The devil's clutch...

Discussion in 'The Beginner' started by Touchwood, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. Touchwood

    Touchwood Funster

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    Our first trip out last weekend, and I had a problem putting the van onto the ramps to level it - tried slipping the clutch for greater control which resulted in some very nasty smells of burning clutch compound - not to be repeated. Again on trip home was a bit late with the clutch on a hill start (the clutch doesn't bite until the pedal is at the top of its travel) the van rolled backwards slightly and again we had some nasty smells.

    So - I'm told it's a new clutch, with only 1000 miles done since fitting (why a new clutch after only 13,500 miles?) Do I have a clutch problem? Or is it just my inexperience with heavy vehicles?

    Vehicle is a Peugot Boxer btw - 2.0 litre turbo diesel - no evidence of clutch slip when driving normally.

    All and any advice welcome, please.
     
  2. rangitira

    rangitira Funster

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    Sounds like it might need a tad ajustment
     
  3. Touchwood

    Touchwood Funster

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    That was my first thought, but I'm informed by those that should know that since it's a hydraulic clutch, rather than cable, adjustment isn't necessary or even possible. :Sad:
     
  4. Geo

    Geo Trader - Funster

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    You are quite right No adjusting method
    The replacment clutch must be a rougue unit, it does happen, or something else is amiss it should be done under warranty assuming it was done proffesionaly using quality parts and any other causes should be looked into such as weeping crankshaft oil seal contaminating the unit,in which case warranty wont cover it:Doh:
    another thought was it a dual mass flywhell type if so was the whole unit replaced as is the proper but expensive way, or short cut drive plate only jobbie
     
  5. rangitira

    rangitira Funster

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    Isn't there opportunity for a small ajustment on the clutch throw out lever? Or is it all internal?

    Or :Doh: :help: Have things have changed since the model T?
     
  6. E560 Lady

    E560 Lady Read Only Funster

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    E560 Lady

    Hi,
    NOT that I am an engineer or anything like that, but on 'Swift Talk' there are lots of posts about the clutch on the Fiat Ducato having problems in reverse gear especially uphill. Perhaps it is the same thing with the Boxer? Sorry to be a Jonah, but try your dealer.
     
  7. Chris

    Chris Funster Life Member

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    My clutch stinks when I am parking the van. it's a Fiat Ducato.

    I always put it down to a crap driver.

    Have I any hope that it's not just me ?
     
  8. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    my money's on inexperience, too many revs and too much clutch feathering.....

    easiest way onto ramps, until you gain experience, is a slow and gentle run up from a couple of feet away hitting the brakes near the top and gentle rolling back down until level.

    if you overshoot it ain't the end of the world....just a bit of embarrassment and a bump.

    its a lot of weight for a relatively small engine to be pulling away uphill, whether on a hill or onto ramps, and a lot of revs and clutch slipping may be needed from standstill.

    if the clutch definately isnt slipping when driving normally i certainly wouldnt replace it yet.
     
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  9. Touchwood

    Touchwood Funster

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    Thanks

    Thanks to all. :thumb:

    I suspect that Geo's reply has the most weight (he is a motor vehicle engineer) but as usual we prefer the answer that's closest to what we wanted to hear, which is Pappajohn's, so I'm going with that for now! :BigGrin:

    We'll be having plenty of short local excursions before we attampt any long distance trips, so hopefully if there is a problem it will manifest itself without causing a major inconvenience. :Smile:
     
  10. simsy56

    simsy56 Funster

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    Having been a mechanic in my earlier life, and still do some mechanics, i should say to anyone who rides a clutch should fit one! And you will never do it again!
    Too many revs, and riding the clutch is a recipe for disaster. A bit like coming down the alps in neutral and relying totally on the brakes. How long would they last?

    Craig
     
  11. Touchwood

    Touchwood Funster

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    I take your point Craig, and agree - perhaps I should point out that I've been driving (cars) for some 48 years now, and never - repeat never - needed a clutch replacement in any of the many and diverse cars I've owned. One of my questions I suppose should be "is there a necessarily different technique avoiding ANY clutch slipping for driving heavier vehicles"
     
  12. simsy56

    simsy56 Funster

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    Sorry Touchwood, i wasn't inferring you were to blame, it was a general observation.
    Now, after being a mechanic for a number of years, i went on to be an HGV class one driver, all over the UK, Europe, and the middle east, and the way i drove was let the clutch bite then feed in the power as the clutch was engaging, not a boot full of revs then feed in the clutch.
    You can set off on tick over with a diesel, if you feed the clutch in gently. They have a lot of grunt do diesels. I also changed up gears very quickly, not thrashing it in each gears, which i have heard a lot of people do, especially a lot of delivery drivers.
    My last articulated truck was a Volvo which i completed over a quarter of a million kilometers in, and never needed a clutch.
    Slipping or riding a clutch is just wearing down the plates, leading to replacement.

    Craig
     
  13. Touchwood

    Touchwood Funster

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    No offence taken Craig - I was just trying to make the point that I am confident my normal driving technique is fine - for cars - I rarely slip the clutch at all but you can slip a little in a car - for example to hold the vehicle on a hill briefly - without any apparent detriment. Possibly not in a heavier vehicle though.

    As for setting off on tickover with a diesel, having driven diesel cars for many years I agree this is usually easily achieved - but my van doesn't seem to like it much - it requires a small amount of slipping to work and that's what seems to be the problem.
     
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