Led lights a word of caution

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Masman, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. Masman

    Masman Funster

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    Hi Funsters.Having fitted Led lights to motorhome a couple of months ago I had a couple of failures which were replaced with no problems by supplier from EBAY.Went away at w,end and noticed a smell in van,smelled a bit like disinfectant.after investigating discovered a LED was the culprit.it had got very hot and was starting to melt.so I checked all lights and found another three were in the same situation.I have nowchanged back to original Halogen.I know lots of funsters have changed to leds .Maybe I had a bad batch but I always thought leds were supposed to be cooler than halogen.Just to be on safe side I would ask you all to check yours in case of fire risk.:thumb:
     
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  2. DavidG58

    DavidG58 Funster

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    Good advice thanks, I bought some cheap LED bulbs some years ago, that were no good due to lack of light. But was amazed at the huge variation in price once I started looking for better

    I guess there might be a quality issue here, not sure whether you bought cheap or not, or for that matter what is cheap?

    We probably pay way over the odds now, but found a firm called Homewatt, great advice great product knowledge and they have backed up any issues, we have had 2 premature failures which they replaced

    David
     
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  3. icantremember

    icantremember Funster

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    One thing that doesn't seem to get attention when changing to led from halogen lamps is the fuse rating.

    Surely if reducing the current draw by using less power hungry lamps then the fuse rating should be reduced accordingly.

    Maybe I am being over cautious but perhaps some of our electrical wizards on here could advise.
     
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  4. JeanLuc

    JeanLuc Funster

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    One of the reasons for the difference in prices is whether or not the LED unit has voltage stabilisation built in. If you buy cheap ones without stabilisation, the natural variation in a motorhome's 12V system (anything between 14.8V and 10.5V) can cause them to fail.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2014
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  5. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    No.. Not required..

    fuses are matched to the current rating of the cable, not to the load.
     
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  6. Stacetop

    Stacetop Funster

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    We have had no problems with yours although they did cost around £5per bulb but each one has its own built in fuse.
     
  7. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    some of ours are now 5 or 6 years old.
    Some came from the usual lads who do the shows, and some brought in from China via http://www.banggood.com

    Had one failure so far ( and we are in the van an average of 7 months of the year ) and that one was from the show supplier ( who did change it without query or issue )

    There is a very good reason people sell stuff on eBay. It is often pee poor.

    Whilst there are many good sellers on there ( and Amazon ) it is always worth considering the fact that decent kit will sell its self.. Iffy stuff, sold very cheaply, is sold cheaply for a good reason !!

    As for fuses.. Yes, reduced mine.. Fuses may well relate to cabling TO THE DELIVERY POINT, but the unit being fused varies .. Otherwise there would be no point in putting different fuses in plug tops depending on what is being used ( as in maybe a 3 amp in a telly and a 13 amp in a 3kw kettle )
     
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  8. tonyidle

    tonyidle Funster

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    There are various opinions. I am firmly on the side of having a fuse no larger than is needed to protect (as far as possible) from exactly what you have experienced.. A fuse protecting the cable is far too large to offer any protection from circuit faults within the light unit.
     
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  9. TheBig1

    TheBig1 Funster Life Member

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    sounds like you cooked them with over voltage well above the 12v they are designed to work on. if you were on hook up this could be over 14 volts due to the charger. in this case you need to fit a voltage stabiliser to the light supply wire
     
  10. scotjimland

    scotjimland Funster Life Member

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    No harm in reducing , but as said not required..

    On 230v systems..
    The fuse in a plug top is matched to the flexible cable rating .. not the appliance wattage ..

    in your examples, the tv cable will be 0.5mm or 0.75mm so it has a 3 or 6 amp fuse.. a kettle flex will be 1.0mm or 1.5mm cable so will have a 10A or 13A fuse..

    Wattage. Current. Cable size .
    720 (3A) 0.5mm2 Table lamps, food mixers, certain hair dryers. Note: length must not exceed 2m
    1440 (6A) 0.75mm2 Refrigerators, vacuum cleaners, electric drills, irons, high power hair dryers, televisions
    2400 (10A) 1.0mm2 New kettles, 2kW fan heaters
    3240 ( 13.5A) 1.25mm2 3kW fires, older kettles
    3840 (16A) 1.5mm2 Storage heaters, immersion heater.
     
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  11. jonandshell

    jonandshell Funster

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    A single LED going pop in your light fitting will create a lot less heat and therefore fire risk than a single fully functioning halogen bulb!

    The quality of the light fitting is the key here. Electrical standards dictate that plastics used must be able to endure high temperatures with themselves igniting.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2014
  12. davidallan

    davidallan Funster

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    ...and moving a liile bit onto Home LEDs---

    Over some 6+ years we have had NO failures [12v types for the M/Home]:Smile::Smile: These were bought mainly from FleeBay & mixed suppliers as the prices came down:RollEyes:

    AS FOR replacement home 'Ceiling lights' / down lighters : NO SUCH LUCK--[mains voltage] :cry:

    Bought a pack of 10 .....3 FAILURES in as many weeks. Smell + Smoke+ Flickering . and ALL ended up with 1 or 2 of the Segments which are now BLACK .:Eeek:


    ******WE ARE VERY PLEASED THAT WE DID ORDER THE ONES WHICH ARE "ENCAPSULATED IN GLASS ".......SOME OTHERS ARE OF THE 'OPEN TYPES'......FIRE COMES TO MIND and this could cause very serious outcomes :cry:*****
    Hope this helps:thumb:
     
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  13. Trikeman

    Trikeman Read Only Funster

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    Is there a particular 'type/sort' of LED that fails the most, or more importantly gets hot/fire?:Eek!: I don't really mean manufacturer/supplier.

    I have had LED's for a while with no problems, however I'm interested to see which ones are failing/smelling/catching fire etc, spotlamps, downlighters, strips or multi-spots.

    Regards,

    Trikeman. :Wink:
     
  14. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    If you can see the back of the unit, it will have something more on it than a resistor or two.
    The best ones actually have a surface mount control chip on them, but most of ours have a surface mount transistor and a couple of discretes ( a resistor to bias the emitter, another to control the base voltage of the tranny and a capacitor to take out any stray RF or AC component on the feed voltage )
     
  15. Ed Excel

    Ed Excel Funster

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  16. davidallan

    davidallan Funster

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    ...Further info

    Hi Trikeman....These 10 units were GU10/MR16 48smd 5 Watt bulbs....actually from one of the biggest suppliers on Fleebay...some 130,000 sales !!

    Obviously I shall inform the supplier since I regard these 'Failures' as being of a serious nature SO that they are aware...I am sure also that I am not likely to be the only Purchaser to have such incidents :Eeek:
     
  17. Scattycat

    Scattycat Funster

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    We had a problem with some cheap LED lights off the net a couple of years ago.

    They we're put together using hot melt glue which melted and the things fell apart as soon as they warmed up.

    I took them down and cleaned all the wax off and reseated them using super glue and they've been fine ever since
     
  18. wasp

    wasp Funster

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    I just bought two 4 meter strips to replace 6 Flourescents on top of the cupboards you got me thinking now !!:Eeek::Eeek::Eeek::Eeek:
     
  19. jetjem

    jetjem Funster

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    Switching from Halogens to LED

    Hello,
    I wondered if someone can send me in the right direction.
    Just collected our 2007 Hymer C644 and wanting to make some changes to the interior lights.
    I thought this was just a simple switch of compatible LED bulbs to replace the halogens, but reading further I see LEDs need to used with a LED driver?

    Has anyone done the switch over on a Hymer C644 and if they have let me know how they did it.
    Thanks,
    Eddie
     
  20. DeuceBG

    DeuceBG Funster

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    I've replaced all of my halogen bulbs with LEDs in the habitation area and they are fine but they were not cheap :Eeek:...Now I've replaced the interior bulb in the cab with a £1-89 one and it doesn't work :Angry:.
    I guess sometimes you just get what you pay for eh!!
     
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