Motor bike.

Norfolk Nomad

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Feb 23, 2017
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Looking to buy a small motor bike probably around 400cc, to put in my garage. Are there any sliding ramps available to help loading/unloading, the problem I have is the garage has only one door. Any ideas?
 
Jan 8, 2013
5,679
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Dronfield - Derbyshire
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The problem you will have is what everyone else has and that's the issue of weight. First you will need to load up your van with the minimum amount of equipment including the water fuel and the wife and take a trip to the nearest weigh bridge. I pretty sure you will find you will not have any thing like enough spare capacity to add 160Kg of motorcycle to it without taking the total weight over 3500Kg. It's a common problem.:Eeek:
 
Aug 2, 2017
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Unless you already have a 400cc classic bike or intend to do some serious off road riding it’s worth visiting your local bike dealer and taking a test ride on some of the latest bikes with smaller engines and I’m sure you will be impressed and save lots of hardship getting it in and out of your van.
 
Feb 19, 2017
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https://www.motorcyclenews.com/bike-reviews/ktm/390-duke/2017/
I love the way everyone jumps on the bandwagon and warns you about the weight implications presumably assuming you don’t have the intelligence to work this out for yourself, rather than answering your question.
We camped next to a couple who were carrying a KTM 390 Duke in their garage, they were happy having days out exploring the sights in Spain on the bike, and the best bit is that it only weighs 153 kgs.

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Aug 6, 2013
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https://www.motorcyclenews.com/bike-reviews/ktm/390-duke/2017/
I love the way everyone jumps on the bandwagon and warns you about the weight implications presumably assuming you don’t have the intelligence to work this out for yourself, rather than answering your question.
We camped next to a couple who were carrying a KTM 390 Duke in their garage, they were happy having days out exploring the sights in Spain on the bike, and the best bit is that it only weighs 153 kgs.
That bandwagon as you put it is born of experience. Experience of that question being asked on the Forum: in most cases the person asking the question will have considered the extra weight but rarely understands the implications of loading well behind the rear axle, will never have visited a weighbridge, and will be relying on the load margin quoted by the converter. If asking a few questions offends one but saves many others time, effort, money, and potentially a brush with the Law, then it's worth the risk of appearing to patronise.

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D

Deleted member 29692

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https://www.motorcyclenews.com/bike-reviews/ktm/390-duke/2017/
I love the way everyone jumps on the bandwagon and warns you about the weight implications presumably assuming you don’t have the intelligence to work this out for yourself, rather than answering your question.
We camped next to a couple who were carrying a KTM 390 Duke in their garage, they were happy having days out exploring the sights in Spain on the bike, and the best bit is that it only weighs 153 kgs.

A lot of people don't know that they need to verify it for themselves and think they can believe what their manufacturer or dealer tells them about weights and payloads. You only need to search recent threads on here to see that. There's one a week usually.

153kg is great as long as your garage has more capacity than that allowing for the pivot effect on the rear axle.

Unless you know how to do that maths properly and know how to measure the relevant distance accurately or you've been to a weigh bridge with the bike on board you have no idea whether you're overweight on the rear axle or not.
 
OP
Norfolk Nomad

Norfolk Nomad

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When I was on the weighbridge last year fully loaded ready to go. The front axle weight was 1560kg and the rear was 1980kg. Total weight being 3540kg, this was why I up plated to 4000kg. This gives me 270kg spare on the rear axle, I can also move items from the garage towards the front axle as that weight would now be less due to the cantilever effect of the extra weight on the rear axle. According to the Hymer manual 350kg is the maximum weight permissible in the garage.

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OP
Norfolk Nomad

Norfolk Nomad

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Feb 23, 2017
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Unless you already have a 400cc classic bike or intend to do some serious off road riding it’s worth visiting your local bike dealer and taking a test ride on some of the latest bikes with smaller engines and I’m sure you will be impressed and save lots of hardship getting it in and out of your van.
Must admit I haven't rode a bike in 40 years, i'm sure there have been a few improvements in that time.
 
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Deleted member 29692

Deleted User
When I was on the weighbridge last year fully loaded ready to go. The front axle weight was 1560kg and the rear was 1980kg. Total weight being 3540kg, this was why I up plated to 4000kg. This gives me 270kg spare on the rear axle, I can also move items from the garage towards the front axle as that weight would now be less due to the cantilever effect of the extra eight on the rear axle. According to the Hymer manual 350kg is the maximum weight permissible in the garage.

That’s a good start. (y) It’s worth familiarising yourself with how the cantilever effect works if you haven’t already. The longer your van and the more overhang you have behind the rear axle the bigger the effect is. I think there may be a diagram showing how to calculate it and what to measure on here somewhere.
 
Oct 15, 2011
2,886
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Looking to buy a small motor bike probably around 400cc, to put in my garage. Are there any sliding ramps available to help loading/unloading, the problem I have is the garage has only one door. Any ideas?
Just found this,looks really good but probably not cheap.
http://www.rollinbike.com/eng/

And if you are looking for bike in the 400 range have a look at the KTM Duke 390,we bought one in December and so did a few other Funsters.

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hilldweller

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Dec 5, 2008
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Must admit I haven't rode a bike in 40 years, i'm sure there have been a few improvements in that time.

You will not believe it.

Press a button and it starts.
No drip pan underneath.
Brakes that stop you.
Tyres that grip.

Your big problem will be "Why the **&&^ did I not do this sooner ?".
 
OP
Norfolk Nomad

Norfolk Nomad

Free Member
Feb 23, 2017
258
294
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MH
C Class
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Since 2017
You will not believe it.

Press a button and it starts.
No drip pan underneath.
Brakes that stop you.
Tyres that grip.

Your big problem will be "Why the **&&^ did I not do this sooner ?".
My last bike was a Norton 750 with a 4 speed 1up-3down box. On a good day with a backing wind I could get 120 mph out of it.:D From what I have read a 250 will do that now.

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hilldweller

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Dec 5, 2008
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From what I have read a 250 will do that now.

Not a 250 you'd want in a MH. It would be a back breaking sports bike and you've leave teeth marks in the tank to achieve it.

You can see me on my Honda CB500X. It displays a 100, but more important it is very torquey and easy to live with. Well up to 4/500 miles a day comfort. Maybe a bit big for a MH.

Don't rule out 125s as a very easy to live with local runabout.

I have lusted after the 390 mentioned, it looks a real fun hooligan tool though I've never ridden one. You always have to look out for the vibes in a single, what is fun for a mile or two can be irksome if you really want long ride. I had a BMW 650 single, great till it hit 70 and my teeth started rattling.
 

TheBig1

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Nov 27, 2011
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many many years! since I was a kid
I really like that rollin system, just a shame it wont take a mobility scooter or i would have one tomorrow
 

awg

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Aug 9, 2013
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A few years now.
I use one of these and a folding aluminum ramp like the one @Jaws mentioned.

For me the main issue wan't weight it was height. I had to go for something that would fit through the motorhome door. The 300cc Vepsa just fits and my sons GSXR750 was no issue. My BMW S1000r needs the screen and mirrors taken off to fit. I think my Fireblade would go in with just the mirrors folded back but I haven't tried t.

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Jan 8, 2013
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Dronfield - Derbyshire
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All very good models but how fit is the wife? Could she throw her leg over one of these?

https://www.news18.com/news/auto/top-five-motorcycles-under-400cc-launching-in-2017-1329150.html

Don't discount scooters for comfort and only 169Kg

http://www.honda.co.uk/motorcycles/range/scooter/sh300i-2016/specifications.html

We still have a classic, light, powerful and the wife can get on it easily.

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