Small trolley jack?

Discussion in 'Tech/Mech General' started by Northerner, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. Northerner

    Northerner Read Only Funster

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    I'm considering buying a small trolley jack as it must be easier to use than the scissor jack that comes with my 'van. Presumably lifting a corner of a 3.5 ton 'van does not require a jack that will lift 3.5 tons? Will I be OK with something like this?

    http://tinyurl.com/2wfgmaa

    Thanks.
     
  2. Dodgey

    Dodgey Funster

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    Capacity wise, that'll be fine for picking up individual corners.
     
  3. grumps147

    grumps147 Funster

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    I used to drive a big van, which had similar sized wheels and a scissor jack. Part of the familiarisation with all the gizmos and electronics inside was also to try and change the spare. I did it in a garage with no wind or rocking from passing HGV's.
    It frightened me to death.

    We arranged with our fleet manager that if we got a puncture a tyre company would come out.

    Its less to do with the type of jack, though I would prefer a hydraulic any time, but the movement. As well as any jack I would use an axle stand now on my motorhome (must put one in the locker).
     
  4. haganap

    haganap Funster Life Member

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    I purchased a small but adeqautely rated bottle jack that it easy to store and much easier to use. I have used it to good effect
     
  5. Douglas

    Douglas Read Only Funster

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    I use a very similar jack on my MH with no problems, also LIDL have a 3 tone trolley for 14 or £15 but rush as it may have been last weeks offer.

    Doug...
     
  6. Northerner

    Northerner Read Only Funster

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    Thank you. This is the sort of information I was hoping to get. Any more advice on the advantages and disadvantages of a trolley jack or bottle jack will be appreciated.
     
  7. Landy lover

    Landy lover Funster

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    If you are on unstable ground it can sometimes be difficult to get something like a block of wood to fit under a trolley jack where as a good bottle jack is easier - personally I would invest in a few strong pieces of plywood for a base and a good 3 tonne bottle jack just make sure it is low enough when closed so that it goes under the axle OK with a flat tyre
     
  8. upmarkethippy

    upmarkethippy Read Only Funster

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    trolley or bottle

    Hi,
    I have used both types of jacks to almost destruction.

    I say almost, because i have destroyed trolley jacks but not bottle jacks.

    Trolley jacks are very good for stability, but, they are also there own worse enemy. They do need very flat smooth ground to work on as they need to roll to compensate for the jack lifting on an arc. They also take up an amazingly large amount of space.

    A bottle jack is in my eyes a much more practicle jack, It takes up less space, and is almost as stable when used on hard surface. And i have yet to destroy one as there is no frame to twist.
    :thumb:


    A land rover discovery botle jack is a two part telescopic one. is very short when down but does lift up a long way. also well with in the lifting capabilities needed for a 3.5 ton motorhome
     
  9. Terry

    Terry Funster

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    BOTTLE JACK FOR US twisted a 2 ton trolley jack with surprising ease :Eeek:plus it was hard to pump up
     
  10. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    I read it as lifting just 3 inches.

    Is that right ? Is that enough ?
     
  11. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    Agree with upmarkethippy.

    trolley great for the workshop on a smooth floor, bottle much better for emergency use.

    I have a 5.0 ton bottle which I used to change the wheels on an 8.5 t RV

    but as already advised, check the axle clearance before buying.. bearing in mind with a flat tyre you have a lot less clearance.
     
  12. Sundowners

    Sundowners Funster Life Member

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    I have destroyed bottle jacks BUT only by lifting at just above their rated capacity-----buy one with some safety margin---------they are small, light and very good--------------make sure when not being used that they have the ram and pump plunger right in----so that the shiney bits dont rust:thumb: and pick up a couple of ply pads------which can also be used for levelling
    Nigel
    BTW-------IF you were unable to get jack under suitable jack point----drive onto your levelling block to lift that wheel
     
  13. Scotties

    Scotties Funster Life Member

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    Clever Sundowners, I've never managed to operate the trolley jack once under the back axle. Although if by a main road trying to roll onto a ramp (esp if the tyre is down) might be a little taxing,:Doh:

    Richard
     
  14. JJ

    JJ Funster

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    I am with Upmarkethippy and Haganap on this matter...

    Given the rare times I actually had to change a wheel "on the road" I changed from a trolley jack to a bottle jack to save space (a decision that was helped when my trolley jack was nicked...)

    JJ
     
  15. Taran_Las

    Taran_Las Funster

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    I don't know the weight of an equivalent bottle jack but the trolley jack I have in the garage is bloody heavy (lifts 2 ton). And due to it having 4 wheels it likes to move around a lot when not stowed safely. It's a MachineMart jack too.
     
  16. Northerner

    Northerner Read Only Funster

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    Thanks everyone. It looks like it's going to be a bottle jack. First I need to take some measurements to make sure that it goes low enough and high enough.
     
  17. pudseykeith

    pudseykeith Read Only Funster

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    Hi. A bottle jack as advised by the funsters would be best. An important point though - don,t fully trust anything hydrolic, Always carry a axel stand or something to support the vehicle should the jack malfunction or slip out when you have a wheel off or with you under it or next to it. It is always advised to carry a few stout blocks of wood for hight adjustment or to keep it stable on softish ground.:thumb:
    Pudseykeith
     
  18. Douglas

    Douglas Read Only Funster

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    If you can't get you bottle jack under the axial the start it with the scissors the use the bottle, on the way down but something under the wheel for it to sit on and leave room for the bottle jack to out.

    Also if your bottle jack has a small contact on the axle carry a small plate of steel as I have seen the axial dented by the pressure.

    I have made one that is "U" shaped and had a keeps welded on the bottom to discourage sliding. I also carry a block of wood should the worst happen.


    Doug...
     
  19. slobadoberbob

    slobadoberbob Read Only Funster

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    me? I use both a bottle and scissor jack

    I have both sorts on the RV.. I put the scissor jack under the Reece tow hitch when parked up to give a bit more support the the back end of the RV (Bathroom runs across the back on my Winnibago) and I have the bottle jack 4 tons in case I need it. The scissor Jack is only rated to 1.5 ton so it is used mainly for the tow ball hitch area.. but if need be I can use the two together.

    Neither very expensive...came from screwfix direct...

    Bob:thumb:
     
  20. haganap

    haganap Funster Life Member

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    My methodology is that I loosen the bolts on the wheel, I then utilise the bottle Jack to lift the wheel. I then have my scissor jack undone to it's nearly full potential thus reducing the difficulties in using it to lift the van (which is hard). Wheel removed I place this underneath the axle just in case,,, on the basis that should anything happen the cost of a replacement wheel will be better than replacig my fingers and alike should the van crash off the jack.

    I also have to have a couple of strong wooden blocks to use with the bottle jack as it alone (neither will the scissor) lift the coach built body high enough at the back end to get the rear wheel out. YOU MUST CHECK THIS, VANS DIFFER GREATLY FROM COACHBUILTS.

    I also would reccomend ensuring that you have located, unscrewed, and got ready the replacement tyre, This is because on mine it means actually crawling under the van to get it out. :Eek!: not a task to be completed with the van secured on Jacks.

    Punctures, are more rare than they used to be but still occur (had two on cars this year:Angry:) and it may be worth carrying some of the newer puncture emergency stuff that they use. Alhtough its yet to be successful when I have used it, (several years ago on motorbikes) I believe the more modern stuff is actually quite good. It may be the difference between you trying to carry the above out on a busy main road and finding a safe place to stop and attend to the job safely.

    I have used my Jack for different reasons. Mainly when skiing and not being able to drive on to ramps to level the van. I have jacked up, slid ramps underneath and bingo. I have used on some very bizzarre sufaces. with great success :thumb:

    This isn't advice, merely how I complete mine. (disclaimer):Wink:
     
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