Having a Stroke and what to do.

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Don Quixote, Jan 22, 2016.

  1. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Funster

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    If you suspect that you or someone else is having a stroke, phone 999 / 112 immediately and ask for an ambulance.

    Anyone can have a stroke, although there are some things that make you more at risk than others.
    Many people think that strokes only happen to older people but stroke can strike anyone at any time.
    Whilst most people who have a stroke are older, younger people can have strokes too, including children. One in four strokes in the UK happen in people under the age of 65.


    Even if the symptoms of a stroke disappear while you are waiting for the ambulance to arrive, you or the person having the stroke should still go to hospital for an assessment.

    Symptoms that disappear quickly (and in less than 24 hours) may mean you have had a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) (mini stroke) and you could be at risk of having a full stroke in the near future.

    After an initial assessment, you may need to be admitted to hospital to receive a more in-depth assessment and, if necessary, for specialist treatment to begin.


    Recognising the signs of a stroke
    The signs and symptoms of a stroke vary from person to person but usually begin suddenly. As different parts of your brain control different parts of your body, your symptoms will depend on the part of your brain affected and the extent of the damage.

    The main stroke symptoms can be remembered with the word FAST: Face-Arms-Speech-Time.

    • Face – the face may have dropped on one side, the person may not be able to smile or their mouth or eye may have drooped.
    • Arms – the person with suspected stroke may not be able to lift both arms and keep them there because of arm weakness or numbness in one arm.
    • Speech – their speech may be slurred or garbled, or the person may not be able to talk at all despite appearing to be awake.
    • Time – it is time to dial 999 immediately if you notice any of these signs or symptoms.
    It is important for everyone to be aware of these signs and symptoms. If you live with or care for somebody in a high-risk group, such as someone who is elderly or has diabetes or high blood pressure, being aware of the symptoms is even more important.

    Other possible symptoms
    Symptoms in the FAST test identify most strokes, but occasionally a stroke can cause different symptoms.

    Other symptoms and signs may include:
    • complete paralysis of one side of the body
    • sudden loss or blurring of vision
    • dizziness
    • confusion
    • difficulty understanding what others are saying
    • problems with balance and co-ordination
    • difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
    • a sudden and very severe headache resulting in a blinding pain unlike anything experienced before
    • loss of consciousness
    However, there are usually other causes for these symptoms.

    'Mini-stroke' or transient ischaemic attack (TIA)
    The symptoms of a TIA are the same as a stroke, but they tend to only last between a few minutes and a few hours before disappearing completely.

    Although the symptoms do improve, a TIA should never be ignored as it is a serious warning sign there is a problem with the blood supply to your brain and means you are at an increased risk of having a stroke in the near future.

    Please cut / paste / print this simple card and put in your wallet, purse or stick on the cupboard door of your motorhome. One day it might save a life.

    FAST.png
    There is an "App" all be it american and free in the app store for iPhones:
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/spot-a-stroke-f.a.s.t./id594995265?ls=1&mt=8
    and for Android:
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=au.com.n6.stroke_us_android&hl=en
    All advice from NHS UK.
     
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  2. Ambilkate

    Ambilkate Funster Life Member

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    Thankyou for posting this John x
     
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  3. Taran_Las

    Taran_Las Funster

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    Thanks for the reminder.(y)
     
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  4. Puddleduck

    Puddleduck Funster

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    A stroke is caused by lack of blood to the brain. This can be due to either a block or a bleed (plug or leak). Aspirin is useful when there is a block but would make a leak worse.
     
  5. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Funster

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    PLEASE do not give aspirin UNLESS you are qualified to do so - ASPIRIN is NOT A TREATMENT for stroke.
    The simple answer is – no! Aspirin should not be given initially to a patient suspected of having a stroke.

    This is because there are two forms of stroke:

    1. Ischemic stroke: this is similar to a heart attack and occurs when a clot blocks an artery in the brain causing ischemia and infarction of brain tissue (death of cells due to lack of oxygen)

    2. Hemorrhagic stroke: this is rarer, but occurs due to a burst blood vessel in the brain resulting in bleeding
    Types-of-Stroke.jpg

    Aspirin works by making the blood less ‘sticky’. It is great for breaking down clots, however could worsen any bleeding into the brain.

    When someone has a stroke you don’t know which type of stroke they are having! There is no way of knowing if the stroke is ischemic or hemorrhagic. Therefore we don’t know? if aspirin will help or cause harm.

    The only way to find out the type of stroke is a brain scan performed in hospital.
    Therefore the best first aid treatment for someone with a suspected stroke is to call for emergency services / help as soon as possible. IF you give a drug you MAY risk stopping the drug that the QUALIFIED staff in the hospital can use and DELAY treatment.

    Please READ my post in detail as it direct from NHS UK.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2016
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  6. Finvarra

    Finvarra Read Only Funster

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    Dave is allergic to aspirin, it will send him straight into a severe asthma attack requiring emergency treatment, I hope no well-meaning person would ever give him aspirin.

    Lesley
     
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  7. DanielFord

    DanielFord Funster

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    Just as an aside, it is worth checking for a medical bracelet or pendant, or perhaps in the wallet of the patient. There is another condition which presents in exactly the same manner, but is totally harmless. I know this because I suffer from it. It's called hemiplegic migraine I actually have a card that I hold up to concerned people, it says:
    HEMIPLEGIC MIGRAINE SUFFERER
    I will be unable to speak at onset, please treat with NSAIDS (ibuprofen) in my inside pocket.
    Thanks
     
  8. alfandM

    alfandM Funster

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    Hi Don,A very well written and informative ,and folk should keep it ,for a fast first aid guide,and folk remember, F, A, S,T, it could save a life,so thanks again for sharing ,Best regards Regards Alf. PS, i have been a victim.
     
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  9. Khizzie

    Khizzie Funster

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    I have same allergic reaction to asprin and all its derivatives including ibrufruven ,and like you hope that no well meaning soul administers it to me ..I have a sign stating such in the motorhome just in case ..Roy
     
  10. Mattyjwr

    Mattyjwr Funster Life Member

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    Do you have a Med alert bracelet? Peeps might try and give aspirin should you have or appear to have a heart attack. They shouldn't force aspirin on you but they are unlikely to look around your motorhome to look for signs etc if you're being treated.
     
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  11. Finvarra

    Finvarra Read Only Funster

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    Dave wears a tag around his neck all the time stating not to give aspirin, but I wonder how many people would look in an emergency.

    Lesley
     
  12. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Funster

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    Lesley, you would be surprised how many look. There is a bracelet as well that he can wear.

    Try Amazon:
    41wQBAtVzKL._SY300_.jpg
     

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  13. Khizzie

    Khizzie Funster

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    No I don't ,but I will get one.thanks. the sign in motorhome is taped to one of the overhead lockers which contains all my medication for my copd.plus a first aid kit..Roy
     
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