Motorhome Axle Weights - Carrying Motorcycle

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Mickey1, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. Mickey1

    Mickey1 Funster

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    2017-09-13 10.23.29.jpg 2017-09-13 10.20.01.jpg 2017-09-13 10.19.54.jpg Excuse me for hi jacking the thread, but as it's about axle weights, I got round to weighing mine the other day. One of the reasons is I want to carry a scooter on the back and also would like to know what tyre pressures I need.
    Mickey.
     
  2. gus-lopez

    gus-lopez Funster

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    You've loads there. 440 on front & 580kgs on back. but you still need tokeep under the 4400kgs overall.
     
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  3. Jim

    Jim Ringleader

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  4. Vic

    Vic Funster

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    If you have an Alko chassis, with a heavy duty tow bar and chassis mounted rack the heaviest machine you can carry will be around 170 kg (Honda Sh 300 comes to mind). Vic
     
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  5. emmitdb

    emmitdb Funster

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    Your Back Axle Tyre pressures will depend on the weight imposed as a result of you putting the bike on.
    Don't know what tyres you've got on at present but, fill them to the maximum allowed, put the bike on and take the ensemble to the weighbridge. Find the weight of the individual axles and then have a look at this site.
    http://the-trudgians.com/tyre-pressure-calculator/

    It's for caravans but the principle is the same.

    After you've found out what your tyres should be, reduce as appropriate.
     
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  6. Badknee

    Badknee Funster

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    Ive recently gone up to 70psi from 65psi, the rides a bit harsher but the tyres look right but as ours is a tag you might need a different pressure.

    image.jpeg
     
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  7. Blue Knight

    Blue Knight Funster

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    That's a very useful link but if I were to use it to calculate my own available payload then I would be immediately 75kg out since my brand of motorhome does not include a drivers weight in the published MIRO.

    It seems that some manufacturers use their own MIRO definitions and this will inevitably catch a few people out.

    All the best,

    Andrew
     
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  8. Badknee

    Badknee Funster

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    It seems that some errrr, stretch the truth to Andrew. There was a thread on here not so long ago about an owner rejecting a 3500kg moho because by the time he and his wife were on board they had maxed the MRO out. No clothes, food, water, nothing.
     
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  9. Blue Knight

    Blue Knight Funster

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    Was that Mickey by any chance Paul. It was a good thread and well done that man.

    That said, the worst van we ever came across (and possibly the worst van in motorhome payload history) was the Autotrail Apache 634 (and 632) which has a 1kg payload (one!) once a second leisure battery and the upgraded media pack had been added.

    Crickey, they should be struck off for having only 1kg.

    Mickey: How about adding semi-air to the rear of that beast of yours. It may prove useful.

    Cheers,

    Andrew
     
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  10. Mickey1

    Mickey1 Funster

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    @Badknee that was me, took it back and got this one from a different dealer.

    Mickey.
     
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  11. Mickey1

    Mickey1 Funster

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    I'm a newbie Andrew, semi air's gone right over my head.
    Mickey.
     
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  12. funflair

    funflair Funster Life Member

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    It's air bags to help the suspension, called "semi air" because it only assists the original not replaces it which would be "full air".

    You can have a 12volt pump and gauge built in for levelling purpose or you can have manual valves and just pump it up as you would a tyre.

    Martin
     
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  13. Badknee

    Badknee Funster

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    That's what I have on my head, semi-hair :rolleyes::LOL::LOL:
     
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  14. MikeD

    MikeD Funster

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  15. Blue Knight

    Blue Knight Funster

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    Mike, that's a great set-up but can you explain the cabin controls to me please. I'm assuming the button-switch activates the 12v compressor but what are the two gold screw bits. Are they a type of release valve which are placed in-series with the two compressor lines to help adjust the pressure to the two units?

    Did you fit the gear yourself and can I be cheeky and ask what it cost.

    All the best,

    Andrew
     
  16. MikeD

    MikeD Funster

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    Hi Andrew

    The black centre button activates the pump that blows both sides up at the same time. Its wired into the vehicle battery so its best to have the engine running when u do this. The pump is located under the drivers seat on mine.

    If I did not already have a pump/compressor from our first motorhome I probably would not bother with one as you do not change the pressures that often and as the airbags are not huge they don't take much time to fill.

    The two brass bits are the valves to release air from the airbags on the axle. Each side of the vehicle is independent so you could have a different pressure in each. They cover ordinary car tyre valves which just push in to release the air. If you unscrew the brass bits you could adjust the system pressure using a hand pump if you wanted.

    We had other work done at the time so can't remember how much we paid but Dave Newell fitted the system for us.

    I think it is all Markel Leisure stuff.
    http://marcleleisure.co.uk

    Make sure if you have a Fiat Ducato to get the special plate they make to cover the area as it looks a lot neater that the standard oblong plate they supply with the kit.
     
  17. maison

    maison Funster

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    I agree totally.

    We fitted semi-air as our drive is steep and the road has a steep camber. That means we were in danger of grounding the rear overhang when going in and out.

    Two minutes with a bicycle track pump increases the pressure sufficiently to clear the problem and another twenty seconds or so allows us time to deflate again to running pressure.

    A compressor would have been extra cost and complication that we didn't need. The set-up works well for us.(y)
     
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