Grey squirrel 'may have hitched'

Discussion in 'Nature & Wildlife' started by RockieRV, Apr 25, 2008.

  1. RockieRV

    RockieRV Deleted User

    The first grey squirrel to be officially reported in the Highlands may have arrived on the back of a lorry carrying hay or straw bales.

    The region is deemed to be a stronghold for native reds, free of the risk of competition for food and a disease carried by the American species.

    Full story here

    The disease, which can be carried by greys without harming them, was found on the Queensberry Estate near Dumfries.

    Routine monitoring of greys confirmed the infection.

    The non-native species, which was introduced to Britain by the Victorians, has not previously been confirmed in the Highlands.

    Strathdon in the heart of Aberdeenshire and Blair Atholl have been the nearest the animals have come to the region's borders.

    Highland Red Squirrel Group was established to help monitor and conserve reds.

    Mr Macdonald added that SNH was asking people to get in touch if they spotted a grey squirrel or to log any sightings on its squirrel survey website.
     
  2. American Dream

    American Dream Read Only Funster

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    That is bad news Sharon.

    The Grey Squirrel has effectively driven the Native red from our shores.:Sad:

    Seems they are now about to drive them from one of the the last Places they survive in the wild in the UK.


    Oooerr Seems the word's out in the Lake District.

    [​IMG]


    Squirrel's epic swim across lake

    [​IMG] The squirrel swam at least 300 yards

    Tourists on board a pleasure boat in the Lake District could not believe their eyes when they spotted a red squirrel in the middle of Ullswater.
    The mammals can swim, but they find it very strenuous, and have been known to drown in water troughs.
    But this determined squirrel had swum 300 yards (274m) - or about the length of six swimming pools - from the shore.
    Passengers lowered a rope to the mammal and it climbed on board and hitched a lift back to shore.
    [​IMG] The mammal then hitched a ride back to shore


    Robert Benson, chairman of the Penrith and District Red Squirrel Group, said: "I've been involved with the conservation of red squirrels for 15 years and I know they can swim, but I have never seen it.
    "This squirrel was swimming strongly and had its tail coiled on its back so it didn't look bedraggled or as if it was struggling. "I've never seen anything like it before." Once ashore the squirrel ran along a fence and disappeared, apparently none the worse for its dip.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2008

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