Suggestions please.

Discussion in 'Photography' started by ShiftZZ, Oct 19, 2013.

  1. ShiftZZ

    ShiftZZ Funster Life Member

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    I have been struggling taking pictures of moving water.
    Examples below (not mine)
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Any suggestions, tips?

    Ta
     
  2. Peter & Elaine

    Peter & Elaine Funster

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    I have no idea but
    The first picture is a belter
     
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  3. Munchie

    Munchie Funster Life Member

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    Camera on a tripod, camera set on manual, small aperture (f22?) various shutter speeds till you get the one you want.

    I take a few at different settings to get the one I want. Overdone looks terrible. :thumb:
     
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  4. Wildbill

    Wildbill Funster

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    i think it is sutler speed digital is to slow you nead shorter exposure time have you tried sport setting
    may be wrong but it may help
     
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  5. Wildbill

    Wildbill Funster

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    bump to fast on key bored for me :thumb:
     
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  6. ShiftZZ

    ShiftZZ Funster Life Member

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    Thanks Ken, tried before and they always look washed out...
     
  7. Munchie

    Munchie Funster Life Member

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    You need a longer exposure to "blend" the flow. hence the tripod. If washed out sounds like aperture too large. :Smile:

    As I said set aperture to smalles possible for your camera/lens then vary shutter speeds. Take lots at different shutter speeds....not an exact science, depends on ambient light.
    :thumb:
     
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  8. Munchie

    Munchie Funster Life Member

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    Been sifting through my photos how about this one taken near Ingleton?
     

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  9. bungy

    bungy Funster

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    Do you have a polarizing filter? well worth getting one if you haven't

    Can really make a difference for shots like this

    General stuff though...possibly teaching you to suck eggs..but just incase

    • Set the camera to Manual mode.
    • Use a small aperture. starting with f/16 and then going smaller if needs be - be carefull though as most general use lenses lose sharpness the smaller the aperture (high end lenses dont tend to but piggin expensive)
    • Use the lowest ISO speed on your camera. - less noise and wider dynamic range
    • Start with a shutter speed of a few seconds and adjust to get the effect your looking for - lots of experimenting needed to get the exposure right and avoid under exposure or blown highlights...if your camera supports it - use the live histogram to get the balance :BigGrin:
     
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  10. Munchie

    Munchie Funster Life Member

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    Yep agree mine is a wee bit blown in the centre but it is a "balance" for the overall effect.
     
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  11. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

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    I was quite pleased with this one. Settle last July.
     

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  12. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    It's all down to exposure time and if slow enough to blur you need a tripod. Problem today is not many cameras allow you to set the exposure time.

    This was hand held at about a 15th. Grantown on Spey.
     

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  13. MikeandCarolyn

    MikeandCarolyn Read Only Funster

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    Well,all the answers have been posted-I think,that without any examples of yours,it's been assumed that the problem you are having is with achieving the correct (for your interpretation of the scene) amount of water movement.
    That's a shutter speed issue,and can really only be sorted by trial and error,bearing in mind that at exposures below around 1/125 sec on a standard lens then some sort of support would be a good idea to avoid blurring other bits as well:BigGrin:
    Exposure is a whole can of worms-it is governed by 4 main factors,the ambient light,the ISO rating,the lens aperture and the shutter speed.
    Ambient light will be what it is on the day. ISO rating you can usually set yourself,generally the lower the better,someone mentioned Dynamic Range,that's basically about getting detail into shadows and highlights at same time which is usually what we want-BUT ISO rating also affects Aperture and Speed-the lower the ISO rating the more light needs to get through the lens.
    Aperture is the hole in middle of lens that lets the light through :BigGrin: The bigger that is,then the faster the shutter speed and vice versa.
    Shutter Speed is how fast shutter opens and closes-the higher the shutter speed the more movement you can capture without blurring.
    Aperture and Shutter Speed are directly linked ie,1/125 @f8 give same amount of light as 1/250 @f5.6
    Histogram was mentioned,basically a linear representation of the image-it can be altered in Photoshop.
    Back in the Day we had a 'characteristic curve' of the film you were using and the object of the excersise was to get your image on a certain part of that curve depending on the result you wanted-you would hear things like "I'll expose for the highlights,and the shadows can take care of themselves"
    Today we can adjust highlights and shadows in photoshop.
    So,once you understand what you are actually trying to achieve it only gets easier :Rofl1:

    Notice how low the camera is on that first shot,and how wide angle the lens is.Also the verticals are vertical,so camera is level.
    Image seems to be as sharp as a nits nacker from a***hole to breakfast time-oops "pin sharp from back to front" :BigGrin: That would tend to indicate a small aperture as 'Depth of Field' increases as aperture gets smaller.
    Do not confuse 'depth of field' which is in front of lens,with 'depth of focus' which is behind lens.

    Oh dear,got a bit carried away there :BigGrin: Never mind,hope there's something there which might help.

    Mike
     
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  14. Jim

    Jim Ringleader

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    You need a tripod and a neutral density filter, which will allow you to get the exposure you need:thumb:
     
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  15. Bluemerle

    Bluemerle Read Only Funster

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    Not much to add, as most has already been said. However whilst a tripod is really useful it is not essential. you can brace yourself and your camera against something solid, ie, wall,gatepost,rock, treetrunk etc. Also a beanbag really useful, stand it on the ground or a rock and sit the camera on it.

    Using the time exposure setting will stop any camera shake from pressing the shutter button.

    The great thing about digital, if it aint right, delete it and try again.

    Have fun:BigGrin:
     
  16. Geo

    Geo Trader - Funster

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    Simples, Make the water move slower:thumb:
     

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  17. Campercaillie

    Campercaillie Read Only Funster

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    As previously stated: You'll need to go to manual setting - Smallest aperture (F22 or F32, better still), this will ensure maximum depth of field, particularly (as in the first photo) you intend to place some nice autumn leaves in the foreground for effect :Wink:!! ....Then it's just a case of experimenting with slow shutter speeds, start off with a second or two, and go longer. Others have mentioned tripods, but at slow shutter speeds just the action of pressing the shutter button can at times be enough to blur your "autumn leaves" in the foreground. Avoid this by setting delayed shutter release, or use a shutter release cable if your camera is suitably equipped.
     
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  18. sedge

    sedge Funster

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    Just picturing my papa, taking a snap of Swallow Falls when I was about 4 or 5, holding his breath, with his Brownie box camera left set at max exp (it was a metal lever thing on one side of it) balanced on the handrail post of a swing bridge whilst it waited to expose.

    My ma and us had to stand on the path either side to stop anyone else encroaching !

    Was an excellent B/W (what else would it be LOL) pic, as one he took of 'his girls' as our reflection in a very shiny and clean chrome car hubcap - but of course when ma got dementia she destroyed practically all photos either not displayed in a frame or specially kept (eg her 'mother's' albums of our weddings) EXCEPT dad's pics taken when he was serving with the Royal Pay Corps in India. Hence our childhoods and most of their married life disappeared completely from view along with the pics of one set of the Victorian great grandparents complete with maid, coach and coachman! (He owned a wharf)

    Do for God's sake, ask your parents if you can have their pics NOW.
     
  19. thraxugrut

    thraxugrut Read Only Funster

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    Some great tips on here. it's pretty much all been said but I needed an excuse to post one of my photos... so here you go :p

    One tip though, it's been discussed, ambient light. If you don't have a neutral density filter then forget about blurring out water like in those shots presented in to OP unless it's dawn/dusk. There will be too much light even if you can set ISO to 50 and aperture to 32 (and suffer the sharpness/diffraction issues).

    It's better to chose a suitable time and overcast helps :) or just spend $100 on a ND filter and be done.

    You mentioned washed out. That sort of sounded like overexposed? I'll echo what's already been said, post some samples and some more direct advice could be given.

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. sedge

    sedge Funster

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    Fab pic - where is it?
     

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