Carbon Monxide detector positioning

Discussion in 'Heating and Air-Conditioning' started by Ridgeway, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. Ridgeway

    Ridgeway Funster

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    What's the thinking on the positioning of a CO detector within a MH ?

    I'd always thought that CO is heavy and that a detector should be low down or perhaps it should be near the heater ?

    Any thoughts on this ?
     
  2. CHRI$

    CHRI$ Funster

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    i fitted mine at 90cm above the floor:thumb:
     
  3. Ridgeway

    Ridgeway Funster

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    Near the heater or just in the habitation ?
     
  4. Reallyretired

    Reallyretired Funster

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    High up, only gas detector low down :)reel:
     
  5. CHRI$

    CHRI$ Funster

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    near the hab/bed area about 1mt away from heater,fitted as recommended on the packageing:thumb:
     
  6. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    Carbon Monoxide is heavier than air, but only just.

    the warm air convection currents from the heat source will carry the CO to a high level so the detector should be positioned at high level.

    my factory installed CO detector/auto gas shut-off controller is around 1.4mtrs above floor level in the bedroom.



    unburnt LPG (leaking gas pipe/joint etc) is much heavier than air so will always sink to the lowest point, so an LPG detector should be installed as low as possible.

    the factory installed LPG detector/auto gas shut-off controller is at floor level in the kitchen area.
     
  7. CHRI$

    CHRI$ Funster

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    allways follow the manufatorers guidelines on the packageing as not all co2 detectors are the same:Smile:
    some requie fitting high up some lower,mine is lower:thumb:
     
  8. Ridgeway

    Ridgeway Funster

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    Yeah that's why I asked as mine came without any location recommendations...
     
  9. JeanLuc

    JeanLuc Funster

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    Sorry to contradict Pappajohn, but I believe CO is slightly lighter than air:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide
    Therefore the detector should be fitted higher, rather than lower. The earlier comments about convection currents apply too.
    The instructions that came with mine said it should be fitted away from flame sources and if in a bedroom at around head height.
    In the event I fitted it in the main habitation area on a vertical wall just below ceiling height. I felt this was a reasonable compromise.
     
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  10. CHRI$

    CHRI$ Funster

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    in laboratotry conditions CO is indeed lighter than air just ,but when LPG burns it gives off water vapor ,mix that in with CO it then becomes heavier than air,its not pure CO that kills you in a motorhome, it a very dirty CO mixed in with a load of other chemicals that kills you.
    hence the need to have a CO detector no higher than 1800mm,or six foot and no lower than 900mm or 3 foot.
     
  11. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

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    When I bought CO detectors for house and van a couple of years ago they came with fitting instructions from the manufacturers. When I bought a combined CO/smoke detector for the current van this year it too came with fitting instructions from the manufacturer.

    I simply followed those instructions as closely as possible. It's always a slight compromise in a van with a product which is primarily designed for house use but not difficult at all.
     
  12. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    Instructions that come with a CO detector are mainly for household use ,and the requirements can't always be used in a motorhome due to it's far smaller size therefore Papajohn would be pretty much correct ,also check this out http://www.aico.co.uk/images/stories/PDF_Documents/Ei205_Instructions.pdf . :thumb:
     
  13. dave newell lvs

    dave newell lvs Trader-Vehicle Services

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    Carbon Monoxide (CO not CO2) has approximately the same density as air. however as its presence in a motorhome will be a direct result of gas combustion it will be warm and therefore slightly lower density than the surrounding air and lighter. The most likely appliance to cause CO inside the motorhome is a gas powered fridge that is burning dirty (more common than many people realise) and not room sealed, most are like this. So a CO detector should be positioned around 1.5-1.8 metres high and near to the fridge position but not close to a hob or oven.

    D.
     
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  14. Ridgeway

    Ridgeway Funster

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    OK thanks for all the replies. In the end I did find the fitting instructions in the packaging, they were very well hidden...

    As mentioned by many people the instructions are for homes and therefore I wondered what people had done in their MH, looks like the 1500 - 1800mm height seems good and also near fridge but not too near hob etc

    Will be done today !
     
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  15. camper

    camper Read Only Funster

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    keeping warm

    The heating in my van needs an electric hookup.
    I asked my dealer what to do if no elec supply and he said just turn a gas ring on.
    I wasn't happy with this and generally shiver if it's the only alternative.
    But why is it any worse than having the gas on for cooking.I open the roof vent when I'm cooking but is this enough? I know I could open windows but that seems a bit daft when you're trying to get warm- or is a slight opening enough to dissipate fumes?
    When I stayed on a Cand C site recently, I noticed they hand out calor gas heaters-quite small with small gas cylinder on the back- to people staying in wooden pods.Is this risky too because there;s no flue?
     
  16. Reallyretired

    Reallyretired Funster

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    Are you sure. I have never come across a motorhome with only electric heating. Some are gas only, some gas or electric.
     
  17. camper

    camper Read Only Funster

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    electric only

    yes, definitely.There;s just a fan heater arrangement set under passenger seat,

    Is it different because it's a campervan not a motorhome?
     
  18. Barclaybasher

    Barclaybasher Funster

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    Absolutely not!!


    Gas rings used for heating campers have killed.

    I would only use a catalytic gas heater in a confined space - no flame - and importantly one with an oxygen depletion device which will automatically switch off the fire if the oxygen levels in the van fall too low.

    Using a gas ring will not only give off CO but uses up the oxygen in the van.


    If you have to - stay cold - and alive !!


    Catalytic heater at


    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Mini-Catalytic-Cabinet-Calor-Gas-Portable-Heater-/140816681907#vi-content
     
  19. camper

    camper Read Only Funster

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    burstner

    But why is it ok to use the gas ring for cooking?Surely it only gives off the same fumes.

    I'm not disagreeing with you but wonder why there aren't multiple deaths from this.When you think of all the caravans and motorhomes that use gas rings and there must be plenty of occasions when there's little ventilation.Surely there needs to be a warning in every vehicle that's sold because it sounds more lethal than not wearing a seat belt and look at all the publicity about that.
     
  20. camper

    camper Read Only Funster

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    edit of my post


    I mean in that maybe they don't fit alternative heating, not that I think the fumes are less dangerous
     

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