Starting and stopping.

Discussion in 'Tech/Mech General' started by Snowbird, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    Being what is known as old school I have always started the van and let it run a few minutes before driving off to allow the oil to get round the parts that need it especially the turbo. Also after a hard drive I allow the engine to tick over for a few minutes before switching off. I was always taught never to work a cold horse or put away a hot one.
    I have noticed more than ever people starting up and driving off immediately without warming there engine and switching off as soon as the vehicle stops. On motorways in France more so than here in the UK its seems the practice on service areas to open the bonnet on cars to allow the engine to cool down. What do you funsters do ?.
     
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  2. knokinonabit

    knokinonabit Funster

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    Same as you :thumb:
     
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  3. vwalan

    vwalan Funster

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    i try not to drive on motor ways . ha ha .
     
  4. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    Thats cos there arnt any in Cornwall :Rofl1:
     
  5. thehutchies

    thehutchies Funster

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    I know a chap who works in engine development for Audi (I think) and he says the worst thing you can do to an engine is leave it idling from cold. Apparently, the oil doesn't circulate effectively and it causes extreme wear.

    I don't suppose a minute or two would matter but what about people who run their engine for an hour to charge their batteries?
     
  6. vwalan

    vwalan Funster

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    i know and i can get all the way to england then to spain with out using them . and the motor still isnt hot .
    hee hee
    but yes ,sit for awhile or check tyres etc .
    i dont worry so much when i stop as i dont drive that fast really .
    unfortunately many do thrash their vehicles . i try not to let the red light come on in my tacho .so very often dont go over 40mph .
    even though i dont have to abide by 40.
     
  7. Ed Excel

    Ed Excel Funster

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    Don't intentionally wait to set off but by the time I've started the motor and finished the 'flight checks' I go. I always understood it was better to drive off to warm up the engine. I do, however, wait to switch off to allow the turbo to calm down. It's probably not a good idea to remove its oil supply at umpteen thousand revs!
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2013
  8. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    I agree with that. Leaving an engine idling for extended periods is not good practice. Have you ever noticed what comes out of the exhaust after an engine has been left idling for any length of time. All that blue smoke is oil that has passed the rings.
     
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  9. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    40 MPH :Eeek:. Now I know why you dont use motorways Al. No tractors allowed :Rofl1:
     
  10. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    I start up and pull away as soon as the handbrake can be released.
    I stop the engine as soon as the handbrake is on and out of gear.

    Having said that I keep the van at or below 2500rpm. Maxing out to 3,000 rpm very very rarely when overtaking or pulling quickly out of a junction.
     
  11. 1_man_and_his_dob(lo)

    1_man_and_his_dob(lo) Funster

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    Same here...in fact that last comment I've seen mentioned quite a few times in magazine Q&A sections and seems to be more of an issue with modern high-speed turbos.

    Just checked my Doblo manual (which I think they could have worded a bit better):

    "Do not warm the engine when the vehicle is stationary or at high or low revs: in this way the engine will warm up gradually increasing consumption and emissions. You should drive off slowly straight away avoiding high revs so that the engine will warm up more quickly."

    Doesn't mention anything about engine wear...just MPG and emissions :Confused:

    I've noticed that my 3-year-old Doblo warms up much faster than my 11-year-old C3 ever has. Both common-rail diesels, but at least one generation apart.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2013
  12. ehuplad

    ehuplad Read Only Funster

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    letting the engine idle is not good for it. it also puts a lot of extra soot into the oil, best to start up and pull away but not reving to high until it has warmed up.

    If you have been working the engine hard and then stop it, this is also not good as the oil in the turbo overheats, also makes a lining in the supply pipe (bit like arteries clogging up).

    We once ran a brand new engine for 1000hrs on tickover, was not a pretty site when it was stripped down.
     
  13. alfandM

    alfandM Funster

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    Iam an old school like you Dave and was brought up to look after what you have what ever the age,thats why we have a 30 year old MH and a 20 year old Volvo,on our government inspection every year they congratulate us on a well presented vehicles, and they just dont sit around under cover,we use them all year round with temps down to -30 and running on winter roads , so again it doesn't mater what you have, its how you look after it,just like ya wife,:Rofl1:so thats my 2pennys worth, and thanks Dave for an interesting subject ,good travels to ya and regards Alf .:thumb:
     
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  14. Steve

    Steve Funster Life Member

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    I don’t count myself as old school but I like to try and treat my motors as I do myself. I don’t like to jump out of bed and run about so the motor is treated the same start it up put the seat belt on check my mirrors adjust heating controls may or not put on radio move off. On a cold engine 1500/2000rpm is quiet sufficient. But as it’s a Fiat I never use top gear until 5/10 miles.
    When all is up to temps I drive as required. If I have been driving A roads then no need to wait when stopped as nothing very hot turn off engine. But if I have been pushing hard I always let the turbo spin down and cool for a minute before turning off. I may well be that my driving habits make no difference to anything, it just what I do.
     
  15. Bellini

    Bellini Funster

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    I can't comment on my MH yet as I've not got it, but my practice has always been to reduce start-up idling to a minimum and to drive gently when the engine is cold. Note that 'cold' means both coolant AND engine oil and it takes a lot longer for the latter to warm up.

    That said, on diesels I rarely use high rpm's anyway as the torque is usually sufficient for reasonable progress without needing to wring the engine's neck.

    Of further note is also the oil in the drivetrain, so gearbox and axles. It's important to warm that up as well. A warm engine and cold drivetrain....:Wink:

    Winter-temperature cold (EP90) oil in the two axles and gearboxes of my 40 year-old Series 3 Land Rover will hold him on a moderate hill quite happily without the handbrake...
     
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