Patterdale Terrier not a good traveller!

Discussion in 'Pets' started by Jack Slipper, Apr 26, 2016.

  1. Jack Slipper

    Jack Slipper Funster

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    Hi, we've recently bought a new motorhome and have plans to travel around the UK and France over the next 12 months. Problem is our lovely Patterdale Terrier Tess isn't travelling well. We've tried most things including recently buying a Thundershirt and pet calming spray, liquid sedative ect none of which work. She pants incessantly from beginning to end despite being on her favourite blanket in her bed. Tried having on my wife's knee but no change. It's really worrying us now as we really don't want to have to leave her behind. On arrival at the destination she jumps out and all is well immediately. This has been an issue in the car previously, we thought the environment of the motorhome might change things but sadly it hasn't.

    Any thoughts or tips would be much appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. Dogeared

    Dogeared Funster

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    We had exactly the same problem with our cairn. Previously she loved travelling with us anywhere. Numerous times in the car to France. She appears to find the noise behind her disturbing.

    Don't laugh at what we have done, but we folded the foam seat from a garden reclining chair so that it went between the front cab seats in a U shape, put a foam front edge on it, she now lies 'harnessed between the front seats, on a cushion and lies with her chin on the front piece of foam.
    She settles down quickly on long runs, on bumpy roads she gets a bit nervous still, but that is quickly resolved by placing a towel over the top of the U shaped cushion. Appears to make her feel more secure.

    Seems a lot of messing, but the foam easily pushes into the front well on the cab when we are parked up.

    As you can see from the photo, she now loves travelling

    Hope you work something out.

    Barry
     
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  3. Jack Slipper

    Jack Slipper Funster

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    Thanks very much for the reply. It's good to know were not alone with this one! Will try anything to settle her down to be honest. Did wonder about the fabric type of crate to provide her with a feeling of security. Really hope we can sort this as she's always been a part of our early retirement plans. She's so good when we get there and such good company.
     
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  4. Ralph-n-Bev

    Ralph-n-Bev Funster

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    Our other Motorhome was quite noisy with squeaks and rattles . Even after packing things well etc.
    Pug isn't as bad squeak wise as we've built him a lot more solidly , plus there's a lot more insulation in him than regular built vans. So that keeps out a lot of outside noise.
    Ruby our old dog always travelled well. Buster On the other hand would pace up and down panting whilst she slept.
    We bought a fabric crate, put a memory foam dog bed in it and zipped Him in. Wedging the crate between the u shape seats in the back. He never goes to sleep , even on very long trips.
    He always wants to go in Pug, getting excited when we say " are you going camping!" So he's not scared of the van. It's the movement I think , he doesn't like. He goes in the fabric crate willingly too.
    The crate has stopped him panting and pacing. But he still doesn't sleep. Ever. No matter how long the trip is. Then when we stop , he gets out for a wee, and a walk , then wants to sleep. But as soon as we set off, he wakes up!
     
  5. Allan & Loren

    Allan & Loren Funster

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    Our Tilly was a terrible traveller too and still not good in the car but we got her a soft igloo type bed that squashes behind the passenger seat to encase her. As soon as we start the engine she jumps in her bed, settles down and sleeps. Took a few journeys though so I'd say persevere and I hope Tess settles too.

    Loren
     
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  6. Jack Slipper

    Jack Slipper Funster

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    Thank you - I think it's worth giving some form of covered crate/ igloo bed a try then
     
  7. John Laidler

    John Laidler Funster

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    There is a training method but it will be time consuming. If you can train the dog to use a crate in the house then it will help a lot.

    Then put the dog in the crate in the MH but don't try driving anywhere. Work up from just running the engine to a short drive of a hundred yards or so and then gradually longer journeys. Drive slowly and above all try not to get stressed yourself as the dog will pick up on that immediately.

    There are also calming techniques which can be used.

    I suggest contacting your local vet and asking them to recommend a local dog trainer who will do a few one to one lessons.

    I've had dogs around me all my life and didn't think anyone could teach me anything about dog training but I was completely wrong as I found out when I took our mutt to a professional dog trainer. It was a revelation.
     
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  8. Cal54

    Cal54 Funster Life Member

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    I don't have this problem thankfully, but do believe that the dog in a comfortable confined area will settle better - basically they have less to worry about. I have a fabric crate which my dog is happy with when it has to be used.
     
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  9. Minxy Girl

    Minxy Girl Funster Life Member

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    Patterdales are highly strung and natural 'guard dogs' - they feel they must protect the rest of the 'family' consequently they tend to be more alert and notice noises etc more than other dogs.

    Our Lily wasn't too bad but she got very badly frightened on a ferry and since then has got worse and worse - we once had a 6 hour drive (with breaks) and she panted and shook the whole way and wouldn't settle at all! However one time when we were on holiday and travelling it was the lack of this 'usual' behaviour that told us something was seriously wrong with her ... she was just sitting on my knee without any panting or shaking at all - we'd taken a tick off her in the morning and it turned out she had a very bad reaction to it and we nearly lost her! o_O

    We've tried sedatives but she just fights them, thunder shirt, bribery, etc and there's nothing that we've found that has really works for her. The only thing that she likes to have access to, when we're not travelling, is a 'safe space' which for her is under the L-shaped sofa in her favourite bed - creating a 'safe space' as has been suggested might therefore work for other dogs that haven't actually been frightened as our Lily has.

    Some people swear by thunder shirts (and other makes) but as our Lily is used to clothes (she was dressed up when she was a pup by her previous owner) and likes to dress-up normally ... yes really ... she is very fine coated and feels the cold so I have a few t-shirts etc for her to wear if its cool in the camper otherwise she ends up squeaking at us in the night to get under our duvet! If I go in the unit where her t-shirts are kept she always wants to put one on! Unfortunately though, as having wearing 'clothing' is nothing 'new' it doesn't calm her which is a shame.

    Image060.jpg Image065.jpg
     
  10. TheBig1

    TheBig1 Funster Life Member

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    As above, basically what I would advise is already said. However I will add that we had a very neurotic rescue staffie who was previously abused. Being very experienced with dog behaviour, it was our wish that we find a technique to calm him, if not cure him. Creating a covered "den" helped but on vet advice we resorted to carrying antihistamine tablets that we used to safely sedate him before journeys or fireworks or other predictable triggers. We used to buy hayfever tablets from the chemist or pound shops as the chemicals are safe and identical to the vet prescribed alternative. Helps when the vet is a personal friend to get such advice.

    learnt behaviour can be carefully and slowly be retrained, but automatic fear and stress behaviour is always going to be a bigger challenge. Learning coping strategies and adapting calmly is the key to giving your neurotic dog a happier life
     
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  11. Jack Slipper

    Jack Slipper Funster

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    Thanks for all the advice folks - very useful.

    Minxy Girl - your Lilly is almost identical to our Tess in the way she acts and looks! Will add some photos later. We did extensive research on the breed so knew exactly what we were getting with her. Apart from the travelling issues she's a brilliant dog.
     
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  12. Jack Slipper

    Jack Slipper Funster

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    Tess.JPG
     

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  13. bellabee

    bellabee Funster

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    @TheBig1 That's very interesting about the anti-histamine tablets. Can you tell us what would be the appropriate dosage for eg a medium-sized dog?
     
  14. TheBig1

    TheBig1 Funster Life Member

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    medium sized dog is one tablet and lasts 4 hours. adjust accordingly for miniature and giant breeds. It is also not instant and takes 15-20 minutes to begin sedating, so dont rush to up the dose thinking it has not worked
     
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  15. jockaneezer

    jockaneezer Funster

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    We bought a pheremone ? collar for one of ours when it was a pup as it was nervous, Val was convinced it did the trick, I'm not so sure, but he is fine now.
     
  16. Hollyberry

    Hollyberry Funster

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    My daughter has a Patterdale and he sits in a crate in the very back of her Galaxy, surrounded by pushchair, scooters, kids bags, God knows what and there's never a peep from him, so not necessarily the breed of dog.
    Cass (fluffy crossbreed in avatar ) was a hysterical traveller until I got Holly. Never had a problem since and they've travelled 1000s of miles.
    The fabric crates are easily destroyed --- daughters Patterdale ripped the front clean off the one they put him in on his first night with them.

    Try sitting in the motorhome with him, give him his food in there while you chat, eat, drink tea etc... Then start with a well padded crate ( wire or a pladtic and wire Airsure type) and just give him a treat or two while you eat, drink, chat, watch TV.
    The pheromone spray worked with my cats, never had to try a dog one but worth a try.
     
  17. Minxy Girl

    Minxy Girl Funster Life Member

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    Can you please clarify WHICH antihistamines you're talking about as they come with different chemicals in them?

    The below couple of links give some info about giving antihistamines to dogs which, importantly, also tell what the possible reactions can be ... there are risks associated with giving any medications so it's wise to be aware of the warning signs just in case:

    https://www.vetinfo.com/choosing-antihistamine-dogs.html

    http://www.antihistamine.com/articles/dog-antihistamine-dosage.html
     
  18. TheBig1

    TheBig1 Funster Life Member

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    we always used benadryl but as Mel says be aware all medicines have side effects. If you are worried you should take veterinary advice
     
  19. John Laidler

    John Laidler Funster

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    If I understand you, the antihistamines are being used because of their sedative side effect?
     
  20. kcy

    kcy Funster

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    How old is she, is this Puppy thing?I think it bothers you more than her, as you say when you get there she jumps out and all is well. Make her secure and forget it. I'd be more concerned if at the end of the journey she was still fretting
     
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