Invertor

Discussion in 'Tech/Mech General' started by Briarose, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. Briarose

    Briarose

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    Hi one of my Neighbours have just asked what is the best and which type of inverter you'd need for powering things such as a 750 watt microwave, a laptop, 1200 watt hairdrier and the price you'd expect to pay?

    As we haven't got one of these we have no idea ? can anyone answer the question.
    Many thanks
     
  2. JeanLuc

    JeanLuc Funster

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    Well the 1,200 watt hair-drier needs a 1,500 watt inverter to allow for the inefficiency that is present in these devices. Similarly, a microwave rated at 750 watt has a start-up power requirement of much more than that - can be double the rated figure. So again a 1,500 watt inverter is indicated. Then there is the issue of whether to install a pure sine wave model (mimics the 230V mains wave pattern very closely) or a quasi-sine wave version that is a compromise. Certain appliances do not like quasi-sine wave power: things like induction motors (as found in fans) and some LCD TVs. There is a huge cost difference between the two types. As an example, RoadPro sell Sterling inverters - a good make. The 1,800 watt quasi-sine wave model is £338, whilst the 1,500 watt pure sine wave version is £950.

    Finally, your friend needs to consider battery capacity. A 1,500 watt inverter will draw a current of around 150 amps from a 12 volt battery. That means the typical 80 Ah battery fitted as standard in a lot of motorhomes will last for half an hour before it is completely dead. And as batteries should not be fully discharged (in order to prolong life) it means the inverter on full power will run for about 15 minutes. I would suggest an absolute minimum battery capacity in excess of 200 Ah would be required to make it a usable proposition. And with a current of 150 amps flowing, the cables used to connect inverter to battery(ies) need to be very thick or they will burn out.

    Philip
    For more advice I suggest your friend talks to someone like RoadPro (link to inverter page below)

    RoadPro Inverters
     
  3. Briarose

    Briarose

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    Thanks for that I will pass on the info.
     
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