Older motorhomes

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by JumboBeef, Nov 18, 2009.

  1. JumboBeef

    JumboBeef Read Only Funster

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  2. Johns_Cross_Motorhomes

    Johns_Cross_Motorhomes Trader - Motorhome & Accessory Sales

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    Things to watch out for is body rot (rust) and DAMP.

    Peter
     
  3. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    Depending on condition that could be "The Thinking Man's ( or Woman's ) MH".

    Probably better built than the modern plasticky ones. And as long as it has all the right facilities you are laughing all the way to the bank - to draw out very little money.
     
  4. JJ

    JJ Funster

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    I have always bought old motorhomes and have never regretted it. You get so many more "bangs for your bucks" as they say...

    JJ
     
  5. Richardn

    Richardn Read Only Funster

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    You get a lot more for your money buying a Yank though. If you can cope with the extra size!
     
  6. ArenqueRojo

    ArenqueRojo Read Only Funster

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    We had a 20 year old Pilote based on Talbot Express.
    Solid as a rock.
    The big advantage of the older vehicle is that you can mod them without feeling that you are destroying the resale value.
    Net result is you are more likely to get the vehicle you want.
    Make sure that the chassis is sound. All else is replaceable/repairable. Even damp is easier to cure on older machines - and less likely too, IMHO.
    Patrick
     
  7. lebesset

    lebesset Read Only Funster

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    old hymers seem to go on for ever ! and hold their price :Smile:
     
  8. JumboBeef

    JumboBeef Read Only Funster

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    Thanks! Intereting responces.

    I am tempted by a Yank but 1/ the MH can only have a max lenght of about 20' (ish) due to a tight turn onto my drive from the lane outside and 2/ although I love V8's, I'd rather have 25mpg than 12.........
     
  9. Bulletguy

    Bulletguy Read Only Funster

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    Not that much of a bargain really. I'm surprised he got that much.

    When I was searching for a camper I spotted a 1990 one of these mh's on Auto Trader for £1750. It was well underpriced and was sold in less than two hours of it appearing on the site.

    MH/camper prices are pretty much wide open. Another example I spotted only last year was a trader selling a 1996 P reg Ford Transit Duetto for just £9.5k. Needless to say that had sold immediately too (just try and find a P reg Duetto at that price even now!).

    Best thing is just keep scouring the ads.....eventually you will find a genuine bargain....but there aren't that many!
     
  10. clayx

    clayx Read Only Funster

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    if you are thinking of buying an older m/h then the autosleeper talisman takes a bit of whacking , my first van was a 92 talisman and it was like new, you would struggle to buy a better built van today.
     
  11. Onderweg

    Onderweg Funster

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    I also bought an older model works great with us. Ours is a Fiat Ducato built 1991, Buerstner.

    Besides the good remarks already made:
    1. i prefer the 2.5 TD (turbo/diesel), has got a lot more power than the regular. I hate to be a snail on the highway or in the mountains
    2. check whether it has power steering, without it it will be a good muscle training, especially when you are driving in the mountains
    3. make sure you know the age and state of the timing belt
    4. have the motor checked thoroughly

    Hope you will have a lot of fun

    Paul and Ineke
     
  12. ourcampersbeentrashed

    ourcampersbeentrashed Funster

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    We have an old 1990 Talbot Express and to be quite honest, as long as you have it properly inspected and check for damp and ensure everything works as it should you should have no problems.

    You do need to be aware that manufacturers have no obligation to provide spare parts once a vehicle reaches 10 years old. Some Talbot Express parts are difficult to get hold of.
     
  13. danie_jc

    danie_jc Read Only Funster

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    I have an H reg Merc 100D and its great! 30+ mpg, lots of legroom for driver (very important for me as I am 6'5"), nice size 18' long and 2 double beds. Best advice is to view a load and ensure that it has a layout that will work for you, then check for rot and damp and that water/heater/rings/shower etc works.
     
  14. MAUBRI

    MAUBRI Funster

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    It all comes down to individual circumstances i.e.finance, whether you want comfort over economy and also whether you are abled bodied enough to jump in to cab over beds or even garage over.

    We have had 4 vans over the last 20 years started with 1977 Sherpa Highwayman, soon learned that I didn't want to have to make beds when someone was feeling poorly thus causing inconvienence to everyone else. Or being trampled underfoot when the kids wanted to exit the van. Changed to a Americano Monte Carlo which was a Volkswagen LT40 base vehicle ( 2 Litre petrol Audi engine ) modified by a company in the midlands during the early 80's I believe they made about 10 and also a smaller Monte Cristo model these were a cheaper copy of the earlier American R V's, The layout was 4 seater Dinette in the front behind 2 fixed cab seats with Luton over for two adults, centre Kitchen with shower oppossite and double bed at the rear. This van we found as comfortable as our current R V it was unfortuneatly very underpowered weighing in at 3.8 ton. It died whilst pressure washing one day in 2004 I cut the roof off, i.e. the aluminium side panels had aged so much they had become weak at the edges of the roof line and what I thought was a dirty mark was actualy the wall insulation. After doing my sums as regards the cost of repair vs resale value, it had to go. Next we had a Hymer 1996 24 foot with Garage, mechanicaly I couldn't fault it, never let me down in the 4 years that we owned it, personaly inside I felt was like craming a quart into a pint pot, everything worked and the standard of workmanship was far better than any English at that time. However due to being stuck on gradual slopes of grass on two occassions plus my wife having a fall and being unable to get in the over garage bed it had to go.

    Next we went to Rexhall Vision 1997 American R V 7.5L petrol /LPG.
    The main advantages, No climbing into bed and everything you should ever need and the capacity to cater for at least 5 days with out filling or emptying anything, absolute bliss.

    Disadvantages only two that I can think of MPG and size, on some occassions it is to wide/length. So you use your little grey cells and only go where you no you can, if a single decker Bus can go down a road so can you.

    Costs bearing in mind we are covering a 20 year period so the Sherpa was £1450, The LT40 was £10,000. The Hymer was £25,000 and the R.V. was £14,400 with a £2000 LPG conversion. So running an R.V. isn't realy as expensive as you first think. The vehicle is of a similar build quality to the Hymer but with ALL the extras as normal in a greater space which gives you better comfort. All vehicles other than the Sherpa had Toads and the difference in fuel consumption was negligible in fact with the LT 40 I had an Automatic Hyundi Accent on a Ambulance and toured all round western Scotland :Doh

    Hope that helps any newby with ideas

    brian
     
  15. Mikemoss

    Mikemoss Read Only Funster

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    I'm another fan of older motorhomes, although as others have said: condition is everything with rust - and particularly damp - being the absolute deal breakers.

    My son-in-law and daughter have a 1996 Compass Navigator which is still sound as a pound, while our own 1998 Bessacarr E695 remains in solid good health. Neither of them is old in the grand scheme of things, but while they may lack the glitz and frills or their more recent sucessors they do seem to be more strongly built - maybe as a result of their relative simplicity.

    To my mine, the rot seems to have started to set in from around 2000/2001. We've looked at British, Germany and Italian motorhomes from this decade onwards and they somehow seem flimsier than those from the 1990s. You also tend to get more in the way of space and basic quality for your money, and with lighter weights too (which is something I can't fathom out).

    I'd also go for a higher mileage vehicle: sitting around and doing nothing is no more good for vehicles than it is for humans.
     
  16. Bulletguy

    Bulletguy Read Only Funster

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    As with most, finances should dictate the choice though some allow the heart to rule their head and whack up a fat loan.

    Personally I would priorotise parts availabilty and maintenance costs, ie, how much does a cambelt job cost or clutch replacement? Things like that. One guy on here had to fork out £10 grand for a new engine simply because they 'don't do re-con', whilst another could not get something as simple as a fuel filler cap for a five year old motorhome. Thats just plain crazy.

    Look around at what is popular on the road. The more common the better. Choose one with a 'common as muck' base vehicle and you won't go far wrong. Buy something obscure, and you risk being stuck at the side of the road.

    I chose a Ford Transit for this very reason. It's sixteen years old........but I can still get brand new parts for it 'off the shelf', plus used parts are plentiful and easily sourced, and it's cheap and simple to maintain.
     
  17. Hayleylulu

    Hayleylulu

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    older motorhomes are like older women do i need to say Moore
     
  18. American Dream

    American Dream Read Only Funster

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    With a bit of TLC,Know-how, dedication and attention they are as reliable and more Fun than a younger model.:Cool:
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2009
  19. American Dream

    American Dream Read Only Funster

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    I have a 30 year old rv and I still can get parts for it.

    If I can't, I submit the Dimensions and get it made, or make it myself.

    It actually gives me more satisfaction than doing things the easy way.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2009
  20. MAUBRI

    MAUBRI Funster

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    I concur, although my RV isn't as old, my first trip was 400 miles so learning all the time whilst driving home from Ipswich, arrived home and reversed into my own wooden gate and broke the rear left tail light cluster. On to the web and there they were still readily available. Virtualy all the american RV 's up to around 2000 used the same light clusters so they are on the shelf albeit sometimes not in the same congiguration but you just swap the lens around. Its the same with the chassis cab Ford F-460 no problem getting any part secondhand or new, I find I can go on an american web site find the part numbers then order it over here or if not available get it direct from the states then fit it myself.
    I would never buy new even if I won the lottery, let someone else iron out all the problems then buy when its about 4 years old after the first MOT just to be safe.

    Brian
     
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