front wheel drive - poor traction

Discussion in 'Motorhome Chat' started by bernardfeay, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. bernardfeay

    bernardfeay Read Only Funster

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    I have a Hymer Exsis which of course has front wheel drive. I notice that steep hills with wet roads very easily get my wheels spinning. Would fatter tyres help, lower pressures or more high quality tyres.

    I have a journey to make in Austria in Winter and the prospect of slipping and sliding at the slightest incline is a worry.

    All tips appreciated.
     
  2. pablomc

    pablomc Funster Life Member

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    Not familiar with your vehicle and just a thought, but it maybe worth investigating your axle loading as is sounds like you may have more over the rear axle, rear over hang.
     
  3. Snowbird

    Snowbird Funster Life Member

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    Agree with above post,also I have an idea that snow chains are compulsery in Austria in winter.
     
  4. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    You are in One Big Club. These FWD MHs are a waste of space traction wise.

    Which does not help you one bit unless it helps to know that they are all the same. Corners and roundabouts, even worse because one front wheel is hardly on the ground. I can get wheelspin in 3rd on a wet corner.
     
  5. wivvy's dad

    wivvy's dad Read Only Funster

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    Get the missus to sit on the bonnet















    I'll get me coat
     
  6. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    Never mind that, how fast can you run ?

    On another forum I used a lot we had a bunker, so often the request was "where are the keys to the bunker".
     
  7. pablomc

    pablomc Funster Life Member

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    Don't you slow down for corners and roundabouts then? :whistle:
     
  8. yorkshirepudding

    yorkshirepudding Read Only Funster

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    Slowing down wastes fuel. You have to use more fuel to regain momentum, slow down at your peril.
    Maintain speed and save the Earth.
     
  9. barryd

    barryd Read Only Funster

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    We have a motorbike on the back of our Kontiki and despite Mrs D tellling me to go on a diet (I am a fat barsteward) I have to keep drinking Stella and eating pies to keep the front end down. Its a bugger but there you go.
     
  10. 1948

    1948 Read Only Funster

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    have you consider fitting winter tyres, the difference in grip in snow and ice is greatly improved. Think is compulsory in winter in Austria, well, for the locals anyway.
     
  11. bernardfeay

    bernardfeay Read Only Funster

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    thanks for the advice guys with regard to their being too much weight behind the rear axle. I think the only thing I can do about that is to make sure the water tank is empty.
     
  12. highwayman

    highwayman Funster Life Member

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    Hi all
    We found that changing tyres made a huge difference to traction. :thumb:
    We dumped our michelins due to their age and have gone with Hankooks.
    Far less wheelspin and we can see they're wearing, the michelins still had most of their tread depth when we got rid.



    cheers...nige
     
  13. Jaws

    Jaws Funster Life Member

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    To answer the original question, wider tyres would help in the dry but not in the wet unless they are cut specifically for wet conditions

    Very odd bit of info.
    The ideal width of tyre on the average road vehicle is 50mm :Eeek:
    Wider than that and they are prone to aquaplane..

    That is why a good many of the tyres around nowadays have deep grooves at about 50mm spacings ( lots of other grooves too, all designed to help shift water out from under the tyre as efficiently as possible )
     
  14. rainbow chasers

    rainbow chasers Read Only Funster

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    Jaws is completely correct - a wider tyre would give better grip in dry conditions as there is more tyre in contact with the road. In wet or muddy conditions, widers tyres will skate about and will not be able to either dig into mud to find a hard surface, or clear water away as efficiently as a narrow tyre meaning less grip.

    Tyres have different compounds, there are hard tyres and soft. Though the soft will wear faster, they will give good grip. Harder tyres will be fine in the dry, but loose it in the wet, slippery conditions as they need to be much warmer. Hankooks are great for heavier vehicles as they need some weight on them, put them on a light car and they aren't much use at all. It is a matter of knowing the compounds, or asking your dealer. Good all round make is Maxxis, with good grip and durability - they are not often used on cars for some reason, but motorcyclists and off roaders have been using them for years almost religiously. They are also fairly cheap.

    What you may need to consider, is compound or ballast. If you are towing, or carrying heavy weights on the rear - work out your loadings and consider a front ballast. This will add weight and use a little more fuel, but will compensate for rearward weight and give you a pleasent and safer drive.

    These attach under your front end, usually through the bumper mounts. A U-Shaped plate with weight attached. It need not be a heavy weight, just enough to compensate for your average loading. You will notice these on recovery trucks (spec lift types) - peer under the front and and you will see!
     
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