Habitation check

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Kanberlingo, Nov 18, 2009.

  1. Kanberlingo

    Kanberlingo Read Only Funster

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    My MH is due a hab/damp check, with prices varying from £145, to £322.26 inc vat. (very precise that figure) with one at £160 in the middle. The £160 quote told me what work would be carried out & a print-off of the work done, is supplied.

    I'm ashamed to say that of all the MHs that we've owned, I've never had a hab/damp check carried out on any of them. But in my defence, this MH is only 2yrs old (I'm the second owner) whereas the others were "oldish" MHs, the youngest being a 2003 when we had it, & we only seemed to keep them for app. 2/3 years. I'll pre-empt one obvious reply that I would expect & that is that the older ones would have been a priority annual inspection, but we never had any problems with them & at the time of exchange, a dealer damp check was a statutory requirement, so I guess we were lucky.
    So how do the charges above stack up with those in the know?

    Cheers

    BeeJay
     
  2. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    Try this website www.mcea.co.uk they have a team of approved engineers that come out to you .Prices quoted around £100. I am having mine done in January , and if it wasn't still under warranty I wouldn't bother . Biggest rip off since the first motorhome sold .:thumb:
     
  3. Brisey

    Brisey Funster Life Member

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  4. Johns_Cross_Motorhomes

    Johns_Cross_Motorhomes Trader - Motorhome & Accessory Sales

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    I second that, but not sure if Mark does Lancashire.

    Peter
     
  5. madbluemad

    madbluemad

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    Hi, More to the point is Why Bother ?

    Jim
    :Smile:
     
  6. welsh winger

    welsh winger Read Only Funster

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    I asked this question myself, back in the summer I took my van back to the dealer as the fridge was playing up, he sent me to a place for the repairs, speaking to the owner I decided to let him give the van the once over, they found 3 gas leaks, the rubber pipe from the bottles was 5 years old and badly cracked.

    I am now a convert and will get mine checked each year.

    Nick
     
  7. vindiboy

    vindiboy Funster

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    I have only had one Habitation check done on my van and that was in it's second year, I had it done by Hymer UK at the Stratford show, what a farce that was , it cost £ 160 pounds [ I did not pay that as I had a get out of jail card free from them ] they did not check any mains fittings as I had no hook up and they didn't have a Jenny with them, the rest of the check was a farce, nothing I could not have done myself, The only part that was of any use as far as I could see was the damp check ,and I have since bought a meter and do my own checks, If any thing in my van fails I now just get it fixed ,like the boiler had a problem recently, electric collar failed so I had it replaced, you may say that I won't get as much for my van if I sell it without the Habitation check papers, but that doesn't worry me as I have saved a lot of money by not having it habitated and am compitent enough to keep it up together myself, any way if the resale price was affected I could always bite the bullet and get a Hab check done on sale, at least that would show the true condition of things at time of sale.:thumb::thumb::thumb:
     
  8. madbluemad

    madbluemad

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    I had a hab check last year and it was so obvious that it hadn't been checked that I swore I'd never have it done again. Maybe it was a poor garage, however I did have an awful lot of other work carried out by him and he did an excellent job.


    I will agree that a gas service is required and something that I will have done this or next year.

    Cheers

    Jim:
    Smile:
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2009
  9. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    I am now a convert and will get mine checked each year.

    Nick[/QUOTE]

    How long do you think it would take to do a gas pressure test .They quote you well over £100 to do a Hab/Check , most of the certificates are printed off in house , and it is just a tick list .If it wasn't for the warranty I wouldn't bother .Oh and to bring things into perspective I had an MOT done on my last van it cost £45.
     
  10. madbluemad

    madbluemad

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    How long do you think it would take to do a gas pressure test .[/QUOTE]

    I woudnt now how to do a gas test other than to buy a meter that senses gas. I think there's probabley more to it than that, (not a lot more mind).

    I'd feel a bit more comfortable knowing that the van wasn't going to bow up at any time.

    Jim
    :Smile:
     
  11. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    I woudnt now how to do a gas test other than to buy a meter that senses gas. I think there's probabley more to it than that, (not a lot more mind).

    I'd feel a bit more comfortable knowing that the van wasn't going to bow up at any time.

    Jim
    :Smile:[/QUOTE]

    I agree with what you are saying , especially on the gas side ,but it's the cost that concerns me also the so called engineers they use for carrying out such checks , many are not gas safe registered . :thumb:
     
  12. Kanberlingo

    Kanberlingo Read Only Funster

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    A fair number of pros & cons on this subject. The vehicle side for service isn't a problem as I do all that myself & always have done, that way I know it's right.

    Thanks for the links, I'll see what info comes up, although I can't see Mark at C.L.S. getting involved. The £160 quote I've had, plus the reputation of this particular dealers workshop, puts them at the front if I decide to get it done.

    BeeJay
     
  13. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

     
  14. DESCO

    DESCO Read Only Funster

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    I have always been a firm believer in having Hab Checks done, to my mind it's a small price to pay for piece of mind.

    If you pick a reliable company they will do a good job for you and test everything. I have watched the company I use do the job and seen the trouble they go to, and feel happy that if any thing is wrong they will find it.

    After all it is your life and you only get one go at it, so I am quite happy to pay the cost.



    Dave:thumb::thumb:
     
  15. lebesset

    lebesset Read Only Funster

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    as far as I can ascertain this habitation check is a uk con ; doesn't seem to exist elsewhere , or does it?
    and if you buy a new vehicle this must be warranted as fit for purpose , so how can this be taken away from you ?

    perhaps , not living in the uk , I am missing something here ...if it was a free check , ok ; but pay real money [ ok , not real money anymore , £'s ] ???

    how have I managed without this for 35 years ?
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2009
  16. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    After all it is your life and you only get one go at it, so I am quite happy to pay the cost.



    Dave:thumb::thumb:[/QUOTE]

    I own my own house which I use a lot more than my Motorhome , and I wouldn't dream of spending £150 - £200 for someone to come and do a habitation check for me every year and if I did I would want proper certificates from a registered engineer . Once my warranty is out . I shall get a gas safe engineer to test all the gas side of things and I shall do the rest .:thumb:
     
  17. madbluemad

    madbluemad

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    I own my own house which I use a lot more than my Motorhome , and I wouldn't dream of spending £150 - £200 for someone to come and do a habitation check for me every year and if I did I would want proper certificates from a registered engineer . Once my warranty is out . I shall get a gas safe engineer to test all the gas side of things and I shall do the rest .:thumb:[/QUOTE]

    You coudnt come and sought out the dash back light for me could you stagman :Rofl1:
    About Me: Electrical Engineer

    There is a fulll hab service check list on the site here somewhere and I reckon anybody could do it.

    On top of all that when using your van on a regular basis you are effectivley checking and inspecting your own van. You probabley know more about its condition than anybody.

    Jim
    :Smile:
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2009
  18. stagman

    stagman Deleted User

    [You coudnt come and sought out the dash back light for me could you stagman :Rofl1:
    About Me: Electrical Engineer

    Jim
    :Smile:[/QUOTE]
    Pleasure call in when your passing next .:thumb:
     
  19. madbluemad

    madbluemad

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    See this post originally posted by Don Madge

    Recommended Annual Habitation Service Check

    INTRODUCTION

    There is much confusion over the annual habitation service or check for motorhomes, with widely varying prices and standards of work. However a 'standard checklist' is used by many dealers when carrying out this work, but it seems that many owners are not aware of this, or of what checks should be included. We suggest that owners should ask for the 'SMMT Annual Habitation Service Check' to be carried out. Competent owners may wish to use the published checklist when carrying out their own maintenance.

    The following guidelines for the checking and servicing of a motorhome's habitation area are taken from the guidance booklet published by the Motorhome Section of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) and the Motorhome Division of The National Caravan Council (NCC). They are © SMMT & NCC and reproduced here with their kind permission. We would like to thank them for providing this information and also thank The Motorhome Information Service for their assistance.

    The checks do not cover any part of the base vehicle, although there may be minor overlapping (such as tyre pressures, cab seats, internal lights, battery and windows) in a van conversion. The base vehicle must be serviced in accordance with the chassis manufacturer's instructions.

    Reference should also be made to:

    1. Any owner's manual or equivalent supplied with the vehicle by the motorhome manufacturer.

    2 Appliance manufacturers' leaflets.

    3. Driver s handbook or equivalent supplied by the chassis manufacturer.

    A vehicle is accepted for service at the dealer's discretion.
    Any defects, repairs, adjustments, cleaning or lubrication required will be noted on the check list.
    The customer's approval will be obtained before any work is done.

    Not all of the equipment mentioned in this manual is fitted as standard to every motorhome

    Any work carried out following the check, and the sufficiency of the work in the check itself, is subject to the contract between the customer and the dealer. The National Caravan Council (NCC) & SMMT and their member companies are not part of this contract, and accept no liability in contract, tort or otherwise, other than death or personal injury due to negligence on their part.


    SECTION 1
    BODY MOUNTING

    1.1 BODY TO CHASSIS
    Examine all fixings retaining the body to the chassis - this may be direct or through a sub-frame.
    Where practical, all fittings should be checked to ensure they are all present and correctly secured.

    1.2 BODY TO CAB
    Examine joint between body and cab for signs of movement and soundness of sealing media.

    1 .3 BODY RETENTION (Dismountables)
    Check serviceability and tightness of body retaining gear.
    Check serviceability of body support struts and mountings.
    (Note - whether it will be necessary to demount the body to check the
    body supports must be agreed between dealer and customer).

    SECTION 2
    WINDOWS

    2.1 WINDOWS
    Check window glazing rubber or sealing for cracks and general condition.
    Check for satisfactory opening and closing.
    Check fixing of top hinge rail on top hung windows.
    Check for good weather seal when window is closed and latched.
    Check catches and stays for satisfactory operation.

    SECTION 3
    DOORS

    3.1 EXTERNAL DOORS
    Not including base vehicle doors.

    3.1.1 SECURITY
    Check that hinges and catches are satisfactory and that, when latched, doors are held securely shut.
    Check that keys or internal latches lock the doors correctly.
    Check that any device fitted to hold a door in the open position is satisfactory.

    3.1.2 SEALING
    Check all door seals for cracking and general condition. Check correct closing to give a weather-tight seal.

    3.1.3 CHILDPROOF LOCK
    Where a door is fitted with a childproof lock, check that an appropriate warning notice is fixed adjacent to the door.
    Appropriate warning notices are available from motorhome manufacturers.

    3.2 INTERNAL DOORS

    3.2.1 SECURITY
    Check that hinges and catches are satisfactory and that, when latched, the door is held securely shut.

    3.2.2 SAFETY
    Check that any device fitted to hold a door in the closed position can be operated from both sides to open the door in an emergency.

    SECTION 4
    ATTACHMENTS TO CHASSIS OR UNDERBODY

    4.1 CORNER STEADIES
    Check that attachments to chassis are secure. Ensure steadies work freely and satisfactorily.
    Lubricate screw to ensure correct operation.

    4.2 FOLDING/RETRACTABLE STEPS
    Check that step pivots are satisfactory and not worn. Check that, when closed, the retaining mechanism holds the step securely. If fitted, check warning device is working.

    4.3 UNDERFLOOR WATER TANK MOUNTINGS
    Check mounting frames are secure to body. Any fastenings that require releasing to remove the tank should be free of rust and operate freely. (Removal, flushing, cleaning and replacing of tanks will be carried out at the prior request of the customer or will be done subsequently with other work).

    4.4 SPARE WHEEL
    Remove spare wheel. Check for damage. Check tyre pressure.
    Check mounting frame for security to body and for secure retention of
    spare wheel.

    4.5 WHEELBOXES
    Check for damage, corrosion, water seepage, signs of tyre rubbing.

    SECTION 5
    ATTACHMENT TO BODY EXTERIOR

    5 1 ROOF LIGHTS
    Check security, general condition, and that sealing has not deteriorated.

    5.2 ROOF RACKS AND LADDERS
    Check security to body and general condition.
    Check roof for damage adjacent to rack.

    5.3 MOULDINGS, TRIMS
    Check security. Check sealing has not deteriorated (see section 6).

    5.4 FLUE TERMINALS, AIR VENTS
    Check security. Check sealing has not deteriorated.
    Check that these are not blocked.

    SECTION 6
    INTERNAL

    6.1 BODY SEEPAGE CHECK
    Examine for moisture/water staining of areas under windows, at side of roof and at corners which could indicate water seepage problems.
    A moisture meter should be used where appropriate.

    6.2 FURNITURE
    Check furniture is securely fixed.
    Check door hinges, catches and stays for satisfactory operation.

    6.3 DINETTE SEAT/BEDS
    Check seat bases for security of fixings and for damage.
    Make up beds according to manufacturer's instructions and check for
    rigidity and safety.

    6.4 UPPER BUNKS
    Check there is a secure means of access to upper bunks and that, where applicable, protection against falling out and entrapment is provided.

    6.5 CURTAINS/BLINDS/NETS
    Check track is secure and curtains draw freely without snagging.
    Check blinds and/or nets for correct operation.
    Check flyscreens in roof lights and air vents.

    6.6 CAB SEATS
    Where cab seats form part of the living area and/or bed layout they should be checked for security of attachment, smooth and easy operation of seat slides, swivels and seat back operation.

    6.7 FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
    Check condition and expiry date. If an extinguisher is not fitted, inform the customer of the advisability of such equipment.

    6.8 FIRE BLANKET
    Check position (should be near cooker).
    If one is not present, inform the customer of the advisability of such equipment.

    6.9 ADVICE TO OCCUPIERS WARNING NOTICE
    Check presence and condition and advise accordingly
    The wording and the layout of the notice should be set out as follows:

    ADVICE TO USERS

    VENTILATION
    NO NOT OBSTRUCT THE VENTILATORS WHICH ARE FITTED; YOUR SAFETY DEPENDS ON THEM

    IN CASE OF FIRE
    1. GET EVERYONE OUT
    2. TURN OFF OUTSIDE GAS VALVE OR OIL VALVE (IF FITTED)
    3. DISCONNECT THE MAINS ELECTRICITY SUPPLY
    4. RAISE THE ALARM AND CALL THE FIRE BRIGADE
    5. TACKLE THE FIRE IF SAFE TO DO SO

    FIRE PRECAUTIONS

    CHILDREN: DO NOT LEAVE THEM ALONE

    MEANS OF ESCAPE: MAKE SURE YOU KNOW THE LOCATION AND OPERATION OF THE EMERGENCY EXITS, KEEP ALL ESCAPE ROUTES CLEAR

    COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS: KEEP THEM CLEAR OF ALL HEATING AND COOKING APPLIANCES

    FIRE FIGHTING: PROVIDE, AT LEAST, A 1 KG POWDER FIRE EXTINGUISHER, THAT COMPLIES WITH BS 5423 BY THE MAIN EXIT DOOR, AND A FIRE BLANKET NEXT TO THE COOKER. MAKE YOURSELF FAMILIAR WITH THE INSTRUCTIONS ON YOUR FIRE EXTINGUISHER AND THE FIRE PRECAUTION ARRANGEMENTS ON THE CARAVAN PARK.

    6.10 PORTABLE OR OPEN FLAME HEATING EQUIPMENT
    Check for its presence. The customer must be advised against its use.

    SECTION 7

    ELEVATING ROOFS

    7.1 LIFTING MECHANISM
    Gas struts or spring struts should be checked for corrosion (particularly on the piston rods of gas struts), smooth operation when operating roof up and down and to ensure that they support the roof when fully up. Check attachment points of struts to body and roof.

    7.2 CANVAS SIDE WALLS
    Check for satisfactory attachment to body and roof.
    Check for splits or holes, particularly at fold lines.
    Check that the canvas stows satisfactorily when roof is lowered.
    (A waterproofing check will be done at the prior request of the
    customer).

    7.3 SOLID SIDE WALL
    Check sides and end panels fold up and down correctly, that they seal against each other where appropriate and that retaining mechanisms are satisfactory.
    Check all hinges for security and freedom from strain.

    7.4 LOCKING OF ROOF
    It is important to ensure that when the roof is in the travelling position, it is safely and positively locked down. Any locking retaining mechanism should be carefully examined.

    SECTION 8
    GAS SYSTEMS

    8.1 CYLINDERS AND REGULATORS
    Establish that the cylinders and regulators are compatible. Butane (blue) cylinders should have a regulator stamped with the pressure 11" WG (28 m bar) and propane (red) cylinders should be stamped 14" WG (37 m bar). Check that the regulator is controlling the gas to the correct pressure for the type of cylinder fitted.
    Check cylinder compartment vents and gas drop hole in the floor are free from obstruction.
    Check seals on internal doors.

    8.2 HOSE AND PIPING
    Check any flexible hose is of an approved type. Check its condition and for any evidence of cracking.
    Check piping for condition, damage and correct support.
    Carry out an overall leak test.

    8.3 APPLIANCES
    In general, the checking of gas appliances can be divided into the following:

    1. Cleaning 4. Flues
    2. Operation of controls 5. Flame failure device
    3. Correct flame structure 6. Security

    8.3.1 CLEANING
    Where appropriate, remove cover(s) to gain access to heat exchanger.
    Clean away any fluff or foreign matter. Reassemble and test.
    Clean flame viewing window.

    8.3.2 CONTROLS
    Check that all knobs etc. work smoothly and are secure on their spindles.
    If gas taps require greasing to ease stiffness, use only approved LPG grease.
    Check that appliances can be brought into service using the normal controls.

    8.3.3 CORRECT FLAME STRUCTURE
    Check that all pilot flames burn quietly and clearly.

    Refrigerator: With the refrigerator gas control turned to maximum, the colour of the flame should be predominantly blue.
    Instantaneous Water Heating: The main burner flame should be of even height and blue in colour. A flame burning yellow will allow sooting to occur.

    Ovens: The oven flame should burn quietly and be of even height, mainly blue/green in colour. If the gas is propane, the flame will normally develop yellow tips as the burner heats up. If the gas is butane, a small amount of yellow tipping will be seen immediately after lighting, increasing as the burner heats up.

    Grill Burners: It is normal for the flames on this type of burner to develop yellow tips as it heats up, particularly on butane.

    General: A flame lifting away from the burners is an indication of too high a pressure, although it may happen with grill burners whilst the frets are heating up.
    A yellow flame will cause sooting and is an indication of too low a pressure.
    Providing the regulator and piping have been checked and found satisfactory the above faults should not appear.

    8.3.4 FLUES
    Flues should be examined for security of fixing and for correct attachment to appliances and flue terminals. They should be free from damage and corrosion.
    Check for leakage of flue gases into the vehicle.

    8.3.5 FLAME FAILURE DEVICE (FFD)
    Where fitted, the FFD should be checked to ensure satisfactory operation. After the appliance has been successfully checked, allow time for the thermocouple to cool.
    Attempt to relight the appliance by turning it on without pushing in the gas control knob. (Do not override the FFD). If appliance does not light, FFD is satisfactory.

    8.3.6 SECURITY
    Check appliance is securely fixed to the vehicle/furniture and will be free from rattles. Where applicable, check that water pipes are satisfactorily attached with no sign of leakage

    8.3.7 PROTECTION OF ADJACENT SURFACES
    Check that surfaces adjacent to open flame cooking appliances have adequate protection.

    8.3.8 INSPECTIONS
    It is recommended that inspections are carried out by a qualified fitter
    trained to, for example, CORGI (Confederation of Registered Gas Installers) or Calor standards.

    SECTION 9
    WATER SYSTEM
    Before operating the water system, a visual check of the following items may show up an obvious leak source.

    9.1 FRESH WATER TANK CONTAINER
    Check condition, fill tank and check for leaks.
    Check the external filter and filter pipe to tank.
    Check for satisfactory venting.
    Check condition and presence of filter cap.

    9.2 WASTE WATER TANK
    Check drain tap is clear and working.
    Check condition and presence of drain hose. (The water tank will be drained, flushed, cleaned and charged with a measure of toilet fluid/disinfectant at the prior request of the customer.

    9.3 FILTER PUMP
    When applicable, remove filter and replace.
    Check the in-line pump for security and condition. Remove the
    submersible pump from tank, check condition.
    Check pump inlet and outlet are clear and not obstructed.
    Check delivery hose and electric cable are secure and satisfactory

    Operate pump. Check all piping for leaks.
    Operate taps and shower. If a hot water system is fitted, it can be checked for leaks etc. using cold water.
    (Note - Aerated water from tap could be due to a leak on the suction side of the pump).

    With water running through the drain pipes, check for leaks and satisfactory draining of water from sinks etc.

    9.6 . COUPLINGS AND FLUIDS.
    Check that the appropriate markings are used - blue for fresh water, grey for waste water. Ensure a sealing off cover is supplied for each coupling. Check that filler positions are designated "petrol", "diesel", or "water" as appropriate.

    9.7 TOILET WASTE TANK
    Check that any fixed tank intended to receive discharge from a toilet is fitted with either a level or full indicator.

    SECTION 10
    ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

    10.1 EXTRA LOW VOLTAGE 12 VOLTS (excluding vehicle)

    10.1.1 BATTERY/IES
    Check battery/ies for condition.
    Check connections, wires, fuses and relays appertaining to the habitation electrics.

    10.1.2 WIRING
    Examine all visible wiring.
    Check all connections and joints are sound and satisfactory

    10.1.3 FUSES/FUSE HOLDERS
    Ensure that fuses and fuse holders used to protect the habitation electrics are satisfactory and that fuse ratings are compatible with the circuit appliances being protected.

    10.1.4 APPLIANCES
    Inspect all appliances for damage, signs of overheating and secure fixing
    Function test all appliances.

    10.2 MAINS 230 VOLT SYSTEM
    It is recommended that the inspection and certification of the 230 volt system be carried out by a qualified electrician who is an approved contractor of the NICEIC (National Inspection Council for Electrical Installation Contracting) or in membership of the Electrical Contractors Association.


    SECTION 11
    VENTILATION

    11.1 HIGH LEVEL
    Check all high level ventilators, including roof lights, are free from obstruction and allow a free flow of air.

    11.2 LOW LEVEL
    Check all low level ventilators are free from obstruction and allow a free flow of air.
    If the ventilator is manually adjustable then ensure mechanism is free and operating correctly
     
  20. vwalan

    vwalan Funster

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    as a matter of interest i have just spoken to gas safety tec ,dept. there is no qualification under there system that covers self propelled vehicles that are for private use . the gas satey legislation says compedent people to work on these vehicles. i dont say gas safe arent ,but there isnt a qualification that makes them any better than a compedant person.
     
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