the Plus raises it ahead of the pack - possibly they're even cheaper in Europe - so yes, worth a look, I don't think you'll be disappointed, we're not :D. In the end it was the closest to perfect we found and the cheapest too, but you won't go far wrong with any German PVC in my view, they are all good and the new Peugeot engine is very sweet.
 
OP
C
Jan 13, 2020
18
21
Funster No
67,997
MH
Don’t own one yet
Exp
6byears
We have the Globescout Plus on a maxi-chassis, so some info, a mini findings dump:

BTW the maxi-chassis + 16" wheel option gives you about 50mm more ground clearance, bigger tyres for rough roads, stronger suspension and better brakes.

The interior has more space than many because there's no vertical cupboard next to the bathroom so you get a spacious bathroom and spacious dinette. It's a really nice place to be TBH. I like the decor, it's european simplicity with a rich wood finish. Details like the right type of catches on the upper lockers and lower drawers are nice. When the 3rd bed option is in use the bathroom also makes a good changing room. Bathroom mods: a suction holder for the shower head, a small bath mat. I shaved 15mm from the bottom of the bathroom door to make space for a carpet I cut to the exact size for the passageway floor and a small (4.7kish) resistor across the bathroom light switch gives a night-light in there (1-2mA is all that's needed).
It needs a strap to store the duckboard in the bathroom too at some point, else if goes under the dinette table as I stuck felt pads to the bottom of it. Also always make sure the pullout bathroom spout/shower is tightened to the hose or it will weep, but it has a trigger mode and is good for showers and washing hair in the tray.

If someone wants to sleep and the other wants to stay up a bit longer we use the bathroom or cupboard door as a divider to form two rooms - it's not designed for that but does work ok. We use a 10" tablet on a stand for Netflix/Youtube stuff, 4G picks up just fine (Vodaphone) on a cheap smartphone just left on the above cab shelf, right next to the USB outlets too. We also leave some cushions up there for insulation which pads the phone. Worked all over europe like that. There's also storage below the dinette table. The electricity box is big enough to take a mains power protector too so I added one of those, switches the EHU off if the voltage goes too high or low.

The fridge is a 3 way manually switched absorption one which means you have to park levelish, for which I check with a levelling App on my phone. But I use it on gas most of the time and the lack of electricity use is handy. It gets pretty cold too, managed to freeze some Muscapone cheese, now we run it around the 3 o'clock mark.. The front of the van tilts down a little so we always park front up the slope and have only needed a 'ramp' (a bit of 2" timber once on a rather hilly site in Germany. I see others parking the other way and using huge ramps - I have no idea why they do that.

The domestic battery is generally good for a 5 day stay without EHU, we switch the power off when out for the day. It mainly gets used for the Truma heating fan but must be charged on mains regularly as it's an AGM one, not a proper Gel one. Power outlets are sparse so I added a 12V and USB into the van trim below the table, easy to route to the EBL119 (Download the circuit diagram, choose the circuit and fuse, buy Mate-n-Lok pins and do it properly, or a correctly placed auto fuse tap will do fine. I have no idea why dealers just hack stuff into random wires). No USB ports in the back.

The chunky side windows are quiet while travelling provided you leave a small gap between the small wobbly plastic handle and the window top or they rattle like mad!! This design is on 3 windows. The bulky (caravan style?) window's advantage is that you can open them in the rain and not get any water in as they overlap the window cutouts each side, it's quite nice seeing the rain pelting down with the window open. I wouldn't want the flush ones having had these.

With the tablecloth folded over the glass cooker and sink tops and things stowed reasonably well the van is very quiet on the move, the 160BHP engine is only doing 2,000rpm at 62mph, has prodigious torque and the cruise makes it easy. We average around 34mpg but mainly do longer journeys at around 60-62 but it will drift up to 70-75mph very easily. It's a very capable cruising machine with a huge range, the leather steering wheel and TPMS is a nice touch too. Don't underestimate the benefits of power either - some very steep roads around the alps, the flat and fat torque is very helpful and nice to have.

The electric side step is useful but being just behind the front wheel gets affected by the mud and dirt so I added drain holes to mine, tape on the top and a rubber plate facing forward to keep it clean. I don't know why Thule makes such a hopeless design, but modded it's great.

Insulation is really quite good but the upper locker corners and roof above the cab is less well insulated, I may wedge in 5mm insulation boards for that. A 15mm pipe insulation tube stops the gap between the rear doors being cold. I also wrapped pipe lagging on the grey water pipes underneath the van so it's less likely to freeze and put two old cushions next to the cassette which keeps the bathroom better insulated. Storage space is pretty good, a months worth of clothes fits just fine. The cupboard above the fridge is short for coats but it's not really a problem, we use a towel rail that hooks over the door for extra hanging space as it's a bit sparse if you don't fit the supplied Globecar hooks (they are grey plastic so i left them in the bag).

The garage area is tricky to get to from the inside so we usually leave the top part/plank open, but I did mod the slides a little (moving them forward a few mm) so they can be slid out without the bed frame having to be moved. We have big plastic containers from Wilco in there for bottles of water etc. for drinking, (making tea, coffee etc.). Also a laundry box lives under there on the left. A small 30cm high aluminium folding step lives next to the built-in wooden one in the passageway as it makes bed exits far easier and doesn't get in the way.

I use bubble wrap on the garage floor as I had it to pad the floor, but of course it also insulates. Lots of air outlets in the dinette and bathroom, one in the mid garage and one at the back, the one at the back is for the bedroom and gets covered by the duvet, sheets etc - I think this is an issue in all PVCs, but a decent double-bed winter duvet keeps warm enough even with frost on all the skylights and the heating idling at 12C.

The gas locker is big enough for 2 big bottles, we have a single refillable and the rest of the space used for the jack, a bicycle track pump for emergencies, a bucket, gas adapters etc. Between the locker and bedroom is a huge cupboard space with shelf, door and top access but not always easy to get to so doesn't get used much. a 5 day winter stay uses between 8 and 11 litres of gas - but more if you stay in it all day of course.

We didn't bother with a windout awning and haven't missed it but the awning light is useful anyway. They only attract wind and go mouldy anyway. Didn't go for solar as I didn't like any of the fitment methods and chose a radio + reversing camera deal instead. Along with the Gaslow - no point in lumping heavy gas bottles around if you're going to buy refillable later. I had to rewire the radio fitment power though, the Peugeot switched and permanent live need correct and careful identificaion - I think they differ from Fiat. The dash airvents slide out straight back to access (stick a screwdriver in and tug it toward the back doors). I also had to stick small gray felt pads - one on the van's headlamp angle switche as the steering wheel is in the way to see them, and two on the LCD rear mirror/camera so I could find the brightness and on/off and camera selection soft touch controls in the dark. With the mirror/camera one of the back windows can be viewed too like a conventional mirror.

So all in all I rather like the Globescout, it's a great layout, a really nice drive and the Plus raises it ahead of the pack - possibly they're even cheaper in Europe - so yes, worth a look, I don't think you'll be disappointed, we're not :D. In the end it was the closest to perfect we found and the cheapest too, but you won't go far wrong with any German PVC in my view, they are all good and the new Peugeot engine is very sweet.
Great detailed information. Thank you. We have really appreciated all the replies and are now 80% sure we are going to go with globecar. We have decided to try and visit the show next week to have a final look, especially at alternatives that have been suggested. All the knowledge everyone has provided will be a great help in deciding model and extra options. Been good to get reassurance

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Minxy Girl

LIFE MEMBER
Aug 22, 2007
20,345
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Carthago Cmpct i-138
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Since 1996 we've had Elddis, Swift, Rapido, Rimor, Chausson MHs and Autocruise & Globecar PVCs
We've had two Globecars: a Familyscout L (no longer made) and a Campscout which we px'd for our Carthago in October. The Familyscout had a 3-way fridge, the Campscout a compressor ... to say we hated the compressor one is an understatement! It demanded a lot of electric and even with 2 x 100w solar panels and an MPPT solar controller in Spain over winter it really put a strain on our 2 x 78ah gel batteries, this is with extremely little TV/DVD watching (one x 1 hour a week if that!). It was also noisy and kept us awake at times. Unfortunately even if we were in the market for another panel van conversion I would NOT ever get one with a compressor fridge again so this would unfortunately rule out another Globecar and many other makes too as most camper builders now seem to be using them.

I know others aren't that bothered about their compressor fridge, or use sites where 'feeding' the fridge's demand for power isn't an issue, but we wild camp or used aires so it wasn't ideal, unfortunately we didn't realise how 'unsuitable' it was for our intended use otherwise we probably wouldn't have bought the Campscout in the first place and may have stuck out to try to get a used model with the 3-way fridge in.

One thing to investigate is whether you can 'special order' a Globecar with the larger 3-way fridge in, I believe it used to be an option so may still be the case, this would then get around the compressor fridge issue.

Some info below on our ownership of the Campscout:

 
OP
C
Jan 13, 2020
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Don’t own one yet
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6byears
We've had two Globecars: a Familyscout L (no longer made) and a Campscout which we px'd for our Carthago in October. The Familyscout had a 3-way fridge, the Campscout a compressor ... to say we hated the compressor one is an understatement! It demanded a lot of electric and even with 2 x 100w solar panels and an MPPT solar controller in Spain over winter it really put a strain on our 2 x 78ah gel batteries, this is with extremely little TV/DVD watching (one x 1 hour a week if that!). It was also noisy and kept us awake at times. Unfortunately even if we were in the market for another panel van conversion I would NOT ever get one with a compressor fridge again so this would unfortunately rule out another Globecar and many other makes too as most camper builders now seem to be using them.

I know others aren't that bothered about their compressor fridge, or use sites where 'feeding' the fridge's demand for power isn't an issue, but we wild camp or used aires so it wasn't ideal, unfortunately we didn't realise how 'unsuitable' it was for our intended use otherwise we probably wouldn't have bought the Campscout in the first place and may have stuck out to try to get a used model with the 3-way fridge in.

One thing to investigate is whether you can 'special order' a Globecar with the larger 3-way fridge in, I believe it used to be an option so may still be the case, this would then get around the compressor fridge issue.

Some info below on our ownership of the Campscout:

We are hoping to be mainly off grid so will have to seriously consider the points you have made about the fridge. Thank you. Impressed with the work you have done on the van and we will defo refer to your information if we go with the globecar. We will not go for the campscout though as we do a lot of ferry travel in Scotland and will have to keep to 6m. I would imagine though a lot of the tips and tricks would be relevant to both. This is a great forum, everyone has been so helpful. I am sure we will be taking full advantage of everyone’s knowledge in the coming months.
 

mikebeaches

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Feb 22, 2010
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Since 2009
...We will not go for the campscout though as we do a lot of ferry travel in Scotland and will have to keep to 6m...
There are of course some advantages to keeping within 6m length, including occasionally making modest savings on certain ferries.

However, given how much you will be investing in your purchase, possible additional ferry charges will be minor compared to the discovery that the internal layout doesn't work as well as expected.

It is worth thinking through really carefully how the internal space will meet your needs for living comfortably.

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Blue Knight

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Aug 7, 2017
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Sep 2016
There are of course some advantages to keeping within 6m length, including occasionally making modest savings on certain ferries.

However, given how much you will be investing in your purchase, possible additional ferry charges will be minor compared to the discovery that the internal layout doesn't work as well as expected.

It is worth thinking through really carefully how the internal space will meet your needs for living comfortably.
That would be my take too Mike.

cacbeag Be aware that the '6m rule' only applies to the big ferry routes from Scotland (Scrabster + Aberdeen) to Orkney and Shetland Mainland.

There are several dozen smaller ferries to the outer islands of Scotland, Orkney and Shetland and they all use the '5.5m rule'.

Example: If you were to travel from Aberdeen to Shetland (return trip) using a 6.36m Globecar/Malibu/Rapido PVC then the trip, depending on cabin choice, would cost £500. If you travelled in a sub-6m van then the whole return journey price would only reduce by 20-quid.

You'll be paying about £50,000 cash for your van or £60,000 if done via HP credit so £20 In the whole scheme of things is very little.

To make the 6.36m option even more tasty then be aware that the likes of the Shetland group of ferries only charge for a car rate and not a PVC so they don't even use their own rules - so cheaper again.

We'll be off to Harris and Uist soon and guess what - all of the ferries have a 5.5m rule.

It's not easy choosing a motorhome or PVC; that's for sure.

Good luck,

Andrew
 
Last edited:

Blue Knight

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Sep 2016
We've had two Globecars: a Familyscout L (no longer made) and a Campscout which we px'd for our Carthago in October. The Familyscout had a 3-way fridge, the Campscout a compressor ... to say we hated the compressor one is an understatement! It demanded a lot of electric and even with 2 x 100w solar panels and an MPPT solar controller in Spain over winter it really put a strain on our 2 x 78ah gel batteries, this is with extremely little TV/DVD watching (one x 1 hour a week if that!). It was also noisy and kept us awake at times. Unfortunately even if we were in the market for another panel van conversion I would NOT ever get one with a compressor fridge again so this would unfortunately rule out another Globecar and many other makes too as most camper builders now seem to be using them.

I know others aren't that bothered about their compressor fridge, or use sites where 'feeding' the fridge's demand for power isn't an issue, but we wild camp or used aires so it wasn't ideal, unfortunately we didn't realise how 'unsuitable' it was for our intended use otherwise we probably wouldn't have bought the Campscout in the first place and may have stuck out to try to get a used model with the 3-way fridge in.

One thing to investigate is whether you can 'special order' a Globecar with the larger 3-way fridge in, I believe it used to be an option so may still be the case, this would then get around the compressor fridge issue.

Some info below on our ownership of the Campscout:

That's a good honest post.

We love our Compressor fridge as it's so bloody efficient but it's a bit of a needy child when it comes to off-grid camping.

Our battery set-up helps us massively compared to some but even so we do need to consider the power drain very seriously when it's winter in the Highlands.
 
Feb 18, 2018
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Excellent post
Andrew Blue Knight and mikebeaches.

I think cacbeag is making a good decision going to the show. Sit inall seats including dinette, sit on the loo, brush your teeth, lie on the bed (remembering a pillow makes it several inches shorter), have a shower, make a meal, wash up, dry the dishes ... you get my drift. Take your time to see how the size works for what you want to do. Saying that 6m might work in a transverse bed layout. If that’s your choice then look at the Globecar DK as it has separate shower room.

I have a different view from Minxy Girl about the Compressor fridge. We love ours. We don’t find it noisy at night but usually put it on its night time setting. It worked for us in Europe this summer, in fact we had to turn it down ... I love the fact the ice stayed frozen for my G&T. We have 2 batteries and a solar panel, and using the van most days so we didn’t have any problem with energy consumption. We don’t have a TV yet either. I suppose if you’re not moving for a week you’d need to check it out?

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