CO Detectors

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Gooney, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. Gooney

    Gooney Funster

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    I've just read Jims post 'Don't die in your sleep' and thought I'm OK I fitted a detector last year, I then read Peters (Johns Cross) post 'Safety in your van' where it was recommended that a detector should be fitted approx 4ft from the floor.
    The detector I bought is hard wired into the leisure battery circuit and the recomendation in the instructions were for it to be fitted at floor level which I have done. Reading Peters post had me checking several different sources on line and some say they can be fitted any height because CO is about the same density as air and others say their preferred location is at about 1.5 metres height. I read the Kidde fitting manual online and they seemed to say at 1.5 mtrs so you can read the digital display easily.
    Can anyone tell me do I need to relocate my alarm?:wooo:
     
  2. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    True, CO is very similar in density to air...very slightly heavier....but the warm, thermal air movement, no matter how small, in the van will lift the CO to high level so fitting at high level will still detect the CO.

    UNBURNT LPG will sink to the lowest point so an LPG leak detector should be placed as low as possible and definitely lower than the bed.

    on my RV, as is common to RV's, the gas is controlled by an electronic gas detector positioned just below the kitchen base units....if it detects unburnt gas it turns off the main LPG tank's electronic valve
     
  3. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    Most CO detectors are manufactured for domestic use , and also the instructions are for the same application . I would recommend you to install the detector at sleeping head height this way you should be safe also dont put it too close to any appliance :thumb:
     
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  4. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    Oooooo!!! conflicting views........... FIGHT !!! :boxing:
     
  5. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

  6. Johns_Cross_Motorhomes

    Johns_Cross_Motorhomes Trader - Motorhome & Accessory Sales

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    Caravan Councils guidlines! (I pinched the original post from Motorroamers:Blush:)

    a) Fix to a wall 15cm to 20cm below the ceiling, if possible higher than any door or window,
    b) Do not install a CO alarm in an enclosed space (in a cupboard, behind a curtain or
    temporary curtain) or where it can be obstructed (by furniture, partitions etc.),
    c) Not directly above a sink,
    d) Not next to a door or window, an extractor fan, an air vent or similar ventilation opening,
    e) Not where dirt and dust could block the alarm,
    f) Not in a damp or humid location,
    g) Not in the immediate vicinity of the cooking appliance.
     
  7. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    The problem is that if you follow any of these guidelines then the detector would probabally be out in the awning unless you have got a large rv .:thumb:
     
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  8. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    3.2 Siting an Alarm SECONDARY FACTORS

    It may not be possible to meet all of these factors, but they should be considered to choose the optimal site.

    a) Fix to a wall 15cm to 20cm below the ceiling, if possible higher than any door or window.




    while it could be wall mounted, and preferable, its more pleasing on the eye if its ceiling mounted, but never place any type of detector on a ceiling close to a wall...its usually 'dead air' and the detector may not sense a problem.

    the other recommendation of 1 to 1.5 metres above ground could lead to a large build-up of CO at high level before the alarm sounds.
     
  9. Gooney

    Gooney Funster

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    Thanks for the advice and links given above, I've searched out and found the fitting instructions that came with my detector. The detector is a Dual Sensing gas detector made for Discover Leisure (no warranty now) because of the different types of gas to be detected the instruction for fitting is rather vague, I think I will scrap the unit and buy a dedicated CO detector and as highlighted by Stagman build an extension on the side of my M/H to fit it in.
    Thanks again:thumb:
     
  10. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    Tie it around your neck ... :thumb: :Laughing:
     
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  11. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    http://www.aico.co.uk/siting-carbon-monoxide-co-alarms.html
     
  12. Douglas

    Douglas Read Only Funster

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    For what its worth, the CO detector in my house, as fitted by the MOD is on a wall 6" from the ceiling.

    Doug...
     
  13. Reallyretired

    Reallyretired Funster

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    A combined gas/CO alarm is probably not a good idea as the best position for these are different.
    My CO detector is about 10" below the ceiling, while the gas detector is about 1" above the floor
     
  14. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    I always find and recommend one detector to do one job it's a lot less confusing :thumb:
     
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