getting access to leisure battery (fiat 2006)

Discussion in 'Tech/Mech General' started by lunarman, Feb 17, 2009.

  1. lunarman

    lunarman Funster

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    I need to change the leisure battery on my van, it is located under the drivers seat. I have looked at how to get it out and wonder if anyone here knows how to remove the seat to allow access.

    The seat appears to bolted to the frame using 4 alan type bolts though the swivel. However the nuts are hidden behind carpet covered ply wood panels that are themselves trapped behind 2 lugs and seem to be put in when the seat frame is installed, and I cannot get a spanner on them.

    The seat frame appears to be held to the floor by 2 large nuts which are easily accessible but I cannot see what secures the rear. So I do not know whether undoing them will enable removal of the seat and frame complete.

    Is there any easy way of removing the battery?
     
  2. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    Mmmm.......second one tonight :Wink:

    slide the seat fully forward.....IN the runner channel, at the rear are two allen/star type bolts.....remove.

    slide the seat back....at the front, on the seat BASE, are two more bolts, actually in the FRONT of the BASE. maybe difficult to get to if the base has been trim-covered. remove those.

    the swivel is bolted to the channels and the bottom of the seat and will come away complete with channels.

    the seat box does not come out.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2009
  3. Manouche

    Manouche Read Only Funster

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    Under seat batts

    I've got the same situation, two leisure batteries under the driver ad passeger seats.
    Originally they were Gel and must have lasted 8 years, I am presuming they were the originals, since they were dated 2000 and thats how old the van is.
    I have recently replaced them both, due to failure of one of them, but could't afford the gel replacements (mntce free)

    To get to them is not too much hassle, two allen bolts and two ordiary ones, but the seats have to be then slid forward to gain access and they are a bit on the heavy side.

    I was thinking of moving them to the under settee storage box for ease of access, although they would add weight to that side of the van ad would be next to the gas bottles (although obviously on the inside).


    So, after all that, how often do you think it is necessary to check the levels in the batteries, I do find myself putting it off. (is this a "how long is a piece of string question") ?:Confused:
    Oh , this is on a B584 Hymer
    Cheers





     
  4. iceni

    iceni Read Only Funster

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    I find that once every 6 months is ok. In spring (mar apr/ and again at the end of the main season Sept/oct) With batteries there is usually a fill leven indicator inside each cell but the battery experts say dont fill it all the way up as you need to allow for expansion...so just coveing the plates is advised. bear in mind though that if you park on a hill for any length of time the cells in one end may be uncovered if the battery is lengthwise down the van.
    Are your batteries vented to the outside.

    Phill
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2009
  5. Manouche

    Manouche Read Only Funster

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    Thanks Iceni
    Yeah, I've vented them through the floor.
    If every few months is OK I won't bother moving them.


    I'll spend the next few years saving for some more gel batteries !
     
  6. JeanLuc

    JeanLuc Funster

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    Although they cost more than standard lead-acid batteries, the latest from Elecsol are sealed and maintenance-free. They are a lot cheaper than Gel. I had a coupe of 110AH fitted in December and so far, they seem pretty good. Still had them vented through the floor though in case of a cell failure towards end-of-life that can cause 'gassing'.
     
  7. Manouche

    Manouche Read Only Funster

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    Thanks JeanLuc
    I did consider lots of options before parting with my hard eaned.
    Now that I've spent the dosh I'm hoping they'll last a few years at least
    and I guess by then, the technology would have moved on a bit
     
  8. Tony Lee

    Tony Lee Read Only Funster

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    But since ever having the plates uncovered is extremely ill-advised, I suggest maintaining the level to where the makers intend - and that is level with the bottom of the split ring around each opening. The only exception is if the plates have become uncovered and the battery is flat. THEN the plates should be just covered, the battery charged to near full and then the level topped up to the indicator rings. Reason given is that all the bubbles and heating cause the electrolyte to expand so if they are topped up to the correct level first off, they may overflow while under heavy charging

    How often you need to top up depends on several factors but overcharging is one of the main problems. Only likely to happen if you hook up a cheap taper charger and leave it connected for a long time (or your good charger fails, or the battery fails). The engine battery is not so likely to have problems because the system deliberately undercharges the battery, but the leisure battery should always be fully charged and this may cause slightly higher electrolyte use.

    As for the advisability of having flooded cell batteries sitting within the living area, you need to make up your own mind whether to heed the manufacturers warnings.
     
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