Understanding weight numbers

Discussion in 'The Beginner' started by beachcaster, May 29, 2011.

  1. beachcaster

    beachcaster Read Only Funster

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    I have recently bought 2009 Autotrail 696 Cheyenne SE G
    with a 3litre auto box

    I would like to understand the weight issues before I take it down to my local weighbridge

    I have two stickers under the bonnet.

    One headed Autotrail..which is a white plastic material
    and the other a silver metal sticker headed FIAT

    the Autotrail one says:
    ----------------------------------------

    Second Stage Conversion

    MAW 4000 kg
    GTW 5040 kg

    1 2100
    2 2400
    3 000
    ------------------------------------------

    the Fiat one says

    --------------------------------------------

    3500 kg
    6500 kg

    1. 2100
    2 2400

    -------------------------------------------------

    Which is the one I should be most concerned with
    The Fiat one or the Autotrail one
    And are there any obious ramifications here
    beyond complying with weights..........like speed limits or problems
    driving on the continent.

    many thanks

    barry
     
  2. Wildman

    Wildman Read Only Funster

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    The autotrail plate is the correct one as it takes account of the conversion increasing one weight whilst decreasing the other.
    numbers 1) and 2) weights are the front and rear axle weights which must not be exceeded so do take it to a weigh bridge to check.
    Good luck
     
  3. aba

    aba

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    hi looking at the info you have given its the autotrail one you should use as it looks like they have had the max authorised weight increased from 3500kg to 4000kg
    this is the maximum the van can weigh fully loaded and with full complement of passengers.
    the second figure is the gross train weight which appears to have been downgraded from 6500kg to 5040kg which i can only assume is due to what effect the nose weight of a trailer would have on the rear axle and i assume they have extended the chassis from the factory supplied base vehicle.

    basically if your axles are under the 2100kg for the front and 2400kg for the rear you should be ok but bear in mind that if you have a long overhang at the rear of the van putting 100kg at the rear adds considerably more to the axle due to leverage.
     
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  4. beachcaster

    beachcaster Read Only Funster

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    Seemingly this is good news......but what about the downside ?
    Im sure I read about either speed limitations or no go areas for vehicles over 3500kg on the continent..............???? not sure

    And also the need for a medical at 70 ??

    Just interested what the downsides might be........though I have quite a few years to go.

    its says on a sticker in the garage not to load more than 150kg.......in the garage........spare wheel 2 bikes and some bits ........should be ok there but I will do a thorough excercise to get this right.

    Was concerned about police pulling motorhomes over at Dover ( as well as other places )..and the joys of being jumped on very hard in the case of an accident.

    barry
     
  5. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    sorry...incorrect !

    the two axles combined cant exceed 4000kg, so an actual rear axle loading of 2400kg means a front axle max loading of just 1600kg....and visa versa.

    the extra individual axle loading is to allow for poor longitudinal weight distribution but the total gross vehicle weight should never be exceeded.
     
  6. Wildman

    Wildman Read Only Funster

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    there are speed differances in England and Europe for vehicles over 3,500kgs. In France you are required to display those speed limits in the form of stickers on the rear of the van. I trust you are registered as PHGV and taxed as such (cheaper only £165 per annum)and have the appropriate licence to drive a vehicle of that weight. Tolls are dearer as based on commercial vehicle rates. then yes as you say a medical at 70 to retain the C1 part of your licence. as to being stopped, there are a number of threads and things to be aware of. If you are carrying anything in the garage that is not pursuant to normal use of the motorhome then you are carrying goods and nee an HGV licence. (a motorcycle or scooter would come into this catagory to the letter of the law as would any stock for a car boot/show etc so don't fall foul of that one):Eek!:
     
  7. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    at 4000kg you are in HGV territory in the UK.

    Goods vehicles
    (under 7.5 tonnes maximum laden weight)
    30 (48) urban (except where lower limits are imposed)
    50 (80) A roads
    60 (96) Dual carriageway
    70 (112) Motorway (If articulated, or towing a trailer, limit is 60 mph (96 km/h))
     
  8. beachcaster

    beachcaster Read Only Funster

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    Many thanks to all ..this is very interesting.

    So would I have to keep to these speed limits if I were actually lower than 3500 kg
    or is it the fact that I have the potential to carry 4000 kg that would dictate my category in the uk and in france ?

    Would there be benefits in keeping under 3500 kg

    barry
     
  9. JeanLuc

    JeanLuc Funster

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    In the UK, the limits of 50 on a single carriageway and 60 on a dual, refer to the unladen weight. These limits apply when ULW exceeds 3,050 kg. Not easy to find this figure for a motorhome, however, I would assume yours exceeds it.

    In France the situation is simpler. Limits apply to the GVW (also called MAW, MAM and MTPLM) in your case 4,000 kg. It is this figure that determines the 80 kph limit on single carriageways (vehicles in excess of 3,500 kg GVW) , NOT the actual weight at the time.
     
  10. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    those are the speed limits for heavy goods, regardless of actual weight...but who's to know you are 4000kg and not 3500kg :Wink:

    the speed limits for 3500kg and under are the same as a normal car.

    cant think of any real benefits for being under 3500kg, except the licence issue, but one plus for being over is the road tax cost...£165 pa for over 3500kg...providing its properly registered as private heavy goods, even some large american RV's are wrongly registered as private light goods (up to 3500kg) :Eeek:
     
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