LEDs getting hot..?

Discussion in 'Tech/Mech General' started by Smith and Sharp, Apr 19, 2016.

  1. Smith and Sharp

    Smith and Sharp Funster

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    Just noticed that my G4 replacements are hot in my downlighting spots, am I right in thinking that they should burn cool...?

    These are what I've used....
    image.png
     
  2. DavidG58

    DavidG58 Funster

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    the details don't quote the wattage, presuming they are 5W ish there will still be some heat, but I would not have thought they would be hot, certainly nowhere near as hot as the halogens they replaced
     
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  3. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    The bulbs tend to be specced at 12V. Mine all got hot and failed early due to being on hookup quite a bit. The charger voltage quite often hit 14.5V.

    I put a voltage regulator on my lighting circuit to stabilise the voltage at 12v and I don't see the overheating problem anymore and the LED's last a much longer time.
     
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  4. Smith and Sharp

    Smith and Sharp Funster

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    I think they are 1.5 or 3w?
     
  5. DavidG58

    DavidG58 Funster

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    should be even cooler then

    worth looking at the spec, some have specific input voltage, as Gromett had suggested this could be an issue, you can get some that work within a wider range say 10 - 36V DC something like that

    they could just be a bad batch though, or not a good make

    the first batch I bought caused me all sorts of issues with fuses, one bulb even smoked when fitted, new ones from a new supplier all fine (y)
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016
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  6. Badknee

    Badknee Funster

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    After taking advice re 12v LED's being a bit iffy I went for these. Warm in the lounge area and cool in the kitchen and bathroom and they have been great.

    image.jpeg image.jpeg
     
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  7. DavidG58

    DavidG58 Funster

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    or 8 - 30V DC for instance (y)(y)
     
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  8. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    buy cheap you get cheap..

    as already said.. you need LEDs that are voltage regulated from 10 - 30v as sold by Aten lighting

    Regulated from 10-30V
    Diameter - 30mm
    Approximate light output - 160lm
    1.6W power consumption
    Not polarity Sensitive
    1 year guarantee
     
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  9. Masman

    Masman Funster

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    I had same problems.Bought of eBay.Mine got so hot they started smoking.so hot it took the skin off fingers just touching.Stripped them all out.Bought from Aten lighting two year's ago.no problems all cool.The old saying you pay for what you get.Some on here have bought from eBay with no problems.
     
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  10. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    There are 3 ways to go about this.
    1) Buy unregulated LED's dirt cheap and connect them to your (unregulated) battery directly. Live with heat problems and much shorter lifespan.
    2) Buy regulated LED's, These come with a regulator/voltage converter built in. These are a bit pricier but will run the LED's at a precise voltage optimised for lifespan.
    3) Buy a regulator and connect it to the supply for all Lights, then use cheap unregulated LEDS.

    The 1st option is cheap up front but will cost you in the long run.

    The 2nd option is best if you can't install a fixed regulator. However it will cost you a little more up front and has medium term cost impacts.

    The 3rd option is best if you can install a fixed regulator. It costs quite a bit up front but your long term costs are reduced.

    If you are a fulltimer or spend a lot of time in the van then the 3rd option is best. If you are just a summer user for weekends and the odd week then option 2 will probably be best.

    I have been through all three options and the final one was the best one for me as a fulltimer. The individual regulated LED's did last a lot longer than the cheap ones but they still went dim (in groups of 3) after 3-6 months of non stop use...

    I was going to give the link to the regulator I bought but the companies website is currently down for a rejig.
     
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