What kills motorhomes?

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by ericonabike, Apr 2, 2014.

  1. ericonabike

    ericonabike Read Only Funster

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    Mine is a 2007 Autocruise Starseeker. It is, so far as I can tell, in perfect condition, and has done some 25,000 miles. But mileage seems a false indicator for 'vans - if it had been made into a delivery van I'd expect it to go round the clock a couple of times at least. There isn't much metal to rust and the chassis has been waxoyled. So what ages it and will eventually kill it off?

    Perhaps it's using it - maybe we should record occupancy days, as being more important than mileage. Or even not using it - should we make a note of how much we DON'T use it? It's a serious question as I want to keep this van for a long time. What strategy is best and what is to be avoided?
     
  2. WillH

    WillH Funster

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    I reckon not using a van is worse than using it, okay, you'll get wear and tear more than if it's idle but like a car, it's meant to go.

    Rgds
    Bill
     
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  3. chaser

    chaser Funster

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    Mines a 07 as well with 31000 on the clock, but aren't planning on ever buying another, don't see why it shouldn't go on for years, as it's still same as new inside and as you say mechanicals should be good to go round the clock easy, so don't see any probs , look at how many vans are about from the eighths and nineties it'll need wear and tear stuff but don't they all:cry:
     
  4. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    Three things

    Damp, damp, damp..


    everything else can be maintained, repaired or replaced.. .. but if damp gets a grip and the rot not dealt with... kaput.. it becomes too expensive to repair.. unless it is a classic and has intrinsic value.
     
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  5. ourcampersbeentrashed

    ourcampersbeentrashed Funster

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    damp and non-availability of parts xxxx
     
  6. DeuceBG

    DeuceBG Funster

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    That's a fact Jim but also leaving it idle for weeks or even months on end will do for it in time.
    Like all things mechanical, once they've been run for the first time they need to be used on a regular basis otherwise brakes / clutches seize, batteries can drain, oil seals dry out and leak and cylinder bores rust.
    Use it as regularly as possible would be my advice.
     
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  7. geo glasgow

    geo glasgow Read Only Funster

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    i had a wee bit bit of a leak

    i had a small leak
    for a couple of weeks i had a leak from the large skylight on the roof,
    sussed it and sorted i even popped it fully out got into the roof cavaty pulled out slightly damp but not bad insulation ,refilled once i dried it out,
    resealed and complete, good job done,
    however there is no smell or damp i have checked however does anyone recommend a good dehumidifier on the uk market for around £100 mark,
    thanks
     
  8. Tea Bag

    Tea Bag Funster

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    Hi.
    If you are very,very careful, you could...... LOVE it to death:Wink::Wink::Wink:
    Tea Bag
     
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  9. ericonabike

    ericonabike Read Only Funster

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    Damp...what causes the ingress? I'm careful about keeping everything inside aired over winter, but what else is likely to create conditions where damp can appear?
     
  10. Mastercamper

    Mastercamper Read Only Funster

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    This is absolutely spot on. :thumb:
    Laying up for the winter is the worst possible scenario in my opinion.
    Regular maintenance, lubrication and a good coat of `looking at` are also v. important.
    Diesel engines thrive on hard work coupled with sympathetic maintenance.
    Most important is to enjoy it, and the freedom and new horizons associated with it.:Wink:
     
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  11. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    when driving over rough uneven ground the body flexes , we've all seen it, a wooden frame will twist and flex.. this can and will eventually open up wall joints. ..

    It will depend a lot on the type of construction.. a metal or fiber glass box is less likely to leak than a timber framed box clad in aluminum ..

    damp comes in through bad joints.. as they age the sealer hardens and cracks.. body joints, window seals.. around any piece of roof furniture.. especially roof lights.. (walking on the roof can cause leaks around roof lights). and just about anywhere the walls have been cut to fit something.

    You rarely find damp in a fibre glass roofed vans or panel van conversion.. and if there is damp, it is less likely to cause irreversible damage.

    Prevention is always better than cure.. body and window seals should be looked at every year and if required replaced by removing the old mastic and redoing.

    so.. for me at any rate.. my first choice of van is a fiberglass construction..

    my last European van had a fiberglass roof and walls.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2014
  12. daisy mae

    daisy mae Read Only Funster

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    I am hoping that my monoquoc sp body MH will last me , had new windows fitted when I bought it, so should be fine on the damp issue, have seen bad water ingress in the first caravan that we bought in 1989, cost over £2000 to put right, did last for many years afterwards, but when it came to a MH I went the grp route and so pleased I did.:thumb: I am looking after it, mechanically as well as inside.
     
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  13. sdc77

    sdc77 Funster

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    Has to be lack of use that kills them.. Mechanically anyway.. Not experienced damp thankfully.. I don't really expect to by regular use and maintenance
     
  14. cruiser

    cruiser Funster Life Member

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    I keep my at home so have a elec lead to it .and put a small heater in it to keep it dry .as some one has said don't let it get damp.i have had mine from new.1990.and it is still going well.24 years new.:thumb::thumb:
     
  15. maz

    maz Funster

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    I am firmly of the opinion that it is cycling that kills off motorhomes. All that bouncing about of bicycles on racks each time you go over a bump - that back wall is going to give way at some point. :RollEyes:

    Then there's the buildup of static electricity throughout the van, caused by the persistent wearing of lycra. Combine that with a teensy-weensy leak of LPG or a gassing battery - BOOM! :Eeek:

    It has been established that the main cause of damp in motorhomes owned by cyclists is the excess humidity produced by sweaty lycra, combined with the washing of said lycra and hanging it in the shower to dry. :wub:

    Hope this helps! :BigGrin:
     
  16. cruiser

    cruiser Funster Life Member

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    oh good lets all run the bikers over.no more damp.well a few tried to get under the wheels of my trucks over the last 40 years.not got one yet.oh well never mind.:Rofl1::Rofl1::Rofl1:
     
  17. chaser

    chaser Funster

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    I know this was only in jest but bike carriers must strain something, there was one on mine but when I saw the flexing with a bike on I took it off, and never put it back.
    Il manage without biking anymore:BigGrin::BigGrin:
     
  18. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    Warmth inside will not stop Killer Damp. I know. Our damp was in the side wall bottom rail inside a locker. Water got in at the joint between the wall and the side skirt, as intended by the Germans, though the Germans had hoped it would run away from the wood but their thin plastic DPC seal did not work.

    Buy a damp meter and use it everywhere including underneath.

    Catch it early and it's relatively easy to cure.

    But "24 years on", you've got a good 'un there.
     
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  19. cruiser

    cruiser Funster Life Member

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    chaser you don't let some sit on it before you take it of.:BigGrin:
     
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