Winterizing. What exactly is it?

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Nik, Nov 26, 2015.

  1. Nik

    Nik Funster

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2014
    Messages:
    118
    Likes Received:
    80
    Location:
    Surrey UK
    Hi.
    Our 1st winter of MoHo ownership approaches.
    I have often read/heard about vehicles being winterised. What exactly needs to be done, can you do it yourself or does it have to go to a servicing dealer.
    For the most part the vehicle will be in storage but we intend to use it in Feb in the UK.
    Thanks in advance.
    Regards et al.
    Nik.
     
  2. Figaro

    Figaro Funster

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Messages:
    842
    Likes Received:
    678
    Location:
    Newcastle under Lyme Staffordshire
    Done at the factory for the most part at design stage (Germany makes) British makes not so good in this area I think, more of an after thought.
    What van do you have ?
     
  3. Nik

    Nik Funster

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2014
    Messages:
    118
    Likes Received:
    80
    Location:
    Surrey UK
    Sorry, should have included that.
    A 2012 Autotrail Delaware.
    regards
    Nik
     
  4. Jim

    Jim Ringleader

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Messages:
    25,857
    Likes Received:
    76,238
    Location:
    Sutton on Sea
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Armytwowheels

    Armytwowheels Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2012
    Messages:
    4,025
    Likes Received:
    6,396
    Location:
    Market Harborough
    According to my dog, it's getting the sheepskin rugs out of the cupboard.

    image.jpeg
    image.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 4
  6. Badknee

    Badknee Funster

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Messages:
    3,642
    Likes Received:
    15,268
    Location:
    notloB
    The main thing is get fluids out that will freeze, fresh, grey, black, bottled water etc. As Jim pointed out the guide is brilliant.
     
  7. GeebeeJaybee

    GeebeeJaybee

    Joined:
    May 28, 2015
    Messages:
    293
    Likes Received:
    346
    Location:
    St Helens
    I don't think the OP meant what should he do while in storage. I think he means what do winterised motorhomes have to make them more usuable in winter and can he do this himself.

    To answer that.... Ours has double floors etc, heated waste water, additional wall insulation, combined heating system etc. Not sure how much of that you could retrofit.

    We did use ours last weekend in sub zero temperatures in the lake district with no issues at all. Well, there was one issue - it was horribly windy and I though we would topple over!
     
  8. haganap

    haganap Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    Messages:
    11,069
    Likes Received:
    13,678
    Location:
    Heavan
    I had a Brit van which I winterised myself and had it down to -20 in the alps for skiing.
    In terms of what winterisation means there is what manufactures will tell you and then the reality.
    An example is they will tell you it's grade 3 etc etc, this refers to the construction of the panels only and therefore should be taken with a pinch of salt.
    If you have a "coach built" which you do, there is no amount of winterisation that you can carry out in terms of draughts from the cab areas even on a nice posh cathargo. But the good thing is it won't matter if you put the heating on and drive somewhere you will be warm. You may then when pitched lose heat through the cab area and the result is simply more gas will be used to keep you toasty but with a good set of external blinds or in my case I purchased some blinds that covered the whole of the front cab to prevent heat escape.

    Then there are other areas that will let you get a draught in, again even on a posh A class and thats the way sky lights fit on the roof, nothing that a bit of pipe insulation wont help with mind but again it's only going to stop heat escaping.

    The biggest issues you come up against is frozen pipework. Unless your pipe work is contained in a nice warm locker or heated double floor it may freeze but depending on temps of course. The best you can do with this is just insulate it as best you can but to be honest if your going in this country for a few nights away don't worry too much.

    Vans are without a doubt getting better and this includes Brit vans as more people look for all year usage and not just country summers of yesteryear. However the main issues seem to be with the NCBA regulations in ensuring drops for gas which leaves Brit vans with more ventilation than a err, ventialtion shaft. For me you can't beat a night away in a van with a sharp frost outside and your heating on snuggled under the covers with your loved one.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  9. Oriel

    Oriel

    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Messages:
    459
    Likes Received:
    680
    Location:
    West Sussex
    I'm not sure that you can do anything to winterise your vehicle. I think its all to do with the construction of the vehicle itself. The whole of our vehicle is constructed with 2-sided aluminium panels with styrofoam insulation and all the tanks etc housed so they won't freeze. The garage and lockers are heated.

    I suppose you could contact a dealership to see what if anything can be done as a retrofit.
     
  10. Nik

    Nik Funster

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2014
    Messages:
    118
    Likes Received:
    80
    Location:
    Surrey UK
    Thanks All
    Yes, for its time in store I have emptied all tanks and pipes.
    I was slightly more concered about when we are away in Feb the pipes freezing overnight and bursting. They don't seem that substantial and some are exposed under the vehicle. Would you recommend a spray foam from of insulation?
    Draughts we can live with but it was more the water stuff that was concerning.
    Thanks again for the good advice based on your experiences.
    Cheers.
    Nik
     
  11. sdc77

    sdc77 Funster

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2013
    Messages:
    2,487
    Likes Received:
    2,895
    Location:
    East london
    I think exposed water pipes are going to be a bit risky. Even with foam insulation they are still exposed. They may cope in the UK but I'm not sure about somewhere really cold.
    I don't think draughts are your main problem tbh. It's your plumbing.
    Our van has its water pipes routed along with heating pipes. Fresh water is on board and not exposed and waste water.. whilst insulated is left open with a bucket or waste hog below when very cold.
     
Loading...

Share This Page