Fixing to walls

Discussion in 'Tech/Mech General' started by marksmith, Aug 10, 2014.

  1. marksmith

    marksmith Read Only Funster

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    Hi folks,

    I have a couple of things I want to fix to the inside of the habitation area of my Rollerteam Living 15P - pretty much a standard coach-built MH I think. One is a light fitting which weighs nothing at all, and the other is a table rail which will have to withstand a bit of force.

    Can I just screw into the walls? What are they made of - what am I screwing into? What sort of screws grip well please?

    Thanks!
    -Mark
     
  2. keith

    keith Funster

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    Well the internal walls of your MH are screwed to the external walls so you should be OK. Just make sure the screws aren't too long. :doh:

    All the ones I have come across are normally ply
     
  3. funflair

    funflair Funster Life Member

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    Hi Mark

    I am not sure about the construction of the Rollerteam walls but they will be fibreboard or plywood inside, for lightweight fixing just a short screw is OK. For the heavier table rail you need to know if the inside panel is bonded to foam insulation or if there is a framework that you fix onto.

    In general more is better than trying to go too big.
     
  4. funflair

    funflair Funster Life Member

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    Duplicate text removed.
     
  5. hilldweller

    hilldweller Funster Life Member

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    The walls of the average MH are about 2mm ply except where the wooden frame is.

    Very difficult to hang something heavy.

    Cavity wall fixing my work or may just pull through the ply.

    When hanging a TV I went through an internal wall into the wardrobe and put a large ply plate in the wardrobe to spread the load.
     
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  6. Detnor

    Detnor Funster

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    Probably not appropriate here but when fitting a security box thing I used 'jack nuts' to provide a steel thread to bolt into. They work like a cavity wall anchor and installed with a machine screw. We used to use them to attach load rails to plywood linings.
     
  7. Barclaybasher

    Barclaybasher Funster

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    For lightweight stuff - double sided sticky pads - good ones
     
  8. pappajohn

    pappajohn Funster Life Member

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    The internal walls are GLUED to the wooden frame and foam infill panels as is the outer skin.....at no point will they be nailed or screwed.
     
  9. Techno

    Techno Funster Life Member

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    A lot can be achieved with adhesive tape as suggested.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. funflair

    funflair Funster Life Member

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    When you are screwing into something relatively thin it is worth making sure that the screw is the same size as the hole in what you are fixing as this stops the thin material from just pulling into the hole that you are fixing up, if this is not possible it is worth putting a thin baton on first if possible with the right size hole of course.

    And some double sided tape as well as this just helps to spread the load, only if you don't plan to remove it again at some time though.
     
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  11. marksmith

    marksmith Read Only Funster

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    Thanks all.

    Fixed the light to the side of a cupboard in the end so didn't matter anyway. The table rail may be more of a problem by the sound of it. I had a closer look at a bit of wall which has a hole in it (where the water filler comes through), and indeed it's just hardboard about 2mm thick on the inside, then some sort of insulation which doesn't look strong - so half the weight of the table would be hanging on 2mm hardboard. Not sure that is going to fly. Sky hooks it is.

    Thanks for all the replies!
     
  12. Barclaybasher

    Barclaybasher Funster

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    For the table rail - if it is against a flat (ish) wall cut a panel (faced ply, MDF) matching the wall to the height you need for the rail and width of the table.

    Fasten the rail on the top edge of the panel and fix panel to the wall with double sided tape or adhesive.

    This will carry the weight of that edge of the table vertically downwards
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2014
  13. marksmith

    marksmith Read Only Funster

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    Unfortunately there's a little ledge below the table - it doesn't go to the floor. The ledge itself is also not very well supported (in fact it has torn free from the wall already) so can't take the weight of the table.

    The reason for wanting to install a rail is so the table can stay put when we're on the move. (We tend not to stay in the same place more than one night in a row, or at least go out in the van during the day.) I have another idea, which is to fix a clip to the floor, and clip the table foot into it...
     
  14. Mr Ed

    Mr Ed Funster

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    As a fellow owner of a roller 15 P I don't think the walls are very thick or strong for fixing anything heavy .By the way did you read the fixed bed debate on here,when people were saying no lounge space if you have fixed bed,I think they haven't seen our vans.::bigsmile:
     
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