Winter advice

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by MrJinks, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. MrJinks

    MrJinks Read Only Funster

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    Hi All,

    Picked up the Mobilvetta today in Essex and journey back to Dorset was fine (M25 excepted). All seems great and everything that Pullingers promised was done.

    Earlier thread mentioned the precautions to take with winter weather on its way, although it may not be freezing down here in Dorset (so close to the equator). :BigGrin: However, if I keep a heater on 24/7 inside the MH as it is connected to hook-up, do I need to drain anything down as I hope to be using it as often as possible during the winter.



    Any advice please :thanks:


    Garry
     
  2. vindiboy

    vindiboy Funster

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    Well my Hymer is a fully winterised vehicle, this means that all tanks and pipework is INSIDE the vehicle, including the waste tank drain valve, so less chance of a freeze up, I do not drain my tanks or pipework, but I have an oil filled radiator in the van and have it on when the temperature drops, [ like this evening ] I open all the locker doors inside, so the warmed air can circulate and prevent any cold spots,I have not had any problems to date and as my van is in my garden I can keep an eye on it all the time.My oil filled radiator is running on 400 watt setting and the temp in the van NOW is 14 degrees ,The beds in the van are made up and all our clothing is in the van, we like to keep our van at the ready to go stage and keeping it warm like this works for us.:thumb::thumb::thumb::thumb::thumb:
     
  3. RichyB

    RichyB Read Only Funster

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    I'd be really careful if the pipework isn't inside. An aquarium heater would solve the freshwater tank problem, and some people put antifreeze in the wastewater tank and toilet cartridges. But I would advise you research it well, there are many good links on the web dealing with the issue. The one thing that is difficult to prevent problems with is outside pipes and valves. Short of boxing/cladding them in there isn't much else you can do. Take care and best of luck!:thumb:
     
  4. DESCO

    DESCO Read Only Funster

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    I always drain our water off to prevent possible trouble, after all how long does take to put water in, and charge the toilet prior to leaving.

    I always remember a friend who didn't and we were going to meet him, when he came to leave discovered he had had a pipe freeze and burst in a cold snap, so in my book better to be safe than sorry.



    Dave:thumb::thumb:
     
  5. RichyB

    RichyB Read Only Funster

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    I agree with Dave, I do the same. Better safe than sorry!:shout:
     
  6. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    Clink Eastwood put it like this "Are you feelin lucky punk ?"

    Why take the chance ?

    I had to dismantle my shower to repair frost damage to the shower valve and I *had* drained down -- but not fully.

    It's little corners, like this shower valve insulated from the little heater inside but exposed to the cold outside. And this is officially winterised, it's even got a ski locker.
     
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