Fiat Comfortmatic

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by FIDGET, Jun 17, 2012.

  1. FIDGET

    FIDGET Funster

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    Hi All, Just read in Practicl motorhome page 80, re fiat comfortmatic,they say and I quote, "it's important to note that you can't drive a comfortmatic-equipped ducato, if you only hold an automatic -only license because the transmission's lack of Park position means it doesn't qualify as an automatic "
    Any thoughts on this , as I doubt if garage's selling these vehicle's ( if this is correct ) bother to point this out to customers or ask which type of license they have. Terry
     
  2. cpease

    cpease Read Only Funster

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    Very good point
     
  3. jb0371

    jb0371 Read Only Funster

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    I would assume that its up to the buyer to ensure they have the correct license, as whenever i have bought a bike or car they have never asked me if i have the correct license.

    Probably going to get ribbed on this next comment:

    How many people only have an auto license and how many of them would be the owners of a mh.
     
  4. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    This is from the DT1 form given to DSA examiners m this is what the official guidelines state regarding automatic transmissions:
    can be downloaded from here http://www.dft.gov.uk/publications/dsa-dt1-standard-operating-procedure
    <<
    6.8 VEHICLES WITH AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
    A vehicle with automatic transmission is defined in regulations as `A vehicle in which the gear ratio between the engine and the wheels can be varied only by the use of the accelerator or brakes'. [HI]In general a vehicle without a manual clutch is regarded as an automatic.[/HI]

    The following points of driving technique are common to all automatic systems:

    HANDBRAKE
    The handbrake should be applied for temporary stops, e.g. waiting at a red traffic light, a junction, or in a traffic hold-up, if they are likely to be of a long duration
    Short stops may not require the application of the handbrake
    The handbrake may need to be applied to prevent `creep'
    Faults committed in these cases should be recorded at Handbrake

    FOOTBRAKE AND ACCELERATOR
    The use of the right foot for both brake and accelerator pedals has considerable safety advantages. It is therefore recommended practice for normal driving, but is not necessarily applicable to disabled drivers. The use of the left foot on the brake pedal should not however be marked as a fault unless it involves the use of the footbrake against the accelerator
    The use of both feet when manoeuvring in a confined space is acceptable if carried out correctly, i.e. speed is properly adjusted so that no large throttle opening or heavy braking pressures are involved.
    Any fault should be recorded at footbrake and/or Accelerator, or in the 'control' box if it occurs in the reversing, reverse parking, or turn in the road exercise

    6.9 PARTICULAR DRIVING SYSTEMS

    FULLY AUTOMATIC SYSTEM
    This type has selector settings for forward and reverse, neutral and/or park. It also has settings which enable the driver to select and retain a particular gear ratio or range of gear ratios, e.g. to obtain engine braking when descending a steep hill, although gear changes are normally made automatically. Most automatics of this type enable the driver to make an immediate change into the lower gear, to obtain extra acceleration, by means of `kick down' or part throttle operation actuated by the accelerator pedal. In nearly all cases the selector lever is mounted on the floor or the steering column in the position normally occupied by the gear lever, but there are exceptions, e.g. a panel of press buttons on the facia.

    SEMI-AUTOMATIC SYSTEMS
    With these the driver has to select the gear required by movement of the gear lever as with a manually controlled gearbox, but there is no clutch pedal. [HI]For driving test and licensing purposes these vehicles are regarded as automatics.
    [/HI]
    PRE-SELECTOR SYSTEMS
    In these the gear is selected, before it is required, by manual movement of a selector lever, which is normally mounted on the steering column. When required, the gear is engaged by a single depression and release of the gear-change pedal, which is situated where the clutch pedal would be on an orthodox transmission.

    6.10 `THE CLUTCH' AND `GUIDOSIMPLEX'
    These adaptations enable a vehicle to be driven in manual or automatic mode. The candidate can choose which mode to drive the vehicle in and if successful should be issued with the appropriate DSA10.
    Disabled candidates may use the vehicle for a test in automatic mode as a means of overcoming their disability. If successful, the candidate should be issued with a restricted licence in the usual way.

    6.11 CENTRIFUGAL CLUTCHES AND FREE-WHEEL DEVICES
    Vehicles fitted with these devices do not fall within the definition of vehicles with automatic transmission. The use of a free-wheel device or centrifugal clutch in addition to a pedal-operated clutch is at the discretion of the candidate.

    6.12 SUBARU `HILL HOLDER' CLUTCH
    The `hill holder' clutch is fitted to manual versions of the Subaru Legacy estate and saloon models. Drivers are advised that when stopping on an incline they should take their foot off the brake pedal while keeping the clutch pedal depressed, this automatically engages the `hill holder' which prevents the vehicle from rolling back. To move off the driver selects first gear, releases the clutch and drives on in the normal way.
    Note: If any doubt exist about whether a particular vehicle is a manual or automatic, advice should be sought from Technical Standards Branch at HQ. This enquiry should be made prior to the start of the test and the candidate informed of the decision before starting the practical drive.

    6.13 CITROEN XM PARKING BRAKE
    Citroen XMs are fitted with an `emergency and parking brake`. This brake is operated by the driver pushing in a control fitted under the offside face vent and depressing an additional foot pedal situated to the left of the clutch pedal on the manual model and to the left of the brake pedal on the automatic version. The parking brake is released by pulling out the control fitted on the dash.
    The emergency brake can be operated by applying the additional pedal, which will operate the brakes without power assistance. Drivers are advised not to drive with the release control pushed in when driving normally.
    >>
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2012
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  5. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    Many older American RV's don't have a parking 'pawl' but are still automatics.

    i think the authors info is incorrect.
     
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  6. Wizbangs

    Wizbangs

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    We got stuck in a traffic jam on a long uphill, the comformatic box won`t hold the MH on the hill, so it was really hard work. I used the handbrake, but it is so far to reach down to use it. I started using my left foot to brake instead. It felt really strange. I have a full license though haven't driven a manual for years. I have never had an auto before that won't hold the vehicle on a hill. It is so annoying, maybe not a big deal for many, but almost a deal breaker for me.
     
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