Overheating Problem !

Discussion in 'The Beginner' started by Jofski, Oct 1, 2010.

  1. Jofski

    Jofski Read Only Funster

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    Hi everyone. Hope you are enjoying the rain and the Ryder Cup as much as me !

    Got a serious overheating issue. Advice needed please !

    I live at the top of a very steep hill that is about 1 and a half miles long. Have to stay in 2nd the whole way. Yesterday, returning from the garage, I took the hill on for the first time as there are alternative [longer] routes that arent so severe - but I gave it a go.

    Bad idea. Engine overheated and then there was a smell of buring and then thick smoke started oozing into the cab. I was almost home so kept going and then opened the hood and thankfully no engine fire !

    BUt the overheating is a big worry. I will def have to put it back into the garage, but I would like to know the standard operating temperature on these older vehicles as I am so used to driving a modern car.

    After merely a few minutes, the gauge is up to 100+. Its worse when idling, and can drop to 80 in a few seconds when I am cruising on the flat - the gauge fluctuates a lot in short timeframe actually.

    Can I have some 'standard' pointers / temp levels please for a good functioning cooling system on my type pf vehicle (Hymer 1984 2.9d [409d])

    Im thinking thermo / fans / head gasket - in that order - is the problem. Am i wide of the mark ?

    THANKS !!
     
  2. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    Hi

    could also be a partially blocked radiator ... try flushing but if it's an old rad it may require replacing .. may also be the water pump ,

    I had a similar problem with a Fiat Siecento .. fine on normal driving but overheated in traffic and climbing in low gear .. new rad cured it.
     
  3. Dodgey

    Dodgey Funster

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    Yup, could be rad but also, air lock in system(does the heater get good and hot and stay stable heat wise), thermostat on the blink (unlikely but possible) and fan. Is it a viscous fan coupling, or electric? If viscouse it could be it's tired and not spinning fast enough when needed, if electric does it work period?

    Older vehicles tend to run around 80-88 degrees C, so an indicated 80 sounds about right.
     
  4. welsh winger

    welsh winger Read Only Funster

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    Another vote for the rad, try flushing it in the reverse flow to normal, sounds a silly suggestion but use some strong traffic film remover and leave it to soak for a while.

    Nick
     
  5. bigmillie

    bigmillie Read Only Funster

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    Hi we run a old 207d 1986 vintage 2.4 ( 4 cyl version your has 5 ) , the handbook states that normal operating temp is 70 - 95 deg but operation upto 100 degs for 10 mins is permissible :Eeek:



    When I got mine it also suffered from overheating we fitted a new rad and removed the old cooling fan fitted an electric one, this made quite a improvement , although it will still hit 100 degs going up a steep hill in 2nd, then use old dodge switch heater on full blast
    ( we have fitted an additional heater matrix in rear of van ) which helps to reduce engine temp :thumb:

    one for sale on ebay.de (in Germany)

    http://cgi.ebay.de/Kuhler-MERCEDES-...9296?pt=Autoteile_Zubehör&hash=item255b3a7b70

    regards Charlie
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2010
  6. rainbow chasers

    rainbow chasers Read Only Funster

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    I would start with th temp sensor/thermostat - make sure that is kicking in at the right temp. Test the fan, if viscous you can cheat and weld the centre so it stays on all the time, if electric, make sure it is cutting in.

    Second electric fan would be a good option - if you have the skills, you can pick one up from a scrap yard and make one up, that can vbe turned on a switch should you be 'working' the engine, or stuck in traffic.

    Flush the cooling system through and add coolant/antifreeze afterwards.
     
  7. johng

    johng Read Only Funster

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    Last edited: Oct 1, 2010
  8. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    Am on the route of a partialy blocked rad.
    Its not difficult to remove,so take it off and empty the contents preferably onto an old bed sheet so you can examin the contents.If the rad feels heavy after its empty then its probably gumed up.You can try backflushing but at the age of the van and if its the original rad then I dont hold much for your chances of dislodging the gunk by backflushing.Have never had a flushing agent that will remove time baked gunge in radiaters.
    Best bet is to replace,otherwise its going to be costly in the end.
    There used to be radiater repairers around that could recore your rad but am afraid not many left now due to the throw away nature of modern radiaters,you may be lucky though,its worth a try in yellow pages.Serks used to do them,but dont know now.Best of luck.
     
  9. Dodgey

    Dodgey Funster

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    And carrying on from Dave, if it's an old style rad, ie all metal, it may be possible to get it rebuilt with a thicker (more) core to improve cooling, just a thought?:thumb:
     
  10. welsh winger

    welsh winger Read Only Funster

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    Hi Jofski

    just noticed you are from Swansea, try swansea radiators in llansamlet, down the road beside car arena, they do recores. Nick


    Swansea Radiators & Autoparts

    Units 9 & 10 Clarion Court

    Clarion Close

    Swansea Enterprise Park

    Swansea

    SA6 8RF

    01792 793344
     
  11. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    One more thought...those old Mercs trundle around all over North Africa,which is a damn sight hotter than South Wales in October with no problems at all.They are ALL grossley overloaded,so thats the main reason am leaning towards a blocked rad.I repeat dont trust backflushing...not with the age of the vehicle.
     
  12. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    I agree, and backflushing may push crap into the engine block's water ways ..

    one other thought.. you have checked there is nothing blocking the rad .. a piece of plastic or such like .. or even a build up of dirt, leaves etc between the fins .. ?
     
  13. Jofski

    Jofski Read Only Funster

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    thank you all so much ! Sorry fopr the delay - been away from a pc.

    Feel happier knowing the temperature ranges in the manual - seem to match mine.

    Will address the pointers re: RAD first. Let you know ho I go !

    Thanks all - a bunch of diamonds you lot are !

    :Smile:
     
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