Interesting book on computers. Aimed at Beginners

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Gromett, May 16, 2013.

  1. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    This is an old book aimed at getting people up to speed on machine code and assembly language but it explains the internals of (an old) computer in really simple terms.

    I think if you have even the slightest desire to learn about how computers work on the inside this would be an interesting read?

    http://gomsx.net/hansotten/msxdocs/machinecodeforbeginners.pdf

    Let me know how you get on please.. :BigGrin:
     
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  2. chaser

    chaser Funster

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    Never got past programming a spectrum but it always seemed more complicated than the old " if go to and similar commands so never tried any more" :Doh:
     
  3. WynandJean

    WynandJean Funster

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    A fascinating book, as you say. Still a very complex subject, though.

    Wyn
     
  4. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    Nothing worth doing is easy..

    It may make you scratch your noggin a little bit but I thought it was one of the best intro books I have ever seen. Also as it is based on the old 8 bit computers it keeps it simple...

    The first couple of chapters do a good job of explaining the internals I thought without getting into so much detail as to over complicate things.
     
  5. ShiftZZ

    ShiftZZ Funster Life Member

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    Old Mo has just PM'd me, he has read the book (well Judy helped with the big words) and he has designed, programmed and compiled a new killer app, to get rid of 99% of all viruses, he has named it Domestos..

    Sales at the mo are very liquid...

    Karl, most funsters have problems getting dressed by themselves in the morning, the chances of any of us being able to write a programme (besides one or two aging geeks) is slim, more chance of getting ScotJim to run naked through Govan, with a Blue Tory Rosette tattooed on his willy urging them to vote for a pre op Lithuanian trannie, peat digging, Burstner owning Conservative.
     
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  6. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

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    THIS is what we used to use in the 1970s/80s for brand new trainees taken on straight from school and people from outside the IT department who were taking the first step to learning how to write their own report programs.
     
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  7. Peter & Elaine

    Peter & Elaine Funster

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    What's a trannie surely it should be transit ?
     
  8. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    I think you might be surprised as to how many funsters wouldn't mind stretching themselves a little even if they have no intention of changing career :Wink:

    This book won't teach you how to program but will give you an insight into what is going on in that magic box of tricks.

    As GJH says the book is aimed at those with no knowledge of computers.. :thumb:
     
  9. 1_man_and_his_dob(lo)

    1_man_and_his_dob(lo) Funster

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    Wow....I'm not 100% certain, but I might have read (and quickly forgotten) that book when it first came out. 1983 would have been a year or two after my parents bought a VIC-20.

    Oooh....I'm getting flashbacks to spending hours typing in assembler/machine code listings from computer magazines and then one typo causing the whole lot to lock up :swear:
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2013
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  10. Taran_Las

    Taran_Las Funster

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    Simplest program for an IBM 360/370 mainframe consisted of the following statement:

    BR 14

    For those who remember(GJH), the supplied program was called IEFBR14.

    I'll get my tweed jacket .........:Rofl1:
     
  11. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    Nice... Another bit of computer trivia to add to my list.
    Bit more exciting than the RTS or NOP on the 6510 I learned on. It does more as well :thumb:
     
  12. ShiftZZ

    ShiftZZ Funster Life Member

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    Stretch themselves!!!! , they are arthritic at best, are you trying to kill them?

    The odds of Old Mo understanding anything that does not involve a lump hammer, concrete mixer and WD40 is not worth the effort..

    One of the best programmers I ever met was RobC (Atari fame) complete geek.
     
  13. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

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    I knew I should never have shown you that green card :Laughing:

    I'd forgotten all about IEFBR14 - but it is a long time since I got my hands into mucky code. Requirements Definition is much easier than programing (as well as being the important bit) :BigGrin:
     
  14. Taran_Las

    Taran_Las Funster

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    It ain't changed any in all those years:Rofl1:



    :Rofl1::Rofl1:Oh really?:Rofl1::Rofl1:
     
  15. Deckard

    Deckard Read Only Funster

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    Wow someone else did this?!?!?!

    I started with Z80 and moved to 6502 - they didnt have a compiler at the time - so I wrote one in BASIC - took ages - as any errors, just crashed the pc dead :cry:

    I did eventually write a number of games which i sold to Imagine software and ...heck there was another i forget now (Ocean?)- but i made good money for a college boy :thumb:

    I have written some VBS stuff recently and I wouldnt mind getting my head around coding again - what would you suggest gromett?
     
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  16. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    It would depends what you want to achieve?
    Fun,
    Fun with the possibility to make some pennies,
    Self employed future programmer,
    Business based programmer.
    Web based programmer.

    There are as many options as there are ideas.:thumb:

    I can give you some suggestions if you give me a little bit of an idea what you want to do
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2013
  17. Deckard

    Deckard Read Only Funster

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    Had a good think about this....as i plan to be more or less full time by the end of the year, I am looking for alternative employment options...

    So, agency or self employment is the only realistic option....i am thinking maybe java and/or android? As for type of work.....i dont mind as long as keeps the Hymer topped with diesel and food :thumb:
     
  18. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    I would check out the freelancer job sites. This will be the quickest way to pick up quick jobs. There is some competition out there. This would give you fast experience and get yourself a reputation. It is worth keeping a tech blog as well as this can generate quite a few jobs leads from google search.

    I would look for short jobs at first that you can pick up and finish quickly. this will then dictate what you would need to learn. You may only get £10-£100 each for them but once you develop a good reputation more work will come in through recommendations.

    If I was looking I would look for quick php dev jobs. Or server admin jobs. But this is what I am good at.

    If I was starting from scratch I would start learning in 3 areas
    1) for quick jobs - I would probably stick with PHP. There are lots of website developers out there with no programming ability and you can drop in and do things like form to mail, custom mysql stuff. or add on modules for wordpress and drupal. Ajax/javascript is also handy for this type of work.
    2) I would then look for projects for the medium term (6-12 months) and this is where I would put probably a lot of my time. Based on my current interests I would go with Android Development. As this is a subset of Java it would also mean that long term learning Java and polishing up my C++ would be easier.
    3) Long term (1-2 years) I would be looking for a Major project to get involved with. My current thinking is to specialise in a particular part of linux rather than being a generalist. My currrent thoughts are to learn everything possible about postfix and write a couple of extension modules. I could then pick up work as a specialist postfix consultant. There are literally 100's of Linux components to choose from. Pick one that is essential to hosting providers or people with dedicated servers and you have a captive market.

    You never know though, you may pick up enough of the quick and dirty jobs to make an easy living and not progress to 2 or 3.

    I personally like to have many arrows in my quiver.

    I currently run a small hosting company and do some server admin and security consultancy on the side. But I would love to get back to the dev world as providing support 24/7/52 becomes a bit of a ballache after 15 years of doing it.
     
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