Ducato 1.9td running temperature

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Busterbulldog, Jun 7, 2012.

  1. Busterbulldog

    Busterbulldog Read Only Funster

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    Have recently replaced the thermostat assembly,thermistor,fan switch and relay due to the truck running around 60C continuously.The truck now runs around 94 degrees now,but gets hotter on hills 100 or so,then fan kicks in, and cools right down on long hills,as low as 60 again.Its a 1995 ducato 1.9td,I find temperature movement unusual to this degree on a relatively modern engine,is it normal or is there maybe another stat or something I may have overlooked? Does the gauge stay stable on other trucks of this age once warmed up?
     
  2. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    sounds like the stat temp is too high.
    you could try a cooler thermostat.....I dont know what the standard stat is but as an example.......78deg instead of 88deg

    the stat will open slightly sooner but the fan will still kick in at the correct 'i'm too hot' temperature if needed.
     
  3. wivvy's dad

    wivvy's dad Read Only Funster

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    Okay - rolls up sleeves......

    This has been a well documented phenomenon on Honda ST1100 Pan European motorcycles. I also found it on a number of BMW motorcycles, and assorted cars.

    The short version: The length of small bore hose from the thermostat housing on top of the radiator to the catch tank is the culprit. Over time, this perishes, and gains microscopic holes. When hot coolant is forced into the catch tank, all is well and good.

    But once the engine is switched off, and coolant travels back into the radiator, it picks up a tiny amount of air along with the coolant. Gradually over time, more and more air is trapped in the radiator, and less and less coolant. As this diminishing level of coolant has to do more work, the temperature of it rises, and rises more quickly, in exactly the situations you describe - up hills etc.

    The cure is simply to replace the length of rubber tubing from the side of the thermostat housing to the catch tank which is probably mounted on the inner panel of the wing, or similar. Fush and bleed the cooling system, and all should be well.

    I have in the past replaced the standard rubber tubing with armoured fuel hose with excellent results, whether it be two or four wheeled vehicles.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2012
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  4. Busterbulldog

    Busterbulldog Read Only Funster

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    that sounds feasible,i expect the hoses are all original, I shall investigate that hose ty
     
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