Picking Wild Mushrooms

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by madbluemad, Oct 22, 2010.

  1. madbluemad

    madbluemad

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    My Daughter in law and her dad do a lot of mushroom picking. They've been doing it for a very long time and so they know a good one from a bad one.

    I've had a share of the spoils many a time and their delicious.

    Ive tried reading up on it on the web but I'm still to scared that I may poison myself or somebody else.

    Do any other funsters forage for mushrooms or anything else come to that.

    Jim
    :Smile:
     
  2. Bailey58

    Bailey58 Funster Life Member

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    We've now got mushrooms growing in the ex-sportsfield that backs onto our garden. My neighbour eats them, "I've got a book on 'em" but we'd rather go to Sainsbury's. :Eek!:
     
  3. Wildman

    Wildman Read Only Funster

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    always forage, fungi nuts and berries, plus occasional wild plants.
     
  4. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    Its a national pastime in France,made easier as you can take your mushrooms into any chemist and they will tell you which are edible.
    Its a pity Boots dont do the same service here.
     
  5. madbluemad

    madbluemad

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    Thats a good idea.
    Jm
    :Smile:
     
  6. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    One we picked and ate in Scotland ..

    Chanterelle (Cantharellus cibarius)
    [​IMG]

    Locals were picking and selling to the local hotel .. so we tried them..absolutely delicious
     
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  7. thehutchies

    thehutchies Funster

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    We do a fair bit of foraging.
    We've recently had apples, pears, crab apples, damsons, blackberries, hazelnuts, sweet chestnuts, redcurrants, elderflowers, elderberries, ramsons and various herbs.
    Everything but mushrooms because my wife's allergic to them!
     
  8. Douglas

    Douglas Read Only Funster

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    Been doing it for years, also make wine from wild fruit. just a 1/2 mile away we have an old horse race track and that gives up a lot of mushrooms but you have to be up before sunrise to get any, the most notable event was feeding the crews of 5 boats on 1 puff ball, (LYCOPERDON spp. and CALVATIA spp.) it was the size of a football.

    Doug...
     
  9. betty swallux

    betty swallux Read Only Funster

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    Fungi

    Fantastic hobby
    Only the Insect family has more variants, there are lots of good books out there to keep you right on Positive identification
    A good pocket field guide is the "Collins Gem Mushrooms and Toadstools Photoguide" which will help in id, but "how to Identify edible Mushrooms by Harding,Lyon and Tomblin Published by Harper Collins is a must have to stay safe.
    :thumb:
     
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  10. CHRI$

    CHRI$ Funster

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    iv been foraging for years,well untill security at tesco caught me with my arse stuck out there biffa bin.:Rofl1:
     
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  11. bobandjanie

    bobandjanie Funster Life Member

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    There is only one fungi I happily forage for and that is 'the puffball' as my Father's old Arthur Mees Children's Encyclopaedia informed me years ago... 'There is only one fungi that looks like a puffball and that is a puffball'.
    Friends have been known to forage and despite being reasonably well informed and with lots of lovely 'spotter' books his wife always lets her husband eat the spoils a day before he cooks the rest up for her. Yes, he has been ill before now which reinforces her cunning plan!
    Anyone watched the film 'Into The Wild'? I saw it recently and it makes you think, be careful! So sad I was in floods of tears. http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Into_the_Wild_(film) Jane
     
  12. whingyraindrop

    whingyraindrop Funster

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    Nope, but I have met a few in A + E that have, and wished they hadn't!

    Lorraine x
     
  13. betty swallux

    betty swallux Read Only Funster

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    Fungi

    Unfortunately there are a hell of a lot of lookalike non edible fungi, a previous post featured a Chantrerelle cibarius its lookalike is the Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca or False Chanterelle, its of a different family the Paxillus, and its spore print is of a different colour to the True Chanterelle.
    Although the False Chanterelle will cause nausea and occasionally hallucinations there are far more lethal ones that resemble tasty edible fungi and thats why a good ID book showing spore prints and other factors is a must for any would be forager.
     
  14. Drew

    Drew Funster

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    My advise to people who go foraging is not to eat anything until they know with absolute certainty what it is.
    In my line of work, I'm a countryside ranger, I run several events about wild food and medicine. I am quite knowledgeable on many edible plants but fungi and the medicinal uses of plants are a whole subject on their own, I bring in people with specialist knowledge for those bits.
    Having said that wild garlic hummus is to die for, and foccacia bread with wild garlic is yummy. Dock pudding is something of an acquired taste but safe, and easy to make.
    If you are new to foraging I would suggest looking out for fungi forays or wild food walks as a good place to start. Maybe we could do a wild food meet sometime?

    All the best and good hunting:thumb::thumb::thumb:
     
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