motorhome payloads

Discussion in 'The Beginner' started by Fishman, Oct 13, 2011.

  1. Fishman

    Fishman Funster

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    Hi can anyone help i'm trying to make sense of the plate on the skirt of my
    hymer 524. top line reads 3900 kg second line reads 5500 kg third line reads 1-1850 kg fourth line reads 2-2200 kg i'm trying to find what the unladen weight is and what extra weight im permitted
     
  2. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    the only sure way to determine unladen weight is to empty the van completely, no food, cloths, passengers etc, absolutely anything that aint screwed down, and go to a weighbridge and have the front axle and rear axle weighed then the whole van.

    deduct the whole vans weight from the 3900kg max weight will give you your payload.

    on your plate the first line is the vehicles total laden weight 3900kg

    the second line is the total weight of laden van plus a loaded 1600kg trailer 5500kg

    the third is the front axle max laden weight 1850kg

    the forth is the rear axles max laden weight 2200kg

    the unladen weight will not be on the plate usually.
     
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  3. motor roamin

    motor roamin Funster

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    I am guessing here (a picture of the plate may help)

    I think that 3900kg is GVW (gross vehicle weight)

    1850kg maximum front axle weight
    2200kg maximum rear axle weight

    5500kg GTW (gross train weight) includes any trailer

    If I am coorect you should have another weight lower than the GVW if you take that weight away from the GVW that will give your payload.

    Hope this helps

    All the best Rick
     
  4. Fishman

    Fishman Funster

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    payload solved

    Big thanks to Pappa John & Motor Roamin for your quick response makes sense now. 'brain dont hurt as much' Fishman
     
  5. johnp10

    johnp10 Funster

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    Unladen weight is a statement by the manufacturer.
    It does appear on plates.
    It cannot be determined by stripping a vehicle down to basics.
    Even the Police / Vosa / whatever cant do it.
    Unladen Weight is the weight of a vehicle as it rolls of the assembly line, devoid of any load, tools, spare wheel, oils greases or other fluids.

    To completely empty and then weigh a vehicle will give the tare weight, which deducted from the MGW (which appears to be 3900 kgs) will give the payload.

    To determine what payload I have to play with, I fill up with fuel, water, tools and gas, then weigh the bus, weighing as John says, Gross weight and both axles.
    Then ensure you dont exceed the axle weights as per the advice given.

    Be aware, though, that the total weight of the axles added together will be greater than the MGW of the vehicle.
    This is to allow uneven loading.
    Dont overload either and axle or the gross.
    I's expensive.
     
  6. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    agreed John, but regardless of correct terminology the principle is the same.

    remove anything not nailed down, cloths, food, bedding, crockery and cutlery etc, then weigh the van.

    the difference between the two weights, 'empty' weight and plated gross weight, will be the payload.

    what no one has mentioned is its more important to know your actual running weight than the payload allowance.

    load the van as you intend using it including fuel, passengers, water and gas etc then visit a weighbridge....as long as you don't go over the gross or individual axle limits then you're OK to roll.


    a point about axle weights....as John said the combined axle limits will exceed the gross weight to allow uneven loading.

    if you run the rear axle at the max 2200kg then the front axle must be no more than 1700kg (even though the plate says 1850kg) and vice-versa or anywhere in between.

    2200kg plus 1700kg = 3900kg.

     
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