Obituaries

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by haganap, Apr 15, 2012.

  1. haganap

    haganap Funster Life Member

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  2. sue1959

    sue1959 Read Only Funster

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    Try www.findagrave.com
    Some realy interesting ones on there. All American but never mind. actually found an ancester of mine on it, Someone I'd been loking for for ages!
    I like reading old grave stones.
     
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  3. American Dream

    American Dream Read Only Funster

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    I know what you mean.
    Respect those who fought for our freedom.

    :thanks2:
     
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  4. jhorsf

    jhorsf Read Only Funster

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    People are still fighting for our freedom every day all over the world and then we get all these people moaning and threatening strikes due to their idea of hardship:shout:
     
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  5. Soaringman

    Soaringman Funster

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    Very proud of my dad, still alive but in hospital after a stroke.
    A mere trooper in the East Yorkshire Yeomanry, he landed on D day in a sherman tank. The tank was hit by a panzer on D day + 3 and he was lucky to get out, his friend from Derby, Charlie Harper died instantly. Dad was OK and carried on to the battle for Caen, then to cross the rhine and on to Berlin.
    Still unasuming and modest, even in his working life in Cheltenham.
    As a trooper he will never make the Daily Telegraph, although I am sure he has many tales not told. Still my hero:thumb:
    Martin
     
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  6. Hollyberry

    Hollyberry Funster

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    I'm also a gravestone reader. Started when I studied history at college and we did a local graveyard survey.
    There is a UK website that covers cemeteries. I'll try to find it and post it later. I know the military cemetery at Tidworth in Wiltshire is on it and has many of the graves listed.

    I live in a very rural area of France and couple of years ago walked around the (immaculate) cemetery in a nearby village. I was surprised at how young the majority of people were at death--- 30s-early 50s. Just wonder what the cause/s would be in rural France in late 19th and 20th centuries.
     
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  7. icantremember

    icantremember Funster

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    Fascinating stories of bravery, innovation and intrigue Paul which make me feel very proud of these men but also for the many men & women that do not get mentioned.

    Generally the methods of war have since changed completely but I'm sure there are still many such acts of heroism in the recent and current conflicts.

    On a lighter note though, I also like to read the morning obituary columns and if my name is not there I know it's ok to get up for another day.:Wink:
     
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  8. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

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    There are some non-American but they are all "famous" people.

    Most recordings of gravestones (known as Memorial Inscriptions or MIs) have been undertaken by family or local history societies. Some are available on-line but most only in print, on fiche or on CD.

    There are also a few web sites created by individuals - e.g. Here for Gloucestershire - but they tend, naturally, to be selections based on the individuals' own research interests.
     
  9. ShiftZZ

    ShiftZZ Funster Life Member

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    Brave or stupid?

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. icantremember

    icantremember Funster

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    Well....he obviously didn't wilt like the flowers have:RollEyes:
     
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  11. sue1959

    sue1959 Read Only Funster

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    Wonder how many wives he had? Also how old was the youngest/eldest.
     
  12. ShiftZZ

    ShiftZZ Funster Life Member

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    William ap Howell ap David ap Iorwerth aged 105.
    He had been thrice married; his 1st wife was Elen ferch William;by her had 22 children; the 2nd wife was Katherine ferch Richard; by her had 10 children; the 3rd wife was Ellin verch William now living; by her he had 4 children. He had also 2 concubines; the 1st was Jonet ferch William;by her he had 2 children, and the other was Lecky Lloyd and by her he had 5 children
    His eldest son was Hriffith ap William now living aged 84. He has Childrens children to the 4th generation in abundance; his youngest son is also called Griffith ap William aged 2 and a 1/2 years now living in the said parish & the difference between the 2 brothers age is 81 years and 1/2; for the eldest was ofthat age when the youngest was born; his eldest daughter is called Alice verch William aged 72; she been twice maaryd and hath numerous offspring. There is living now of the said old man's offspring in the said parish 80 persons and at his funeral there were computed to be about 300 persons that descended from him
    The said old man was of middle stature, of good complexion, never troubled with cholock, gout or stone, seldom sick, of moderate diet, lived by Tillage, excercised himself much in fishing & fowling, and had his senses perfect to the last.
     
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  13. Gooney

    Gooney Funster

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    I visited the war graves in Arnhem a few years back, an incredible place surrounded by tall trees, there was not a sound to be heard not even the twitter of birds. I was drawn toward a particular British grave that showed the person died Sept 1944 on the exact date of my birth, the grave, like all there was immaculately tended but on the grave was a fresh bunch of roses signed by 'his fiance' incredible after all that time.
     
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  14. trophychap

    trophychap Funster

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    ROFL - think you mean 'how many (wives) did he wear out?'

    But seriously - how many of the 43 survived childhood?

    And even more seriously, a few years back (like about 4!) I was looking for another job. Not a lot of things I can actually do, I had a specialised career and having had a nervous breakdown doing it - it sort of put me off doing more of the same so I was looking for something different. Shedloads of 'lay' jobs in the NHS so I applied for quite a lot of them I thought I might be able to get. One of these was for a 2 year data entry project locally. To record actual reasons/circumstances of neo-natal deaths, which - where the circs hadn't been adequately recorded and apparently there are quite a few of them - could involve actually trying to contact and speak to the families. But it would also involve a significant amount of delving - say the poor mother had had subsequent births and they had eventually discovered she had an undelying condition which may have caused this? - or indeed the father. Needed someone with compassion who was mature enough to handle it, plus data entry and investigative skills. And of course be sufficiently intelligent to a) understand medical terminology (with training!) and get their head round the words, b) read doctors handwriting (!) c) learn medical abbreviations.

    Why were they doing this? Because the UK was the only country in N Europe where infant mortality rates had not fallen since the early 1950's.

    I found that terribly shocking.

    But back to the OP, sounds gory; it isn't! - Pete and I both enjoy (?) reading gravestones! There's many a time where we've taken ourselves round churchyards here or cemeteries in France doing exactly that. In France the mausoleums and graves are often much more flamboyant - if that's the right word. Gosh, that family must have been well-heeled/important, or what a shame etc. And the occasional military grave in an ordinary one as opposed to military cemeteries themselves which are a somewhat different ballgame, esp where the inscriptions are not just the 'standard' variety; and of course the shockingly young ages. Have only been round one American one which did not show the ages, which surprised me and I found I didn't quite get the same feelings towards the actual souls who had been laid to rest there. Seemed more 'sterile' somehow. Does that make sense to anyone else?


    Jenny
     
  15. jhorsf

    jhorsf Read Only Funster

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    Talking about old soldiers I always find a lump in my throat when I see someone's war medals for sale,it makes me think of the horrors they have been through and wonder how anyone's family could ever part with them.
    sorry to hijack your post Paul I know its off subject:Blush:
     
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  16. rangitira

    rangitira Funster

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    Somewhere in Yorkshire there is a Graveyard that contains quite a few graves of ANZACs who were brought to England from Gallipolli, obviously seriously wounded, then died.

    Every year on ANZAC DAY (April 25th) the children at local school "adopt them" and place bunches of flowers on the graves.

    I have only just learnt about this, so don't know if it is still happening, if it is I would like to thank the kids, not this year, maybe next, and also visit to pay my respects to the Diggers buried there.

    Any one from that part of the World know anything about it?
     
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  17. wasp

    wasp Funster

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    I read the obits every week and check the photos just to make sure I`m not in there cos no bugger tells me nowt in our house:Rofl1::Rofl1::Rofl1::Rofl1::Rofl1::Rofl1::Rofl1:
     
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  18. sue1959

    sue1959 Read Only Funster

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    It took me a long while to get used to hearing the death notices on the radio every morning here. It must be quite unnerving to hear all the names of your school mates etc and then realise you're the only one left.
     

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