What do you clean your fresh water systems with (1 Viewer)

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Oct 22, 2019
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I have bought a seasonal water purifying additive for the fresh water system but it doesn’t say anything about lime buildup removal etc

Was thinking of adding some white vinegar before flushing though .

Any ideas or tips ?
 

Lenny HB

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Oct 18, 2007
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I always use white wine vinegar, I put about 3-4 lt in the tank and about 10 lt of water. Flush through until the boiler tank is full then turn the water on hot and leave it for an hour or two. then flush thoroughly with fresh water. I do it once a year.
 
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Lenny HB

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Oct 18, 2007
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Citric acid, its okay with the truma boiler, mix 1kg with warm water and empty into 20 litres water in tank flush though system and leave overnight, flush into dirty tank and leave overnight.
If you use citric acid don't leave it in the boiler too long it attacks stainless steel.
 
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Jan 19, 2014
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I used 1kg of citric acid left in for 48hrs, tank is spotless now, as new 👍

Before and after:

Screenshot_20230129_164306_Gallery.jpg
Screenshot_20230129_164525_Gallery.jpg

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Oct 12, 2009
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I have bought a seasonal water purifying additive for the fresh water system but it doesn’t say anything about lime buildup removal etc

Was thinking of adding some white vinegar before flushing though .

Any ideas or tips ?

We just use fresh water. MH is 20 years old and no problems.

I empty whole system and reckon sub-zero temperatures in winter kill off any bugs.
 
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Two on Tour

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I always use white wine vinegar, I put about 3-4 lt in the tank and about 10 lt of water. Flush through until the boiler tank is full then turn the water on hot and leave it for an hour or two. then flush thoroughly with fresh water.

Your leaving it hot in your boiler for a couple of hours does not sound ideal. :think: :wink:

"Does vinegar react with stainless steel?​

Vinegar does react with stainless steel and causes the metal to corrode. Vinegar is good for cleaning plastics and glass, but it reacts with rubber and metal and damages their structure. Long-term exposure to vinegar, table salt, and chlorine can damage metal utensils.
Indeed, vinegar can be destructive to metal. Thus, remember to rinse everything completely after you have cleaned it. On the off chance that you splash vinegar on it and wipe it off quickly, it is an exceptionally powerful cleaner.
Be careful not to leave the vinegar on your utensils or appliances for too long as it can damage the stainless steel.
Never leave stainless steel to absorb solutions that contain chlorine, vinegar, or table salt, as keeping stainless steel in them for a long time can damage it."
 
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Feb 16, 2020
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Citric acid, its okay with the truma boiler, mix 1kg with warm water and empty into 20 litres water in tank flush though system and leave overnight, flush into dirty tank and leave overnight.
Make sure to flush plenty of fresh water through taps, that citric mix can be quite sticky, and if left to dry seize the taps, as I found out :rolleyes:
:blush:
Mike.

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Apr 19, 2019
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No wear near as corrosive as citric acid, White Wine Vinegar is what Truma used to recommend before they brought out their own cleaner.
I'm afraid that's not exactly true. If you had said not quite as corrosive then I would have agreed.

Corrosivity is a complex subject. Where we are talking about acid corrosivity then the corrosivity is proportional to a combination of the strength of the acid and the concentration of the acid.

Both citric acid and acetic acid are weak acids. There weakness is derived from their ability to dissociate (ionize) in water. This is a good definition

A strong acid is an acid which is completely ionized in an aqueous solution. Hydrogen chloride (HCl) ionizes completely into hydrogen ions and chloride ions in water. A weak acid is an acid that ionizes only slightly in an aqueous solution.

In the crazy and exciting world of acids they are both weak and acetic is slightly weaker.

However the corrosivity of the acid is strongly influenced by its dilution. So even a marginal difference in strength will overcome any difference in their relative chemical weakness.

When we consider stainless steel, any acid will corrode it. The rate of corrosion of it will again be dependant on the strength of the acid and its concentration as well as the time exposed. But the same applies to limescale. So anything that dissolves limescale by acid attack will corrode stainless steel.

The conclusion is that you can use either citric acid or vinegar. I would do it as infrequently as you can get away with. Remember limescale can be your friend as well as your enemy. It forms a protective coating on your stainless steel and stripping it off exposes the stainless steel to attack.
 
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Oct 5, 2022
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I agree with what you state but limescale on your heater elements makes them inefficient ,
 
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Apr 19, 2019
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I agree with what you state but limescale on your heater elements makes them inefficient ,
Interesting. I can't think of a scientific reason why it should. Where would the heat go? It would slow down the transfer of heat into the water because it would have to heat up the limescale first I guess.

I reckon it would be good to not allow limescale to build up significantly but would that only happen if you were full timing and always in an area where the water had a high alkalinity (temporary hardness)?
 
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