Woodwork - needs some love

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Mattyjwr, Mar 15, 2014.

  1. Mattyjwr

    Mattyjwr Funster Life Member

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    Our La Strada woodwork is looking a little tired - is it likely to have been waxed, oiled or varnished in the past? What could I use to bring back the sparkle?
     
  2. acting_strange

    acting_strange

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    Some pictures of yours would be a good start...so we have an idea?

    Depending on what you already have on the woodwork will dictate what is required.
     
  3. Mattyjwr

    Mattyjwr Funster Life Member

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    The examples. Some marks look like shower or rain spray. Some just worn through use.

    Cheers
     

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  4. paulmold

    paulmold Read Only Funster

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    Try Wood Silk

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HWBalHz5sE"]Aristowax Original Wood Silk Aerosol Fine Furniture Polish w Beeswax - YouTube[/ame]

    Tesco do their own version
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2014
  5. icantremember

    icantremember Funster

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    You could use scandinavian oil which will put some life back into the wood but leave a hard, dry, semi-gloss finish.
     
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  6. TheBig1

    TheBig1 Funster Life Member

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    oiling and waxing work well on bare wood or wood previously coated in wax etc. the problem is motorhomes are built using lightweight woods that have been stained and lacquered to appear to be more expensive hardwoods. the lacquer is basically a waterproof barrier preventing oils and waxes from getting at the wood. therefore you need to sand the lacquer first

    in the pictures above it appears that moisture has discoloured the lacquer with age leading to spotting. in this case, a light sand and a coat of coloured polyurethane varnish or lacquer over the top will cover it up and give an even finish
     
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  7. Terry

    Terry Funster

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    Perhaps wire wool rather than sandpaper :Wink:
    terry
     
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