flat battery & blown fuses!

Discussion in 'Tech/Mech General' started by Elvis, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. Elvis

    Elvis Read Only Funster

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    We are still having electrical issues! Engine battery is fine now - that was a loose earth wire! But still getting blown fuses and a flat leisure battery :Eeek:

    A few times now, we have got ready to set off for the weekend and found our leisure battery flat and/or a fuse blown; one was actually melted!:Eeek: We checked around and could see that nothing had been left on and we had only been out in it a week before and all batteries were fully charged when we parked up!

    Any ideas?
     
  2. sinbad1

    sinbad1 Deleted User

    Sounds like something is drawing a large current to blow the fuse, perhaps there is some drain from a component even though its not switched on you could try:-

    1. Turn off engine and everything that uses current.
    2. Disconnect the negative (-) battery cable from the battery.
    3. Place a test light between the negative battery post and the disconnected cable. If the test light
    glows, either some electrical accessory is still on or there is a short that is draining battery current.
    4. If the test light doesn’t glow there is no current drain.
    5. To find the current drain, disconnect (one at a time) fuses and electrical components until the light
    stops glowing. When the light stops glowing that component or circuit contains the current drain.

    regards
     
  3. Tony Lee

    Tony Lee Read Only Funster

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    Which particular fuse is blown. The diagnosis may depend on which one it is and what size fuse it is.
     
  4. Shubberdog

    Shubberdog Deleted User

    Is the leisure battery remaining connected when you start up and trying to share the load of the starter motor i.e. Sticking contacts on a split charge relay :Sad:
     
  5. N&K

    N&K

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    We kept getting a flat battery , it turned out to be the glove box light not turning off when the glove box was shut. We even bought a new battery thinking our battery was on its way out, the new battery went flat too. we took the bulb out, problem solved! Try another battery if you can borrow one before buying a replacement and see if that goes flat.

    We also had a melting fuse, this turned out to be a stop/tail light bulb in one of the ceiling lights, (i.e a bulb with two base terminals instead of one, which was causing a short). Might be worth checking all your bulbs.

    N&K
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2009
  6. Elvis

    Elvis Read Only Funster

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    That's just it - 3 different fuses have blown, different uses. We think our leisure batt is on it's way out - could a dodgy batt blow the fuses or drain totally flat in 5 days (static) ?
     
  7. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    We've just had something similar on here - but it was the alternator faulty and putting too many volts.

    I wonder if a faulty charger has cooked the battery and blown the fuses ? Small chance.

    Has anyone touched the electrics ? A million to one, the leisure battery wired in series with the engine battery giving you a 24V leisure feed. This is *just* possible if the negative of the leisure battery touched the starter battery positive.
     
  8. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    if the batteries knackered it will be drawing a massive amount of current to try to charge it and it will self discharge in no time.
    shouldnt blow the fuses though, they are there to protect the wiring from overload/melting caused by a faulty appliance or damaged/short circuit wires.
     
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