Ticks, dogs & pet passports..................

Discussion in 'Pets' started by Mrsambulancekidd, Jul 28, 2016.

  1. Mrsambulancekidd

    Mrsambulancekidd Funster

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    Sorry if this has already been covered.
    Dogs not needing to have tick treatment before returning/visiting the UK is bringing in new problems in the form of the 'brown dog tick'.

    upload_2016-7-28_16-40-44.png

    Disease-ridden ticks are on the rise in Britain after the adoption of more relaxed European pet travel regulations and warmer winters, a leading parasite expert has warned.


    The multiplying and varied tick population is presenting a greater threat to British dogs and their owners.

    Chris Packham, the TV wildlife presenter, is fronting a campaign about the risks of tick-borne illnesses such as Lyme disease, which affects 3,000 Britons a year.

    An expert on the tiny blood-sucking creatures, below, has warned that a new kind of tick that can carry a disease potentially fatal in dogs has arrived in the UK.

    Professor Richard Wall, from the University of Bristol, said the UK had opened the doors to a “really unpleasant” new species after pet passport rules were relaxed three years ago in line with EU freedom of movement regulations.

    Family pets taken on holiday within Europe are no longer required to undergo tick-treatment before returning to the UK.

    Professor Wall said: “There are a couple of European continental species of tick which we are now beginning to see in the UK that we didn’t have before. One is the brown dog tick. It’s started popping up more frequently and that’s a really unpleasant one.

    “They can spread diseases from Europe that we haven’t got in the UK.” The brown dog tick often carries babesia canis, a disease which affects a dog’s red blood cells, causes anaemia and can be fatal. There have been no proven cases so far in the UK.

    Unlike native species of tick – found outside, most commonly in spring and autumn – the brown dog tick lives inside so can breed all-year. It is difficult to get rid of because they can hide away in the cracks of houses.

    Louise McCallum suffered an infestation of brown dog ticks after she fostered a rescue dog from Cyprus. A year later she is still finding them in her home in Houghton on the Hill, Leicestershire.

    “I have two other dogs and I was picking ticks off them every day which was revolting,” she said. “I’m having to be constantly vigilant because there’s clearly a colony here, which is horrific.

    "I was slightly naive as I assumed if a dog comes in from another country they would be treated.”

    Professor Wall said it is vital that dog owners treat their pets for ticks even though it is no longer a legal requirement. “There are good preventative treatments now that will cover animals for eight to 12 weeks, plenty of time for before and after you go away,” he said. “If these ticks continue to get into the UK, we are going to have a much more severe problem.”

    The Big Tick Project, launched by Mr Packham, found the numbers of ticks had increased at 73 per cent of locations surveyed in the UK.

    Whilst the insects are most common in areas with lots of sheep and deer, Professor Wall said they are also becoming more common in urban areas.

    How to get rid of ticks

    The traditional solution of burning the tick to encourage it to reverse out of your skin is no longer advised.

    The best way to banish ticks is by using a special purpose-built hook device. The hook is slid under the tick at skin level to grip the head of the tick then rotated to pull the parasite cleanly out.

    If you try to pull the tick out directly you risk leaving part of its head or mouth inside your body.

    Prevention is better than a cure: you can avoid ticks by wearing long sleeves and trousers when walking in moorland and wooded areas.

    To keep your dog tick-free, groom them regularly to check for infestations. Your vet will be able to recommend a number of options for treatment, including spot-on products and anti-tick collars.

    [​IMG]
    The Telegraph
    By Sophie Jamieson
     
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  2. bellabee

    bellabee Funster

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    Always put a Scalibor on our dog, as recommended by our vet.
     
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  3. sdc77

    sdc77 Funster

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    Great post @Mrsambulancekidd
    We too always use a scalibor collar which we put on about a week before we leave.
     
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  4. Xabia

    Xabia Funster

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    Scalibor for our Cocker too, on about a week before we go and left on for at least two weeks when back in the UK.
     
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  5. Minxy Girl

    Minxy Girl Funster Life Member

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    We use a treatment and a collar with our 3 now - with Lily being 'hyper-sensitive' to the ruddy things we have to be extra careful, however this definitely worked for us this year as despite taking them for some nice long potters in woods etc they didn't get a single tick, very unusual as they normally get a couple or so.
     
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  6. DBK

    DBK Funster

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    We used a Scalibor collar and used Advantix drops on Charlie when away this year (just got back) and he didn't get a single tick in eleven weeks. I did try and check if using both might lead to any problems but I couldn't find anything - and he is still alive. :) But the Scalibor we will leave on him until the end of the autumn, I think you need to take precautions in the UK now, not just when away.
     
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  7. rangitira

    rangitira Funster

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    AnyTick/flea rinse with "Asuntal" (sp?) sorts the tick & fleas out, apply AFTER! Shampoo ! don't rinse! Make sure you wear rubber gloves when applying

    Generally used as a tick/flea rinse for sheep
     
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  8. Hollyberry

    Hollyberry Funster

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    I always thought it was daft stopping the tick treatment. Dogs have to go to a vet anyway for worming tablet, so just as easy, and a few euros more, to have tick treatment.
    All the time we lived in France I used Rose Geranium oil on my dogs. Only had 3 ticks on them in 6 -7 years.
     
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  9. Lot lover

    Lot lover Funster

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    Don't you regularly anti-tick your dogs anyway?
     
  10. DBK

    DBK Funster

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    I think a lot (99.9%?) of folk in the UK don't use things like the Scalibor collar, we didn't in the past but with the increase in nasty diseases I think it is becoming necessary to use something in the UK.
     
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  11. JJ

    JJ Funster

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    More trouble from bloody foreigners hey?

    Once Blighty is out of the EU, the ticks won't be allowed in.

    JJ :cool:
     
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  12. Stagman

    Stagman Funster

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    We tried that rose geranium oil and a tick attached itself no more than an inch from the application area.....
     
  13. Stagman

    Stagman Funster

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    We live in rural north essex and this summer we hVe pulled more ticks of the dog than we have in the last 3 years. We have no sheep here. There are rabbits of course and some wild deer.
    Very worrying as the Babeosis (probably spelled wrong) disease was confirmed in Harlow, Essex on a dog that died.
     
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  14. Stagman

    Stagman Funster

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  15. Lot lover

    Lot lover Funster

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    Nor do we. At one time used Advantix and Frontline liquid applied to the skin but both dogs found this an irritant so now it's a Next-Gard tablet. Must be flavoured with La Poste as it's always swallowed quickly.

    Our garden attracts rabbits and deer and there are sheep nearby so they are done every month in the summer and 6 weekly thereafter.

    I have no idea why DEFRA stopped anti-tick treatment, do you think it knows?
     
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  16. Minxy Girl

    Minxy Girl Funster Life Member

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    When the rules were relaxed our vet told us that she couldn't understand why the tick treatment had been stopped as it is that which causes the most problems, whereas the worming is, and always has been, much less of an issue.

    In France isn't there a requirement to do worming treatment regularly now?
     
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  17. Zoppydog

    Zoppydog Funster

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    We use Bravecto, needs a vets prescription. We walk our Springer in woodland twice a day, touch wood, she never had a tick since we started it two years ago now. Before that we would find tics almost everyday!
    I do buy it on line, even paying for the script, it works out cheaper.
    Chris
     
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  18. Mack100

    Mack100 Funster

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    We were given Bravecto in France last year and got it from our vets here in UK this spring.
    Seems very effective without the skin irritation he used to get from the other stuff.
     
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  19. kcy

    kcy Funster

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    Wow after 40 years of pulling the little buggers off the dogs and myself and now having read all this have decided to do something about it.
    Stop reading
     
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  20. Mack100

    Mack100 Funster

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    Just don't take the Bravecto yourself
     
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