Back End Scraping

Sep 28, 2017
71
18
Audenshaw Manchester
Funster No
50,743
MH
Compass 180 Rambler
Exp
2017 Just started as Retirement looms in August
I'm trying to get my MH (2mt overhang from rear wheels) into my unit for some work to be done,only problem is its rather a long ramp and the back end scrapes the floor,I have read on here that there are some MHs fitted with wheels at the back,I have also read from some experts that it might effect the Chassis by lifting it up, I'm looking for something I can fit and take off once the work has been done,I was thinking of something like the Rollers they have on the Roll on Roll of Skips but don't know where to get them from ,I'm sure this is not the first time this question has been asked,so any ideas would be hugely appreciated

Thanks
 
Oct 7, 2013
4,666
29,504
South Wales
Funster No
28,463
MH
Swift Escape Compact
Exp
Since 1988
Probably not the solution you are looking for but we had a similar problem entering our drive, due to long overhang and steep road camber. That was with our previous motorhome.

We fitted air assistance to the rear suspension, manually operated. It lifted the rear end sufficiently to get in and out without grounding. Dropping the pressure a few psi also improved the ride, day to day.

Cost £200 and about 45 minutes to an hour to fit.

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funflair

LIFE MEMBER
Dec 11, 2013
15,305
20,303
Guisborough
Funster No
29,351
MH
MORELO palace
Exp
since 2012
I wouldn't be happy putting wheels on and then forcing it up the ramp as you may well put too much force onto the chassis extension that are really only there to support the garage and the back of the van not the whole rear axle weight.

Can you put some planks or something on the ramp for the back wheels to run up onto and lift the back end.

Martin
 

soreeyes

Free Member
Feb 21, 2012
351
136
Dorset
Funster No
19,903
MH
Sunlight T69L 2017
Exp
im a newbie
I would think you would require something like machine skates capable of over 1000 kgs each .

As said air suspension might be your answer

I have the same issue with a 2 m + overhang and a towbar .
 
Dec 12, 2010
4,031
12,947
Cumbria
Funster No
14,651
MH
C Class
Exp
since 2011
If you feel confident enough and the chassis/axle design allows it, as a one off, jack the van up by the chassis till the wheel is almost starting to lift, then place some suitable blocks of wood between the axle and the the chassis and then lower the van back down, wedging the blocks between the chassis and axle, it will settle a bit but should be sitting higher, enough to travel a few feet onto the ramp.
 
OP
A
Sep 28, 2017
71
18
Audenshaw Manchester
Funster No
50,743
MH
Compass 180 Rambler
Exp
2017 Just started as Retirement looms in August
Its a very steep ramp.looking at the replies and not wanting to fit Air Suspension I think scaffold planks is going to be the answer


Thanks for your Answers

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The Nomad

Free Member
Aug 24, 2016
1,053
1,059
Wandering in Europe
Funster No
44,781
MH
Overcab
Exp
Many years
Make up buy from any DIY shop a dolly.... 4 castor wheels attached to a small square of solid wood.
Have a glamorous assistant put it under the rear chassis at the point where it's about to ground out.
 
Feb 22, 2008
11,208
34,067
Norfolk
Funster No
1,575
MH
Hymer B544
Exp
Since 2004
I would get a couple of long wide 2" thick timbers , not over expensive, which would probably give the clearance needed and keep them for future use.

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funflair

LIFE MEMBER
Dec 11, 2013
15,305
20,303
Guisborough
Funster No
29,351
MH
MORELO palace
Exp
since 2012
Make up buy from any DIY shop a dolly.... 4 castor wheels attached to a small square of solid wood.
Have a glamorous assistant put it under the rear chassis at the point where it's about to ground out.
Would you jack your van up by the rear chassis extensions?

Martin
 

two

Aug 4, 2011
4,408
3,446
West Midlands
Funster No
17,624
MH
A-Class Fiat
I don't understand the bogey wheels at the back. They reduce clearance and lift the chassis at the weakest point, inducing twist if you're not lucky. Under dire circumstances, you could end up with no traction if RWD.

You need to clear the rear end by lifting the rear wheels. Do not attempt to make a 'bridge'. Just pack enough hard material under the wheels to lift them and the back end up until it's clear.
 
Jan 28, 2008
8,381
12,729
walthamstow east london
Funster No
1,353
MH
renault burstner delphin
Exp
7 years campers before that

scotjimland

Free Member
Jul 25, 2007
0
-12
.
Funster No
15
MH
.
Exp
.
thats ok if your chassis will take it but most vans with a 2m overhang will have some very thin extensions at the back grounding it on to wheels could bend them very easily

I was only pointing out what is fitted to USRVs, not advising that it should be fitted ,

that is a decision for the OP .. he asked >>

I was thinking of something like the Rollers they have on the Roll on Roll of Skips but don't know where to get them from ,

I answered that question .. didn't give any advice..
 
OP
A
Sep 28, 2017
71
18
Audenshaw Manchester
Funster No
50,743
MH
Compass 180 Rambler
Exp
2017 Just started as Retirement looms in August
Scotjimlad

I like the look of them can be put on and take them off,I fully understand the pros and cons of damage that may occur

Thanks For That

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Sep 22, 2009
373
163
nottingham
Funster No
8,576
MH
A Class
Exp
5 years
Seen quite a few vans around this year with wheels permanently fitted at rear. I think that they were mainly Concords
 

maxi77

Free Member
Mar 20, 2013
892
560
Kingdom of Fife
Funster No
25,172
MH
coacbuilt
Exp
newbie
We had this problem when being recovered after a failed clutch. The recovery driver had a lot of wood blocks to raise the rear wheels as we went onto the ramp.
 
Feb 22, 2008
11,208
34,067
Norfolk
Funster No
1,575
MH
Hymer B544
Exp
Since 2004
We had this problem when being recovered after a failed clutch. The recovery driver had a lot of wood blocks to raise the rear wheels as we went onto the ramp.

Simplest and cheapest method, as post #12 .

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two

Aug 4, 2011
4,408
3,446
West Midlands
Funster No
17,624
MH
A-Class Fiat
Simplest and cheapest method, as post #12 .
Cheaper to use short lengths, moving the last used one infront of the currently used one. Make sure there is plenty of clearance at the back before you come off or use thinner sections at the end. Short lengths also allow for a curve.
 
Feb 22, 2008
11,208
34,067
Norfolk
Funster No
1,575
MH
Hymer B544
Exp
Since 2004
Cheaper to use short lengths, moving the last used one infront of the currently used one. Make sure there is plenty of clearance at the back before you come off or use thinner sections at the end. Short lengths also allow for a curve.

That'll do it , simple cheap and effective.

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Oct 29, 2009
2,958
5,379
Derby
Funster No
9,111
MH
Dethleffs
Exp
Since 2006

scotjimland

Free Member
Jul 25, 2007
0
-12
.
Funster No
15
MH
.
Exp
.
Yep, that would definitely prevent damage to the tow hitch. Not sure what effect (damage?) the resultant forces being transmitted elsewhere on the vehicle would have though.

Not something I’d contemplate.

Ian

Ian , I think I already answered this point, perhaps you missed my post ..

I was only pointing out what I fitted to my USRV and where to buy them

not advising that it should be fitted..

that is a decision for the OP

.. he asked >>

I was thinking of something like the Rollers they have on the Roll on Roll of Skips but don't know where to get them from

I answered that question on where to source them.. .. didn't give any advice..
 

PeteH

Free Member
Nov 22, 2007
6,862
9,027
East Riding of Yorkshire
Funster No
900
MH
Rapido, 999M.
Exp
18+yrs plus 25+Towing
Couple of points. Majority of US R-v`s in my experience do not use chassis extensions, And the Rails are the same size thickness and quality as the whole chassis. So the fitting of Rollers is not the same issue as the "Alko" style Rear end. Same applies with the roller attached to the often integrated tow bar, all of which in true American Style are likely to be severely "over engineered!" Assuming you have the length behind, effectively lengthening the approach is the safe bet. Living in the East Riding, virtual "home" of the UK caravan industry. We used 5 to 10 M lengths of aluminium channel, supported periodically, to load 40ft Static caravans onto the Lorries. If you see such rigs on the road you will see the Channel and supports lashed under the `vans.

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