Turbo for Diesel Engine

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by normanandsue, Mar 27, 2012.

  1. normanandsue

    normanandsue Funster

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,298
    Likes Received:
    3,897
    Location:
    Dunfermline - Scotland
    Being a person not in the know about these things, can anyone tell me how important is a [HI]Turbo[/HI] to a Diesel engine for a motorhome? If it is important can they or should they be fitted retrospectively.

    Norman
     
  2. vwalan

    vwalan Funster

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,594
    Likes Received:
    3,853
    Location:
    roche cornwall
    hi if its got one you need it working .if it hasnt well you may have wished you bought the turbo version .
    there was a place tb turbo,s that did an aftermarket version for lots .
    personally i would either sell and get a turbo version or forget it.
    its not really just a case of fitting a turbo. oil ways are different in many etc etc .
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    One of my earlier vans was a Fiat 2.8 non Turbo what a bad mistake that was , didn't keep it long , and lucky I was not to lose too much on it , next van was a 2.8 Turbo what a difference I would never buy or recommend a non Turbo to anyone :thumb:
     
  4. spannermanwigan

    spannermanwigan Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    207
    Location:
    wigan, lancs
    In Total agreement with VW Alan, fitting a turbo to a non turbo engine is a non starter,
    though the engine block can be the same on some vehicles, the internal components
    are designed differently to suit the turbo.Pistons,Camshaft,injectors,valves,fuel pump
    will all be specific to the turbo or non turbo engine.

    Even where a later model has a turbo engine fitted, the cost of installing this engine in an older non turbo vehicle would be hard to justify.

    Hope this answers your question.

    Regards
    Steve:thumb:
     
  5. darklord

    darklord Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    1,241
    Likes Received:
    1,243
    Location:
    essex
    Most diesel engines nowadays are designed to be run with a turbo, it makes one hell of a difference. As for retro fitting, its not cost effective, most engines would need hardened piston tops, you would need a new turbo, manifold, wastegate, manifold bolts and possibly some machining as the manifold heats up more with a turbo. you would need an intercooler, pipework, and be able to get the engine mechanically tuned to work under different parameters.
    All in all, as Alan said, a non turbo should be sold and replaced, your inssurance company will thank you for it.
     
  6. slobadoberbob

    slobadoberbob Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2009
    Messages:
    6,159
    Likes Received:
    1,970
    Location:
    Kent, garden of England
    turbos are great if as standard

    While some will say you can fit them as an after market add on, it is not recommended. Having a turbo as standard seems to give the van more poke... you would notice the difference pulling out from a side road... lack of power without.

    I would not fit one as an after fit myself.. to many issues.


    Bob
     
  7. Swiftroy1

    Swiftroy1 Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2010
    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    172
    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    I've got a non-turbo diesel and have never considered it to be a problem. There's more to go wrong with a more complicated engine and I drive knowing my engines capabilities. There have been a few hills where I've had to select a higher gear but I don't consider that to be a drawback.
    Roy
     
  8. spannermanwigan

    spannermanwigan Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    207
    Location:
    wigan, lancs
    Just to add to previous post,
    Non turbo or naturally aspirated engines are limited to the amount of air they can take into the cylinder by atmospheric presssure, and the effect of draw created on the induction stroke by the piston, this denotes the maximum amount of fuel you can therefore inject, as air and fuel in, equal power out this is the limiting factor.

    The reason for fitting a turbo, is to increase the amount of air you can get into the cylinder in any given amount of time (ie. while inlet valve is open). By increasing the amount of air by utilising the waste gasses in the exhaust to drive the turbo increasing the pressure on the inlet air, you can also increase the amount of fuel in the same time. As increasing the two in the correct ratio, gives a bigger bang, you get more power out, per cylinder.That means without any increase in engine size, you can increase power.

    Further power gains can be acheived by then going to the next stage , Intercooling.
    As the turbo increases the temperature of the air passing through during compressing itand
    convection from the exhaust gasses as these are what drive the turbo, some of the gain is lost due to expansion of the air,therefore by then cooling it down via the intercooler before it reaches the cylinder, it is possible to recover that loss and improve the density of air(hence more oxygen atoms)are getting to the cylinder allowing more fuel again at correct ratio in shortest space of time thereby acheiving even more power.
    Believe it or not I have kept this explanation as simple as possible.

    Hope this explains things clearly.

    regards
    Steve
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. Geo

    Geo Trader - Funster

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2007
    Messages:
    9,544
    Likes Received:
    5,596
    Location:
    Mansfield,Notts
    Well it's near enough :Wink::BigGrin:
     
  10. vwalan

    vwalan Funster

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,594
    Likes Received:
    3,853
    Location:
    roche cornwall
    come on then do a bit on superchargers .ha ha .
    got a friend down the road thats always chopping big digger ones in hlf to fit custom cars . go on give every one another lesson you did a good job on turbo.s .
     
  11. spannermanwigan

    spannermanwigan Read Only Funster

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    207
    Location:
    wigan, lancs
    Well was going to save that for another time, but VWAlan as you insist:BigGrin:

    The first difference between supercharging,and turbo charging is the source of drive.

    Turbos are driven by the waste exhaust gasses,making use of power which would exit through the exhaust and turning it to an advantage, by compressing the inlet air.
    Downside is you get a delay between the pressure exiting the engine as exhaust gas, speeding up the turbo sufficiently to develop enough pressure to provide an increase in power, this is what is known as "turbo lag".


    Superchargers on the other hand are directly driven, usually by a toothed belt similar to a cambelt,they have little or no delay as the drive is constant and they immediately speed up along with the engine so are able to provide pressure directly in relation to engine speed,the downside is that like every other ancillary it takes a percentage of the engines bhp output to drive it,it is therefore taking away power developed to drive itself.

    Mainly used in engines used for ultra high performance, where rapid acceleration is required such as "Drag Racers"

    Hope this is ok

    Regards
    Steve:thumb:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. vwalan

    vwalan Funster

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,594
    Likes Received:
    3,853
    Location:
    roche cornwall
    hi. nicely put .you will have to get a job in a tec college.
    easy to understand . cheers .
    i knew already ha ha .
     
Loading...

Share This Page