In case of emergency (ICE)

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Don Quixote, Jan 23, 2016.

  1. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Funster

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    Adding an ICE ("In Case of Emergency") contact to your phone can help emergency personnel can locate a friend or family member who can speak on your behalf if you become unconscious or incapacitated. This simple idea was developed by a British paramedic, Bob Brotchie, who recognized the need for speed when emergency personnel need to get information about a patient or contact next of kin. For people with pre-existing medical conditions and allergies, in particular, keeping your emergency contact information close at hand could help save your life!

    Phone security

    (Source Wikipedia) For security purposes, many mobile phone owners now lock their mobiles, requiring a passcode to be entered in order to access the device. This hinders the ability of first responders to access the ICE phone list entry. In response to this problem, many device manufacturers have provided a mechanism to specify some text to be displayed while the mobile is in the locked state. The owner of the phone can specify their "In Case of Emergency" contact and also a "Lost and Found" contact. For example, BlackBerry mobiles permit the "Owner" information to be set in the Settings → Options → Owner menu item. There has been a study that there is NO NEED to lock your phone ever. Alternatively, some handsets provide access to a list of ICE contacts directly from the "locked" screen.

    Adding ICE to Your Cell Phone

    Think about who your emergency contact should be. You should choose emergency contacts who know about any allergies or medical conditions that you may have, and who know how to contact your family. You should also notify anyone that you designate as an emergency contact that you have done so, and make sure they are clear on what information they might need to share to help you in an emergency.


    Add an ICE contact to your address book.

    Open the address book or contacts section on your cell phone and create a new entry with the name ICE. Then add the contact information for your chosen emergency contact. It is also a good idea to enter additional information about the contact, including his or her name and relationship to you under "Notes" or in another unused field.
    • Some people add a dash or a space after the word "ICE" followed by the person's first name, so that emergency personnel know who they are calling. For instance, you might call the entry "ICE – Sarah" or "ICE – Mr. Smith." or using 01 ICE - Sarah will put the name at the very top of your phone book.
    Add an ICE app to a password protected phone.

    I
    f your phone is password protected and you are incapacitated, an ICE contact won't do any good. Fortunately there are now apps available for Android, Windows, and iPhones that can add emergency contact information to your lock screen.
    • Search for "ICE" or "ICE lock screen" in your appropriate app store to find one that works on your phone.
    • Install the app and input the relevant information. An emergency responder can then pick up your phone and access your emergency contact information, even if you are unable to supply the password. I would consider if you really need to password protect your phone. (that's up to you)
    Add an ICE sticker to the back of your phone.

    ICE stickers with blanks for contact names and numbers are a great way to clearly label your phone, bike helmet, or laptop with important emergency contact information. These stickers can be found at many pharmacies and doctor's offices, or purchased online.

    Be sure to complete the contact information clearly, preferably using waterproof ink


    Don't forget to replace and update the sticker as needed to keep the information current.

    Create your own ICE label for the back of your phone.


    Y
    ou can create an ICE label using computer label paper or decal paper available at any office supply store, or even using waterproof tape and a permanent marker. Creating your own label will allow you to add as much information as you would like about allergies and medications.

    Remember to replace your label if the text becomes worn off or illegible.

    Getting an ICE Card for Your Wallet or Purse

    These are often available for free at doctor's offices, hospitals and pharmacies, but you can also download a free emergency contact or ICE card blank. These are available on many different websites,
    (LINK Below) There are even ICE cards that can be completed using online forms so you don't have to worry about less-than-perfect handwriting.

    LINK: http://geticecard.com/

    Include important health information on your ICE card.

    If you have allergies, prescriptions, or medical conditions, include that information on the card along with your blood type and emergency contact information.

    Carrying an ICE card is important, even if you wear medic alert jewelry, in case your medic alert is missing or damaged at the time of an emergency

    • You should also consider keeping a copy in the glove compartment of your car or motorhome
    • Runners, walkers and others who exercise outdoors can get identity tags to affix to their running /walking shoes. These can be found at most sporting goods stores, or online by searching for "shoe ID" or "shoe tag."
    Create ICE cards for all of your family members and encourage them to use them.

    You can place an ICE card inside your child's backpack or school bag. Be sure to add one to Grandma's purse or Granddads wallet, as well


    Many parents also add emergency contact stickers to children's car seats. You can create your own custom labels, or order them online ( do a google search )

    The thing about owning a motorhome is you can be miles/kms away from your known friends and family or in another country where you don't speak the "lingo", but a simple ICE card or details on the back of your phone WILL HELP.

    The information above is not essential, but anything that helps you in an emergency has good to be good.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2016
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  2. trophychap

    trophychap Funster

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    Sound advice and something we both have done with our mobiles, but I have never heard of a paramedic that would be prepared to go rifling through a persons pockets at the scene of an accident just in case they were accused of stealing something off your person!
     
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  3. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Funster

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    I used to teach first aid to the police and one of the things they do is check for information like ICE cards or mobile phones, so it does happen. Depends where and when if a paramedic will do this, but I would think it could happen.
     
  4. John & Joan

    John & Joan Funster

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    N332 Police site in Spain recommended that you prefix with AA or Aa your chosen contact. They only have to look at the first contact if they need to contact someone. AA (contact name) will come as first contact.
     
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  5. Badknee

    Badknee Funster

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    Yes they will and check those bracelets and necklaces with important medical information. When I attended the 'First Biker On The Scene' course we were told to gather as much information as we could to pass on to the professionals when they arrived. Police will deffo do it in case of a fatal accident.
     
  6. Don Quixote

    Don Quixote Funster

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    As does 01, or 1.
     
  7. wingman

    wingman Funster

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    Anyone who has an iPhone with a 'Health App' on it (White square with a red heart icon) can do this FOC.

    Tap on the icon to open up the app', then fill in your details - Medical condition, Meds, Allergies, Contact numbers etc. Even put a photo and add you weight/height if you wish.

    Then......
    When you slide to unlock your screen, bottom left of your passcode screen is the word 'Emergency'. Tap on emergency, and at bottom left in red, are the words Medical I/D. Tap that and up will come all of the medical details and contacts that you have decided to reveal. No need to enter the code.

    Hospitals and emergency workers are normally aware of this. Now Funster First Responders :D are also aware!

    PS. In a former working life, if there was no Medic Alert bracelet or necklace, I frequently went down unconscious casualties' pockets, but always did it with police or hospital authorities in attendance who would witness it. Mind you; in those days, folk knew that you wouldn't rob them - just help them!
    Always pat someone's pockets first in case they have sharps in their pocket!
     
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  8. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    My phone is screen locked but i found an app which is on the lock screen.
    All it does is set a second lock over the phones original.
    Click the icon and it opens the app.....which then charges to retrieve info.
    Actually, you pay to enter the info.
    Uninstalled and now use the phones lock signature text (a personal message shown on the locked screen) to display I.C.E. and two contact numbers....home and shirls mobile.

    The lock sig is usually along the lines.....tough, its locked, you thieving bastard.
     
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  9. gus-lopez

    gus-lopez Funster

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    I used to use the I.C.E years ago but don't bother now i live here.
     
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