Wind & Awnings

Discussion in 'American RV's' started by Boo, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. Boo

    Boo Read Only Funster

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    I have a big ol' A&E awning on Winnie, my question is:

    1. What kind of wind can these things take?..........any horror stories?
    2. Are they o.k with snow?
    3. Which is better and why........Awning legs on the ground or fixed to the side?
    4. Do I need to service it?

    I have had it extended in 40mph winds with the ani-flap clamps and the storm strap fitted without a problem so far............. but I don't want to damage it as they are over £1500 to replace.

    Any advice would be great :thumb:

    Boo
     
  2. Munchie

    Munchie Funster Life Member

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    On our Euro van we have a 4.5 metre awning and were warned to take it down in high winds. We have the legs to ground held down with two pegs each. We also have a tie down on each leg and we throw one over the middle of the awning to stop it flapping (were advised against this as may stretch the awning edges) If it does we take the view "so what" I'd rather stretch the edges than have it rip the side out of the van. We then take a judgment when to take it down as the wind gets up. :Smile:
     
  3. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    Hi Boo,The American ones will take a lot more hammer than the European ones. I use a tyedown kit on mine and leave it out all winter in Spain when the Europeans are running in and out winding Fiamas etc in.I personaly find it stronger with the legs fixed to the side of the van.Obviosly if its goig to be gail force then wind it in to be on the safe side.Regarding snow,have never been anywhere with snow for years.:Rofl1:.Make sure that one end is lower than the other so that rain runs off,water is heavy.
     
  4. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    Hi

    Gusts of wind are the worst, I never leave ours deployed overnight or if leaving the site, I've seen several over the roof resulting in ripped fabric and damage to legs and coach work .. it's not worth the risk.. as soon as it starts to flap badly .. I get it stowed.

    I use the wall brackets, if using the feet on the ground you need to peg down and use a tie down strap..

    Never tried with snow but I imagine the weight could rip the fabric.. I await your report with baited breath :Laughing:

    The only maintenance needed is to wash the fabric, I first wash off with a hose, brush in a mild soap solution, roll it up and leave for 30 mins.. unfurl and hose off.

    For really stubborn dirt Therford Awning cleaner is very good.

    I recommend a travel strap, I lost an awning on the M6 when it deployed after being struck by a strong side gust .. I was lucky and only needed a new fabric.. about £260 DIY fitting , this is a well reported problem on the yank forums.

    Strap supplied by Linda at Stateside Tuning , easy to fit and worth the £50

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Boo

    Boo Read Only Funster

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    You ain't seen snow for years??.....................and your called SNOWbird? lolol! :Rofl1:

    Mine doesn't wind out, it's a lever for in and out and you just hook the strap and pull or push :thumb:


    Boo
     
  6. Geo

    Geo Trader - Funster

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    40mph winds you must be mad:Eeek:
    I was there along with a few other very big blokes trying to stop Olleys awning being ripped off and thrown over his RV roof, despite all efforts it tossed us about like rag dolls and causd damage to a few roof fittings as well as destroying the legs, and yes they were well pegged down and strapped, as for snow it will stretch the fabric out of shape and any awning fabric out of shape is not going to roll back up properly and then you will have the danger of it catching wind when driving and then un unfurling on the Motorway not a pleasant experiance
    Ken stop straping the fabric!!!!!
    Geo
     
  7. Boo

    Boo Read Only Funster

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    Does that mean you need a ladder or have to get on top to fasten the strap Jim?

    Do I need to oil or greese it anywhere?

    Boo
     
  8. Munchie

    Munchie Funster Life Member

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    I here what you say Geo but why? We have a centre bar and the fabric is held down onto this with the extra tie down. Apart from the fact it may stretch the edge a bit (does this really matter much). :Doh:
     
  9. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    No ladder required, the clamp is operated using the awning 'wand'

    I occasionally oil the hinge pins.. other than that no.

    jim
     
  10. DESCO

    DESCO Read Only Funster

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    When I used awning on Euro van once went out for the day on a site in the Midlands we had a lovely day on returning to the site it looked as if it had been struck by a tornado. At least 20 vans had been struck by a sudden series of short but very violent gusts of wind.
    Awnings were all flipped over the vans, both caravans and motorhomes, We had only been a few miles away and had seen no sign of winds. The Wardens had been at the site for years and said they had never seen anything like it.
    We were always very careful after and in fact stopped using awnings soon after, I lived by the maxim better a live coward than a dead hero.


    Dave:thumb::thumb:
     
  11. madbluemad

    madbluemad

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    Ive got an A&E roll out awning and all that I can say is the fella who designed it must o been on drugs.

    If ever I use it which is not often I have the legs clamped in to the side.

    It doesnt take much wind for the clamps on the roof of the van to start rattling so its got to be very, very sunny and flat calm before I even think about it.

    Make sure that you keep all of the sliding bits well lubricated, they will bind if you dont

    Jim
    :Smile:
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2009
  12. savantuk

    savantuk Read Only Funster

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    I may be lucky, but I have never suffered awning damage in 10 years or so I've been using them. I have a DWL (German) sailcloth wind out awning on my Hobby. It comes equipped with twin spring tiedowns which attach at the top of the legs, and each one is adjustable. I also use two extra guyropes which attach to the tiedown shackles at each mount. I set out each 'guy' at 45 degrees to the corners, and ensure that each is as tight as possible. When the guys are set, it is impossible to move the front bar. I also leave a couple of turns of awning fabric around the roller, so that the fabric won't tear at the join.

    Here is a pic of the set up at last weeks Shrewsbury Folk festival. It was very windy, as you can see from my spinners, and the awning didn't move an inch!!

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Munchie

    Munchie Funster Life Member

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    Hi Geo, just wondered if there is some other reason I should not strap the fabric? What you said was backed up by the manufacturer but they just mentioned the danger of stretching the edges which I don't mind so much. We found that the strap across the middle stopped nearly all of the "flapping" although we still take it down in "high winds". :BigGrin:
     
  14. Geo

    Geo Trader - Funster

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    Hi Ken
    Stretching of the fabric in my opinion is asking for trouble in the not too distant future:Doh:
    The system relies on the sheet remaining the size and most importantly the shape it is,
    exaggerating slightly to make the point, stretch the sides and your roller will need say 20 revolutions to take up the middle and 21 to take up the sides, it cant do both:Eeek:
    so a baggy difficult to close up awning will be the result,

    I have seen many with that very problem,not caused by using your particular method, most likely due to not slanting the awning when rain is expected, allowing water to pool and stretch fabric, poorly tensioned awnings allow the wind to bellow the sheet to much, also with the same result
    Best solution is to have a taught straight fabric slanted as described in wet weather and tied only using the metal parts, awning anti flappers are available to help with what you do with your extra tie down. check out some RVs we use anti flappers on a regular basis
    Geo
    PS Try rolling up a swimming cap, around a rolling pin
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2009
  15. Munchie

    Munchie Funster Life Member

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    Thanks Geo, that makes sense now and I shall desist. Must find out about those anti flappers (sounds disgusting) I can never understand why the makers can't incorporate a means to tie the fabric to the wind out legs. :Eeek:
     
  16. Jackomet

    Jackomet Read Only Funster

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    Replacement fabric

    SJim,
    Where did you get it from and how easy to fit? Mine slightly torn as a result of a tight turn in a village in France.
    JK
     
  17. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    Hi

    Linda from Stateside Tuning supplied ..

    It's fairly easy to replace, comes with full instructions.. :Laughing:

    a couple of helpers are useful when feeding the new fabric onto the roller and roof rail..

    she also sells awning fabric repair tape.. might save you a few bob

    Jim
     

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