Lift up bed for new self build.

Discussion in 'Self-Build Motorhomes' started by Gromett, Sep 24, 2018.

  1. tonyidle

    tonyidle Funster

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    Because it's a truck with a box the 2M at the front is totally lost to the occupant - a shame because swivel seats & the windscreen can turn that area into a very pleasant lounge and can allow a reduction in overall length. For me that's one of the most attractive parts of an A class. I think I'd resent losing it especially if full-timing.
     
  2. tonyidle

    tonyidle Funster

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    The bed system used on most A class vans are pretty simplistic. My latest, for example, uses scissor arms at each side operated by 12v linear actuators. Fully down the actuators are stopped by their internal limit switches. Fully up they're each stopped by a microswitch on the top side of the bed. The only "safety" device was a central leather strap with a hole in it for a turnbuckle attached to the bed. That would not support the weight of the bed & lasted only a week before I forgot it when lowering which pulled the turnbuckle through the hole (with no noticeable effect on movement which is why I didn't spot it until it was too late). I've removed the remains on the basis that for the bed to drop from the up position both actuators would have to fail mechanically at the same time (at which point the strap would have failed as well).
     
  3. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    As a fulltimer comfort comes over such niceties as views. There are a number of reasons I choose to have a bulkhead between living and driving.
    1) Condensation. Even with the best exterior screens you will still get some condensation in the cab area. Behind my dashboard has rusted badly due to this.
    2) Insulation. The cab area is nigh on impossible to insulate to a good enough standard.
    3) Security. I like having the hab area seriously secure separately from the cab area. If someone smashes the side window I don't want them being able to access my living area without a fight.
    4) lighting when off griding. If I am parked in a car park overnight, I want to be able to make the cab area appear to be unoccupied so as not to attract unwanted attention. Putting silver screens up and curtains tends to attract that attention. Personal experience on that one.

    But for me the biggest one is heating/insulation. Much easier if it is separate. As I will have windows on the back and sides and the lounge area is at the back I will be pointing that end at the good views anyway :) Bed is at the front and I don't much need views when lobbing out some zzzz's :D
     
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  4. chaser

    chaser Funster

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    i have not contributed to this thread as all this tecnical stuff is way above my head, but now you are on to leaving the bulkhead in i am in my element , i converted an ambulance this year as you may have seen by my posts on here and we chose to leave the bulkhead in against most peoples advice , and dont regret it for one moment for the reasons you state as well in our case it even leaves you with more space as you dont have to leave space for getting through to the front or turning your seats round , we have the cooker and fridge across ours and it then leaves you with full width further back and you dont have to have a 'corridor ' through to the back.
    if i ever do another one the bulkhead will definitly be staying.
     
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  5. tonyidle

    tonyidle Funster

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    Wasn't so much the view (a bonus) as use of the space for seating. However I'd certainly accept better insulation as a good reason for a van conversion if not so much an A class. A class side insulation, door or not, is as good as the rest of the van & double glazed side windows are an option. An insulated roller blind solves the windscreen problem at night. I completely agree about insulation in a coach built. And I accept the security concerns especially for full timing.
     
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  6. Minxy Girl

    Minxy Girl Funster Life Member

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    I think you've got your mm and cm mixed up there Grom! :D Would you like a new tape measure for Christmas???? :D2
     
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  7. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    You are of course correct. I put it down to me posting just before bed after 20 hours of being awake :D
     
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