Winterising engine bay

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by icantremember, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. icantremember

    icantremember Funster

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    Having just received Jim's new weekly newsletter I thought I would take his advice and read the tips for winterising a m/h among which is the following;-

    "Waterproof the Electrics in Engine bay
    Storing inside or out, it’s worth giving all your exposed electrical connection a light spray of WD40, this should keep the winter moisture out and prevent any rust forming that might then give you problems in the spring."

    My query now, having followed recent threads where some of our very knowledgeable members mentioned WD40 as causing corrosion, is the advice still to spray electrics with WD or is there a more suitable product?
     
  2. aba

    aba

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    might be better with a silicone spray but someone will advise which is best
     
  3. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    Under no circumstances use WD 40 as it becomes hygroscopic ( attracts and absorbs water ) after a while

    Use a silicone spray or the correct stuff ( as used for planes ), ACF-50 ( of which a very little goes a hellova way and is good for a couple of years at least.

    It is very popular with bikers as it stops corrosion in its tracks and repels water all the time, not just for the first couple of weeks it is sprayed on ! )

    I am a stockist of the stuff and if anyone wants a tin would be happy to offer members of Fun a 12.5% discount.
     
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  4. Jim

    Jim Ringleader

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    Ive been using WD40 every winter on motorhome and Landrovers for many years, I don't use much, just a very light spray. If you use too much it can become greasy, especially if you continue adding it and get a build up. Its great for getting rid of any damp that is present and then protecting it for the winter. I have used silicone, it works just as well, but that will trap any moisture that is present. Use too much Silicone and its even greasier than WD40.

    If there are better products to use when laying a van up then let me know and I'll update the article:thumb:
     
  5. Jim

    Jim Ringleader

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    Just Noticed on the cover of this months Practical Motorhome that there is a laying up for winter article by a guy called Ed Evans. Among the two pages of advice.

    " A squirt of WD40 on electrical connectors will help dispel corrosion and moisture. Don't forget the towbar socket too"

    If this is wrong, I'd be happy to blog about what we should be using.:thumb:

    NB. He also mentions oiling steel headlamp adjuster screws, good advice I've had those rusted up solid before

     
  6. rainbow chasers

    rainbow chasers Read Only Funster

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    No -one should shoot anyone for suggesting WD40.

    It has been used for years for this purpose as it was the best and most available product at the time.

    Things change, and time moves on. Other more suitable products are on the market now, and are far less expensive than they had previously been, making them a better alternative. Previously, they would have only been available to select groups or at a premium price, so were not considered.

    PTFE Spray can now be bought for under £2, as can SILICONE spray/grease. This is good for your electrics (particularly silicone) and doesn't have the rotting characteristics of oil based products.
     
  7. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    Not been mentioned yet .. Waxoyl

    Traditionally a rust preventive treatment for bodywork.. but it will also protect and seal electrical boxes, connectors, joint boxes etc .

    I recall when I had my first car, a 1964 Mini. It would stop at the smallest puddle it crossed.. My dad suggested spraying the distributor, coil and leads with Waxoyl .. not very pretty, but it sealed and prevented water ingress, no more stopping when it rained.. I also sprayed any exposed bolts, back of headlights etc ..

    It now comes in a clear version, in a handy sized aerosol can ..
     
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  8. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    WD 40 problems are very fairly well documented Jim

    WD 40 has got many good uses, and indeed it DOES chase water off but only when fresh..
    If you want to use it then I would recommend it is wiped off and refreshed at the very least once a month

    Best uses that spring to mind are cleaning ( virtually anything ! ) and if you cut your self while covered in oil use it straight on the cut to clean it out

    WD 40 has absolutely nothing in it that can harm you.. They ( whoever they are ) even say it you can drink it without issue ( a bit pointless but hey ho ! )
     
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  9. pablomc

    pablomc Funster Life Member

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    Funny you should mention that and I know slightly off topic, but I just recently had the underside of my van done with Waxoyl by thewaxworks. They did a cracking job. :thumb:
     
  10. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    forget what 'they' say John . read the safety data sheet ..

    http://www.wd40.co.uk/Files/EUF0002_0017_19-01-2011_EN.pdf
     
  11. Jim

    Jim Ringleader

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    Interesting stuff, I'll do a bit of research and amend or add to that article :thumb:
     
  12. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    Jim, sorry mate, I have to deal with bikes that folk have used it on, on almost a daily basis..

    Never mind what 'they say' or indeed what the WD 40 sellers say ( who just MIGHT have a reason for telling everyone how great it is ? ) I know what I see and have to sort out.. and WD 40 is quite often the gooey mess round rusty bolts !!

    So no hearsay, no 'my mate told me', nor even believing anything written anywhere, just reporting on my own personal findings on the stuff

    Many moons ago ( and I do mean many ! ) I absolutely LOVED WD 40.. It probably earned me several hundred quid a year going out to Minis, Escorts, Cortinas and the like which would not start on damp mornings.. Standard job .. replace the distributor cap and leads that the owner had sprayed WD on

    As I say, WD 40 has very many good uses, especially on apps indoors and for cleaning.. But it has its practical long term experience has taught me ( and many others ) it has limitations no matter what the manufacturer says
     
  13. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    I wasn't questioning your experience John .. not a great lover of it either .. I was referring specifically to what 'they' said about drinking it .. it's not a 'safe' product .


    While we are on the subject , what are your views on Duck Oil ?

    that was another of my dad's favourites.. one I've also used extensively
     
  14. jonandshell

    jonandshell Funster

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    Sillicone grease spray!

    NO, NO, NO!!!

    DO NOT! Spray low voltage, ie. 12V connectors with silicone grease!

    Silicone grease is used for waterproofing HT (spark plug) leads on petrol engines for a good reason- it is an extremely good insulator!
    Apply it to low voltage connections at your peril, an open circuit is sure to happen when the stuff finds its way into the joint by capillary action!

    WD, Waxoil or just plain grease is the way forward!:thumb::thumb:
     
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  15. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    Oddly, absolutely sod all worthwhile experience of Duck oil.. But never heard anything bad said about it ( which in my field is a big thumbs up :Wink: )

    Interesting view on silicone grease.. It was a standard part of a television engineers tool kit to grease the contacts on the biscuits in the rotary tuners.

    I use something called Corrosion Block grease myself.. another spin off from the aeronautical market, and like ACF, made by Lear ( of Lear Jet fame ) for use on their craft
     
  16. jonandshell

    jonandshell Funster

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    Was it actually silicone grease or a silicone-looking grease John?

    We used silicone grease for waterproofing HT systems when preparing vehicles for deep wading whilst in the Army.
    It worked well on my V8 Landy when greenlaning the soggier parts of Hampshire and Surrey too!

    I call on experience when I advise not to use the stuff on low voltage connectors.
    I thought it would be fantastic idea to use it instead of petroleum jelly on the battery terminals of a Peugeot 405 once.
    On my way back to Germany after a period of leave, I noticed my lights pulsating on tickover.
    When I got on the ferry, the engine failed to restart! In fact, not even a single dash light came on! I was very confused, the battery was showing fully charged on my multimeter! Removing the battery leads and cleaning the offending grease from the terminals and posts got the engine to restart!:thumb:

    The bloody stuff had penetrated the joint on the battery, think how it would affect a temperature sensor or oil light switch?:Eeek:
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2012
  17. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    Use to be supplied by RS, but of course, thinking about it, the biscuits were being forced on to their contacts every time the channel was changed..so a nice new contact joint every time .... it was also in a bone dry environment so no chance of water ingress
    Its job was primarily lubrication rather than moisture prevention

    We also smeared it on the back of the CRT's at the EHT point in the aquadag to stop potential arc over..

    So analysing what we used it for I reckon I would be 100% with you Jon :thumb:
     
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  18. jonandshell

    jonandshell Funster

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    The idea of using the silcone grease would have been to stop tracking between the segments I reckon, John.:thumb:
     
  19. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    Nah mate.. the tuners would just seize up without it... In fact only last year I found a couple from a tuner that was out of a Thorn 8xx or 9xx series chassis.. Still usable 40 years on ( though usable for WHAT today I have absolutely no idea !! )
     
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  20. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    there are three R numbers listed in the spec sheet..

    R65
    R66
    R67

    I wouldnt drink it :Eeek:


    R65 Harmful: may cause lung damage if swallowed
    R66 Repeated exposure may cause skin dryness or cracking
    R67 Vapours may cause drowsiness and dizziness
     
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