Touring in Turkey

Discussion in 'Continental Touring' started by Kaya Koyu Walker, Dec 13, 2008.

  1. Kaya Koyu Walker

    Kaya Koyu Walker Read Only Funster

    Jul 7, 2008
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    UK passport holders can purchase multiple entry visas at any port of entry or border crossing into Turkey.

    The cost is £10 or 15 Euros and the visa is valid for 90 days.

    Travellers should be aware that exceeding the 90 day limit, even by 1 day, will result in a substantial on-the-spot fine by the Pasaport Polis on exit.

    Green Card insurance for foreign registered vehicles is mandatory and can be purchased if necessary at all ports of entry and border crossings.

    On entry, the vehicle's details are entered on the driver's passport and it must leave the country at the same time as the driver. The vehicle may be kept in Turkey for a maximum period of 180 days, but, see the post above regarding the 90 day visa.

    If motorhomers want to spend more than 90 days touring Turkey it's possible to exit the country and leave the vehicle in a customs compound at the point of exit. However, this is a long drawn-out process, with fees involved and the necessity, in most cases, for a translator and lots of patience.

    In reality, it's far easier to exit into Greece, Bulgaria, Armenia, Syria etc. with the vehicle and then immediately re-enter, purchasing a new 90 day.
  2. Sunty

    Sunty Read Only Funster

    Dec 10, 2008
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    Couldn't agree more with these comments. We were in Turkey this year when a friend of ours had an accident on one of the (Asian) Turkish motorways. Beware - they were only covered for breakdown & recovery in Eurpoean Turkey! Ordinarily the vehicle would have been written-off but because of the entry/exit rules it had to be recovered and taken to the border crossing to leave Turkey with the owner. It was picked up at the Greek border and conveyed to UK only to be written off here. The expense is massve so ensure you are covered in Turkey in Asia as well as Turkey in Europe for breakdown and recovery.

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