Under sealing and damp precautions

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by atlantisbird, Apr 6, 2012.

  1. atlantisbird

    atlantisbird

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    :rain:
    Here is a question for the professionals out there with a query from a complete novice ( we pick up our new Bentley Indigo next Thursday):BigGrin:
    We have read the problems some people who have had damp ingress and black spots on items in their vans due to not being used or left unused over winter or for extended periods.

    Firstly: Is it a wise decision to have a new vehicle undersealed either DIY or professionally?
    We also read that some companies are not very good is there a recommended body or company if it is a good idea.

    Secondly: is there any device which will both give a flow of air combined with a dehumidifier which can be fed with a solar panel on the roof?

    Third: Is it worth putting a solar panel on a new van from the off and what size or power is enough?

    I know we will get some answers at our first Peterborough show and will find out the cost
    but if someone can put a ball park figure on the above it will be helpful in budgeting.
    With the comments hopefully returned here we can make a list of questions for the traders
    we will meet and our fellow motorhomers in order to make the right decisions.
    Thank you.
    Ann & Harry
    Atlantisbird
     
  2. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    dehumidifiers work best in a warm, sealed environment.

    ventilation will only allow more moist air in to replace the moisture removed by the dehumidifier.

    best thing is warmth and ventilation in winter.

    something like a small oil filled radiator or a 60w tube heater with a couple of windows open a crack.

    remove all soft furnishings into your house and open all internal drawers/cupboards/lockers to allow air movement and stop the 'wood' swelling and jamming doors etc.

    undersealing would be a personal choice.....the floor panels are treated and coated to protect them from water though wax-oil will make them last a lot longer.
    if you have an Alko chassis then its already galvanised and sealing it wont make much difference but the front chassis section and the cab floor would benifit.

    a solar panel will help a lot when off grid but as for size...depends on your normal 12v usage.
    i have a 170w panel on my RV and it seems to keep on top of my usage providing the sun shines.
     
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  3. atlantisbird

    atlantisbird

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    Papajohn's reply

    That is most useful as we had not thought of oil filled radiators which seem fairly safe to use.
    Your other comments actually made sense too even to a novice from near Bridlington :thumb:
    Thank you.

    Kind regards
    Ann & Harry
     
  4. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    word of warning ..

    check with your insurer before using... a member had an oil filled heater go on fire in the home...there was another thread about this.

    Hilldweller contacted his insurer and they said if a portable heater left unattended caused a fire... NOT insured.

    Granted this is a small risk.. but if the insurer won't take the risk, neither would I.
     
  5. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    take heed of Jims warning re: fire, but if you do use an oil heater then its worth standing it on a metal tray....they have been known to leak. :Eeek:

    my RV is left to its own devices in winter.

    i just open all doors/drawers and fully drain the water.
    the only door that had swollen slightly was the toilet door.....and that was tight to start with....but come spring it contracted back to normal.
     
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  6. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    Same here John.. I have never had a heater in any van over winter.. don't even bother taking cushions out.. just keep it well ventilated .. ie roof lights open ajar, never had any damp problems..

    Ask the dealers .. do they heat vans on the forecourt over winter .. I don't think so..
     
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  7. schojac

    schojac Read Only Funster

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    Hi,

    same as posted - fully drain water, including the water filter and toilet, open all cupboards. I do remove cushions and take home but this allows ventilation under seats also. Frequent visit to ensure van is ventilated etc.
     
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