Fulltimer or not a Fulltimer.

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by Pikey Pete, Aug 31, 2012.

  1. Pikey Pete

    Pikey Pete Read Only Funster

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    I've been fulltiming for the last 6 years and have now decided to change my life style.

    I am now staying in my Brothers house ( he lost his partner in March ) when not on a summer tour.

    I have a Caravan in Spain and stay in that during the winter, using the Motorhome for the odd winter tour.

    Am I still a full timer? You decide!


    Pete:Cool:
     
  2. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    You are not living FullTime in your van... You are not a fulltimer.

    I don't care about the "if you own a home" argument. It all boils down to do you live in it fulltime...

    Thanks for the other night btw.. Was a good night out :thumb:
     
  3. Pikey Pete

    Pikey Pete Read Only Funster

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    You're welcome Karl it was a good night. It's all to do with the company.

    You are right I am no longer a fulltimer, except for the world of Aviva and Comfort, where apparently I still am. :Sad:

    No matter what I do or where I live, unless I am on the Electoral role at an address I am a fulltimer, and there was me thinking that the Electoral role was a voluntary thing.:Eeek:

    There is nowhere I can go, I'm a marked man. This is what you get for being honest from the start.:Angry:

    £400 buys me an all singing all dancing policy as an ordinary human being, but £1000. is what that same policy costs ME, even though I don't live in my Motorhome anymore.:Sad:

    My advice to anyone going fulltiming is don't tell your insurance company.

    Pete, not so:Cool:
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2012
  4. Pikey Pete

    Pikey Pete Read Only Funster

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    Aviva have now said that just going onto the Electoral Role isn't sufficient any more, they now want an official rental agreement between my brother and myself:Eeek:

    I give up.:cry:




    Pete not even slightly:Cool:anymore.
     
  5. maz

    maz Funster

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    I would strongly disagree with you. If you have to make a claim and you have withheld information (whether they ask for it or not), then they are under no obligation to pay up. Worst case scenario - you could lose the entire cost of your van. :Sad:
     
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  6. Pikey Pete

    Pikey Pete Read Only Funster

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    Whilst I would normally agree with you, there is as, far as I know no written rule to determine what does and what does not constitute Fulltiming.

    You would think it was some one who lives Fulltime in their motorhome but apparently not.
    Someone who only uses their motorhome for holidays for example, but does not appear on the Electoral Roll and who, if not a home owner, does not have a proper rental agreement is apparently a fulltimer.

    So for example if you live with your parents you are classified as a fulltimer for insurance purposes or if you are a spouse or partner and not the home owner or bill payer then you are also a fulltimer.

    The mind boggles.

    Pete:Cool:
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2012
  7. maz

    maz Funster

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    Comfort Insurance provide a pretty clear definition of what they regard as fulltiming:


    Long Term Touring & Full Timing
    13. This policy is subject to the following conditions:
    Policyholders must maintain a full UK residence, either through ownership or long term rental agreement
    (of at least 9 months) unless a full-timing rate has been agreed and paid.
    The address shown on the Schedule must be the one at which the policyholder is on the electoral roll,
    (unless a full-timing rate has been agreed and paid) and also the one that appears on the driving licence
    and vehicle documentation.
    The motor caravan must at all times have a valid MOT certificate (unless not required due to age of the
    vehicle) and current UK road fund licence & tax disc.
    Should a copy of a utility bill (as evidence of residence at the address) be requested at any time
    (inception, mid-term, renewal, in the event of a claim) then one must be provided.
     
  8. Pikey Pete

    Pikey Pete Read Only Funster

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    Comfort are not an Insurance Company they are Brokers/Agents.

    The first highlighted piece is exactly my point.

    If you live with some one, even if married and do not have ownership of the property or a rental agreement you are a full timer according to Comfort.

    The second highlighted point also means that if you don't pay the household bills even though you live at this address then you must be a fulltimer so if you make a claim they could refuse to pay.

    Which is obviously a load of b******s.

    Pete:Cool:
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2012
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  9. motorhomer

    motorhomer Read Only Funster

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    Originally Posted by maz
    I would strongly disagree with you. If you have to make a claim and you have withheld information (whether they ask for it or not), then they are under no obligation to pay up. Worst case scenario - you could lose the entire cost of your van.


    I agree with the sentiments expressed by maz but this is not the worst case scenario. Should you be unfortunate enough to be in an accident where someone was seriously injured, or killed, and it was deemed to be your fault, and you have given the insurance company a reason not to pay by not telling them your full circumstances, then you could lose everything you own - not just your van!

    Like it or not, you are risking a great deal if you are not entirely open with your insurance company however unreasonable it seems to be.
     
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  10. Gromett

    Gromett Funster

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    I agree with Maz, agree with Pete but disagree with this sorry.

    3rd party cover cannot as I understand it be invalidated on a technicality.
    I may be wrong on this. But if your cover has been paid for the insurance company cannot opt out of paying a 3rd party. Yes you will lose your van and everything in it and yes the insurance company may chase you through the courts but it isn't automatic. And if your cover doesn't specifically limit how long you can use your motorhome for you "may" be ok from a 3rd party point of view.
     
  11. ShiftZZ

    ShiftZZ Funster Life Member

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    Question

    If you are full timing what address will you have on your drivers licence?

    Regarding the 'non disclosure' of information, thats a big risk.. Most insurance companies subscribe to SIRA, CIFAS, Nation Hunter, Detect or CUE, all these systems enable companies to share data, this in conjunction with all the data that will be shared directly with the Credit Reference Agencies.

    I am aware that Local Authorities have recently run their data (single occupier data) through the credit reference agencies and have identified a large number where the house is not a single occupancy but multi occupancy and they have been able to recover the full rates.

    Insurance companies also share intelligence via AIB and IFIG so any issues could be shared.

    The issue raised by the OP regarding the full timing or not, may be down to a 'risk' issue rather than the reason raised. I could be wrong, but, if a Motorhomer decides to full time then the risks' associated with that lifestyle will be assessed, I am assuming that most full timers do not park in certain areas, i.e. the lifestyle is 'normally' non urban, so therefore the risks are lower. The premium may be calculated to reflect this. Having said that, the reason why they must be informed could be that the area that you may stay and park in is of a higher risk than those calculated as a typical full timer, so therefore the risk could be higher, or lower as the case may be.

    What I do know is that not telling them may well cause you substantial personal losses with the potential for criminal prosecution.

    Only a legally qualified person having looked at the contract/policy would be able to tell you and that may have to be tested in court.
     
  12. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

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    Totally the opposite. Failure to provide the details requested when you receive a form (or if you provide false information) can lead to a £1000 fine. If you are living in somebody else's household that person will receive the form but he/she is obliged to include your details as a resident as, otherwise, they would be providing false information.

    On the general point of insurance, what on Earth is wrong with complete honesty? Apart from the fact that most of us wish to protect our valuable possessions with insurance we have a legal responsibility to protect third parties if we wish to use a vehicle. No matter what lifestyle any of us chooses we cannot avoid that responsibility so it is up to each of us to make sure we do so.

    If a particular insurance company (or several) does not wish to form a contract with me in the basis of a lifestyle of my choice it is up to me to find one that does - and if I am unable to do so to change my choice.
     
  13. motorhomer

    motorhomer Read Only Funster

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    Grommetts Post
    You may be right, I do not claim to be an expert, but is lying about your home address merely a technicality? I would have thought this was a serious breach that could invalidate the entire policy.

    I may be wrong (some say I frequently am!) but its not a risk I would take!
     
  14. GJH

    GJH Funster Life Member

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    Where a driver is uninsured, third parties are covered by the uninsured drivers agreement between the government and the Motor Insurers Bureau (MIB) - see Here.

    As every motor insurance proposal form stresses the absolute necessity of providing true information then providing false information (whether address, vehicle usage or whatever) is a serious breach of contract (fraud) which invalidates the insurance, rather than just a technicality.
     
  15. maz

    maz Funster

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    Comfort is one of the few (possibly the only?) companies that provide true fulltimimg insurance. I choose to accept their conditions and pay the fulltimimg rate (tho' my premium is considerably less than the £1000 you mentioned).

    Although you no longer live in your van and therefore are not a fulltimer as we would recognise it, you are presumably classed as 'long term touring' by Comfort and so come under their 'Long Term Touring and Fulltiming' classification.

    If you choose not to accept their conditions then that is up to you. Good luck in finding true insurance that suits your specific situation. :Smile:

    However, advising anyone going fulltime not to tell their insurance company is irresponsible. :thumbdown:
     
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