winter heat

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by mariner41, Nov 5, 2009.

  1. mariner41

    mariner41 Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    scotland
    Hi all .
    just want to pick your brains if you don't mind thanks.:thumb:
    Our motorhome is parked in the driveway as we wont be able to
    use it untill the spring.
    It is our first winter so I have drained it and prepared it by the book.
    I was worried about cold and damp so I connected the hookup cable
    into the garage so I could use the internal heating system at intervals
    if required.
    But being a novice I dont know if it is a good/bad idea or if there is a
    better alternative.
    our first summer was brilliant, cant wait for next year.:Smile:
    thanks for your time.
    Jim.
     
  2. madbluemad

    madbluemad

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    243
    Location:
    spain
    I have my rv hooked up all year round and its not a problem.

    A lot of people have heaters in their mh- rv, small fan heaters or oil filled radiators so that they can be turned on and off whenever it gets really cold. It tends to keep the damp away.

    Jim
    :Smile:
     
  3. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    27,229
    Likes Received:
    34,414
    Location:
    Acklam, Teesside, originally Glossop
    Our van is parked on the drive as well - though we do try to get away in winter as well as other times of year when we can.

    The built-in heating is gas only so we have a small oil-filled radiator which can be turned on during colder nights. We used it quite a lot in our first winter but then realised that we didn't need to use it quite as much. We now keep an eye on the weather forecasts for cold nights and switch on just when needed.

    Graham
     
  4. Spacerunner

    Spacerunner Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    195
    Location:
    Hampshire
    A small heater with a 'frost guard' setting is ideal as it comes on automatically when the temperature drops to a critical level.

    I also use a dehumidifier. Ok, I know that the 'van will not be hermetically sealed but it will keep the soft furnishings and upholstery from absorbing too much moisture.

    As a side effect the dehumidifier will whoosh air around the interior at a very slightly higher than ambient temperature. This will prevent pockets of stagnant air which would otherwise encourage dampness and mildew.

    A decent dehumidifier can be purchased for about £100-£130.
     
  5. tony morris

    tony morris Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2008
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Calcot Reading Berkshire
    Hi Jim we use a small ceramic heater very low running costs, what we do is plug it into a timer switch, you can ajust when you wan't it to come on, and go off they have 2 heat settings with a fan we find this keeps the chill off without any proplems. you don,t have to worry about taking the seating, cushions, or any of the bedding out of your van you can buy them from argos,homebase,comet,focus,currys etc, cost under £20 good luck Tony
     
  6. Larrynwin

    Larrynwin Funster

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    8,492
    Likes Received:
    12,686
    Location:
    Norfolk
    We are hooked up in drive and use an oil filled rad through winter months. Keeps it dry and aired ready for a quickie, trip that is :BigGrin:
     
  7. savantuk

    savantuk Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2009
    Messages:
    751
    Likes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Cumbria, Lake district UK
    Hi,

    In the winter in UK, and in Europe, if a hook up is available, I use a small and very quiet fan heater on .5kw setting. It heats up our 6.5m motor home very quickly indeed, using none of the van's resources. Mine came from Comet a few years ago, costing around £5.

    This for me is a no brainer.
     
  8. johngee

    johngee Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    Mine is parked on our drive and I plan to keep using it through the winter for daytime trips at weekends, or at least take it for a bit of a run once a week.
    When it gets cold I was thinking of hooking up to the mains and turning the Truma on to a low setting as necessary.

    Does anyone see any issues with that?
     
  9. mariner41

    mariner41 Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    scotland
    Thanks folks for all the Ideas.
    Tony's timer switch sounds sounds good.
    never thought of that.
    thanks once again
    All the best
    Jim.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Messages:
    29,452
    Likes Received:
    16,883
    Location:
    YO11 2BD
    hope you realise if its on 24/7 its costing you £50 per month.
     
  11. Boadicea

    Boadicea Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Stockport
    We had an old Autotrail last year and we did'nt put any heat on through the winter. Just used the crystal bags to soak up any condensation and stood the cushions up. It was fine.
     
  12. geoff1947

    geoff1947 Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    999
    Likes Received:
    89
    Location:
    Plymouth
    Wintering

    As it will be on your drive you can monitor the weather and heat the van accordingly. NOT a good idea to leave for too long so go for a drive at weekends if you can. It will do it (and you) the world of good. I note that there is an article in the December issue of Practical Motorhome (Broused at Tesco today) re lying up for the winter Worth a read:Smile:
     
Loading...

Share This Page